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The question as mentioned above is as follows: Given two integers, x1 and x2, find another integer, x3, which is different from both x1 and x2 , without using the if keyword.

My solution is based on bit wise operations on integers plus on the fact that XOR between two bits will return 1 if and only if the two bits are not equal.

Is this solution valid ? Can you find a better solution ? Off course that run time considerations and memory consumption should be as good as possible.

Note: The ternary operations and comparisons(i.e. - != , == ) are as well NOT allowed

Thanks in advance,

Guy.

My solution:

int foo(int x1,int x2)
{
    // xor
    int x3 = x1 ^ x2;

    // another xor 
    x3 = x3 ^ x2;

    // not
    x3 = ~x3;

    return x3;  

}
  • 1
    What you have is ~(x ^ y ^ y), which is just ~x, so it doesn’t work if y = ~x. – Ry- Feb 18 '17 at 8:50
  • 2
    z = x^y; z=z^y means z=x then z==~x may be ~x == y??? – Jean-Baptiste Yunès Feb 18 '17 at 8:50
  • 1
    You can do a disguised if using multiplicative properties: a= c*x+(1-c)*y that gives you x if c==1 and y if c==0. May be using it in some way? – Jean-Baptiste Yunès Feb 18 '17 at 8:54
  • 1
    @A.Monti - Thanks for the clarification. The goal is to return a third number , any number, with the requirements that: 1) It wont be x1 nor x2. 2) I can not use the if keyword. – Guy Avraham Feb 18 '17 at 8:55
  • 2
    Anyway, you can make a number that’s different from x1 in the twos position and different from x2 in the ones position: (~x1 & 2) | (~x2 & 1). – Ry- Feb 18 '17 at 9:00
4

Converting my comments to an answer:

What you have is ~(x ^ y ^ y), which is just ~x, so it doesn’t work if y = ~x. One option instead is to make a number that’s different from x1 in the twos position and different from x2 in the ones position:

return ~(x1 & 2 | x2 & 1);

(Simplification from (~x1 & 2) | (~x2 & 1) credit to @chux. Thanks!)

  • 3
    What is neat about this is that is it is easy to extend to 3,4,... integer_width integers. (maybe not the sign bit on non 2's). – chux Feb 18 '17 at 9:37
3

Being pedantic, since they said no if keyword then ternaries should be fair game...

return (x1+1 == x2) ? x1+2 : x1+1;

Of course, maybe that's cheating. No problem, here's a ternary-free version:

return x1+1+(x1+1==x2);

And don't worry, if you think the conditional is still cheating, there are many ways to implement it with straight bit manipulation.

Note that the addition solution is really only valid for unsigned integers, since it induces the potential for signed overflow (which is UB). If this is a concern, you can replace the addition with another operation (for example, x1^(1+(x1^1==x2)).

  • 1
    You are peeking at the flags register with ==, which is an implicit if. – Paul Ogilvie Feb 18 '17 at 9:21
  • 1
    @PaulOgilvie that makes no sense – M.M Feb 18 '17 at 9:24
  • 1
    Naughty since this emits the potential for integer overflow. – Bathsheba Feb 18 '17 at 9:35
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    @PaulOgilvie There is no "flags register" in C. Your point is irrelevant. – EOF Feb 18 '17 at 11:21
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    Bathsheba: correct, this only works for unsigned integers. (I was planning to add it to the answer but neglected to actually do so). This has been fixed. – nneonneo Feb 22 '17 at 2:46

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