36
function* foo() {
  yield 123
};

// - - -

function* foo() {
  return yield 123
};

I can’t seem to demonstrate the difference between the two.

  • Is there a demonstrable difference?
  • Should return be used in a generator?
1
  • thanks for ask, many answer help me to know more about JS Generators.
    – yussan
    Jan 7, 2018 at 16:00

2 Answers 2

44

First, I'll start by saying that Generators are a somewhat complicated topic, so giving a complete overview here won't be possible. For more information I'd highly recommend Kyle Simpson's You Don't Know JS series. Book 5 (Async & Performance) has an excellent discussion on the ins and outs of generators.

Onto the specific example you gave though!

First, the code that you wrote in the example will show no difference but only if it's run correctly. Here's an example:

function* foo() {
  yield 123;
}

function* bar() {
  return yield 123;
}

var f = foo();
var b = bar();

f.next(); // {value: 123, done: false}
f.next(); // {value: undefined, done: true}
b.next(); // {value: 123, done: false}
b.next(); // {value: undefined, done: true}

As you can see, I'm not calling the generator like a normal function. The generator itself returns a generator object (a form of iterator). We store that iterator in a variable and use the .next() function to advance the iterator to the next step (a yield or return keyword).

The yield keyword allows us to pass a value into the generator, and this is where your examples will run differently. Here's what that would look like:

function* foo() {
  yield 123;
}

function* bar() {
  return yield 123;
}

var f = foo();
var b = bar();

// Start the generator and advance to the first `yield`
f.next(); // {value: 123, done: false}
b.next(); // {value: 123, done: false}

/** Now that I'm at a `yield` statement I can pass a value into the `yield`
 * keyword. There aren't any more `yield` statements in either function,
 * so .next() will look for a return statement or return undefined if one
 * doesn't exist. Like so:
 */
f.next(2); // {value: undefined, done: true}
b.next(2); // {value: 2, done: true}

Notice that foo() will return undefined as a value, whereas bar() returns the number 2. This is because the value we're passing into the .next() call is sent to the return keyword and set as the return value. foo() has no explicit return statement, so you get the default undefined behavior.

Hope that this helps!

1
  • 1
    There is some small logical flaws in the writing: bar() does not return 2. It returns a Generator object (as you already pointed out above). However, the final b.next(2) call returns an object with its value prop set to 2. That is because, when calling next() after the final yield (i.e. the final pause/interruption), it runs the function to completion, and its final value is the function's return value.
    – Domi
    Mar 14 at 16:19
19

The difference is the result value of the last continuation call:

function* fooA() {
  yield 123
};
var a = fooA();
console.log(a.next(1)); // {done:false, value:123}
console.log(a.next(2)); // {done:true,  value:undefined}

function* fooB() {
  return 40 + (yield 123)
};
var b = fooB();
console.log(b.next(1)); // {done:false, value:123}
console.log(b.next(2)); // {done:true,  value:42}

Most generators don't need a return value, their purpose is the generation of a value stream as a side effect when they are running. All iterators are of this kind, if they are ran by a for of loop the result just signifies the end, but the value is discarded.

However, there also are generators where a result value is important, e.g. when they are used as a tool to describe asynchronous processes (in a polyfill for async/await promise syntax, or also many more things like CSP). You also get the returned value when using yield* on an iterable.

In any case, return yield together doesn't sound very useful.

3
  • Hmmph... Just can't understand why it finally yields 42, not 41, so is that the yield excuted two times?
    – a_a
    Apr 23, 2019 at 20:24
  • 2
    @a_a The argument to the first .next(1) call is discarded. The final result comes from adding 40 and 2.
    – Bergi
    Apr 23, 2019 at 20:34
  • I see! Thank you!
    – a_a
    Apr 23, 2019 at 22:23

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