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Short version of my question:

If I hold a cursor reference to an astronomically huge result set in my client code, would it be ridiculous (i.e. completely defeats the point of cursors) to issue "FETCH ALL FROM cursorname" as my next command? Or would this slowly stream the data back to me as I consume it (at least in principle, assuming that I have a well written driver sitting between me and Postgres)?

More detail

If I understand things at all correctly, then Postgres cursors are REALLY for dealing with the following problem [even though they can be used (abused?) for other things, such as returning multiple different result sets from one function]:

Note: The current implementation of RETURN NEXT and RETURN QUERY stores the entire result set before returning from the function, as discussed above. That means that if a PL/pgSQL function produces a very large result set, performance might be poor: data will be written to disk to avoid memory exhaustion, but the function itself will not return until the entire result set has been generated.

(ref: https://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.6/static/plpgsql-control-structures.html)

But (again if I understand correctly) when you write a function which returns a cursor then the whole query is NOT buffered into memory (and disk) before the user of the function can start to consume anything, but instead the results can be consumed bit by bit. (There is more overhead setting up and using the cursor, but it's worth it to avoid massive buffer allocation for very large result sets.)

(ref: https://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.6/static/plpgsql-cursors.html#AEN66551)

I would like to understand how this relates to SELECTS and FETCHES over the wire to a Postgres server.

In all cases, I'm talking about consuming results from client code which is communicating with Postgres on a socket behind the scenes (using the Npgsql library in my case, actually).

Q1: What if I try to execute "SELECT * FROM AstronomicallyLargeTable" as my only command over the wire to Postgres? Will that allocate all the memory for the entire select and then start to send data back to me? Or will it (effectively) generate its own cursor and stream the data back a little at a time (with no huge additional buffer allocation on the server)?

Q2: What if I already have a cursor reference to an astronomically large result set (say because I've already done one round trip, and got back the cursor reference from some function), and then I execute "FETCH ALL FROM cursorname" over the wire to Postgres? Is that stupid, because it will allocate ALL the memory for all the results on the Postgres server before sending anything back to me? Or will "FETCH ALL FROM cursorname" actually work as I'd like it to, streaming the data back slowly as I consume it, without any massive buffer allocation happening on the Postgres server?

EDIT: Further clarification

I'm asking about a case where I know that my data access layer streams the data from the server to me one row at a time (so no large client-side buffers involved there, however long the data streams for) and where I also know that my own application consumes the data one row at a time and then discards it (so no client-side buffers there, either). I definitely DON'T want to fetch all these rows into client side memory, and then do something with them. I see that that would be completely daft!

So I think all the issues (for the just-described use case) are about how long PostgreSQL would take to start streaming and how much of a memory buffer it would allocate, for a FETCH ALL. IF (and it's a big 'IF'...) PostgreSQL doesn't allocate a huge buffer of all rows before starting, and if it streams the rows back to Npgsql one at a time, starting quickly, then I believe (but please tell me why/if I'm wrong) that there still IS a clear use case for FETCH ALL FROM cursorname!

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    PostgreSQL allocates memory for result on client side. For big result you needs lot of memory on client side. FETCH ALL is very similar to classic SELECT. More typical usafe (you don't need too much memory, you don't need to wait too long) is FETCH NEXT 10000 in cycle. Commented Feb 17, 2017 at 9:41
  • @pavel-stehule Thank you! But the info I need to find out about is what happens on the server side. In fact (I think you'll agree?) PostgreSQL doesn't do anything at all on the client side! Npgsql and then my application do. Npgsql streams the data. If my application uses the data one row at a time, then I think no large buffers are ever needed on the client, however large the result set is.
    – MikeBeaton
    Commented Feb 17, 2017 at 10:04
  • 1
    Npgsql always works in "single-row" mode - it never buffers the entire resultset. It even has SequentialAccess mode, which buffers on a column-by-column value for rows which contain huge values (somewhat rare/extreme). See npgsql.org/doc/performance.html for more info on Npgsql internal buffering. Commented Feb 17, 2017 at 10:15
  • The PostgreSQL paragraph you quoted pretty much says it all - functions currently have to complete before any result is sent to the client, forcing PostgreSQL to do server-side buffering of the entire resultset. This can be worked around by returning a cursor. Commented Feb 17, 2017 at 10:42
  • 1
    @bmju if it is possible, then Postgres doesn't use buffers on server side. The data are send to client immediately. Only when the execution requires materialization, then server side buffers (temp files) are used. Commented Feb 17, 2017 at 11:44

2 Answers 2

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After some experimenting it seems like PostgreSQL behaves like this:

  • Fetching many rows with SELECT * FROM large will not create a temporary file on the server side, the data are streamed as they are scanned.

  • If you create a server side cursor with a function that returns refcursor and fetch rows from the cursor, all returned rows are collected on the server first. This leads to the creation of a temporary file if you run FETCH ALL.

Here are my experiments with a table that contains 1000000 rows. work_mem is set to 64kb (the minimum). log_temp_files is set to 0 so that temporary files are reported in the server log.

  • First attempt:

    SELECT id FROM large;
    

    Result: no temporary file is created.

  • Second attempt:

    CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION lump() RETURNS refcursor
       LANGUAGE plpgsql AS
    $$DECLARE
       c CURSOR FOR SELECT id FROM large;
    BEGIN
       c := 'c';
       OPEN c;
       RETURN c;
    END;$$;
    
    BEGIN;
    SELECT lump();
     lump
    ------
     c
    (1 row)
    
    FETCH NEXT FROM c;
     id
    ----
      1
    (1 row)
    
    FETCH NEXT FROM c;
     id
    ----
      2
    (1 row)
    
    COMMIT;
    

    Result: no temporary file is created.

  • Third attempt:

    BEGIN;
    SELECT lump();
     lump
    ------
     c
    (1 row)
    
    FETCH all FROM c;
       id
    ---------
           1
           2
           3
    ...
      999999
     1000000
    (1000000 rows)
    
    COMMIT;
    

    Result: a temporary file of about 140MB is created.

I don't really know why PostgreSQL behaves that way.

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    @laurenz-albe, the server-side buffering seems to be a result of generate_series() as opposed to the use of cursors. If you create a huge table (e.g. by doing SELECT * INTO data FROM generate_series(1, 10000000);) and then change your function to select from that, no temp file is generated. This shows that cursors definitely do not always cause server-side buffering. Commented Feb 17, 2017 at 10:31
  • Doh. Thanks for that observation. I have rewritten the answer. Commented Feb 17, 2017 at 13:32
  • Maybe your work_mem setting was different and the data were buffered in RAM? Commented Feb 18, 2017 at 3:51
  • @Laurenz-Albe - I've realised what is going on. You do need to look for temp files in base\pgsql_tmp as well, because the buffer file is only reported (in the log) when it is released, but it first appears (in the directory) at some point while the data is streaming. (Result: the temp file appears in the log just before the user sees the first row of data on anything using libpq (e.g. psql), but just after the user sees the last row of data on a streaming client program built on a streaming data access layer like Npgsql!)
    – MikeBeaton
    Commented Feb 19, 2017 at 7:29
  • @LaurenzAlbe - it's 140MB, not 14MB...!
    – MikeBeaton
    Commented Feb 21, 2017 at 12:31
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One thing that is missing in your question is if you really need a plpgsql function as opposed to an inlined sql function. I only bring it up because your description is a simple scenario - select * from hugetable. So I am going to answer the question based on that information.

In that case, your problem is not really a problem, because the function call can be invisible. My point is that if you can write the function as an inline SQL function, which you don't indicate one way or another, you don't need to worry about this particular limitation of plpgsql RETURN QUERY.

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION foo()
RETURNS TABLE (id INT)
AS
$BODY$
SELECT * FROM bar;
$BODY$
LANGUAGE SQL STABLE;

Look at the plan:

EXPLAIN (ANALYZE, BUFFERS)
SELECT * FROM foo() LIMIT 1;

QUERY PLAN
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Limit  (cost=0.00..0.01 rows=1 width=4) (actual time=0.017..0.017 rows=1 loops=1)
   Buffers: shared hit=1
   ->  Seq Scan on bar  (cost=0.00..14425.00 rows=1000000 width=4) (actual time=0.014..0.014 rows=1 loops=1)
         Buffers: shared hit=1
 Planning time: 0.082 ms
 Execution time: 0.031 ms
(6 rows)

There is no entire result set being filled out then returned.

https://wiki.postgresql.org/wiki/Inlining_of_SQL_functions

I will defer to the other answers here if you really need plpgsql to do some non-sql foo, but this really needed to be said here.

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  • That is a very useful point @DB140141, and it could definitely help me or someone else who wants to stream large data. But actually (though I did not say so because I thought it would confuse the issue), I really want to contribute to supporting cursors correctly in a library! So the basic question for me was (and still is), if I DO have a cursor referencing very large data (for whatever reason, just... IF I do), then is FETCH ALL FROM cursor always daft, or can it sometimes make perfectly good sense?
    – MikeBeaton
    Commented Feb 17, 2017 at 17:01

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