7

I want to call a method with async multiple times. A simplified example is shown below:

size_t counter(std::string &s)
{
    return s.size();
}

void stringCountAccumulator()
{
    std::vector<std::string> foos = {"this", "is", "spartaa"};
    size_t total = 0;
    for (std::string &s : foos)
    {
        std::future<size_t> fut = std::async(
            std::launch::async,
            counter, s);

        total += fut.get();
    }
    std::cout << "Total: " << total;
}

It seems that, fut.get() blocks other future calls. How can I implement this problem in C++? I need to call a function in a separate thread. This function "returns" a value.

3 Answers 3

8
void stringCountAccumulator()
{
  std::vector<std::string> foos = {"this", "is", "spartaa"};
  std::vector<std::future<size_t>> calcs;
  for (auto&& s : foos) {
    calcs.push_back( std::async(
      std::launch::async,
      counter, s)
    );
  }
  std::size_t total = 0;
  for (auto&& fut:calcs)
    total += fut.get();
  std::cout << "Total: " << total << "\n";
}

.get() is blocking. So don't block until you have queue'd up all tasks.

An alternative plan is to write/find a thread pool, and have each task update a possibly atomic (or mutex guarded) counter.

Have a finished-task counter guarded (again, possibly atomic).

Have a promise (of the total) which you fulfill when the last task is finished (fulfilled by the last task).

Return the future from that promise. Now you have a future representing the entire pool of threads calculating their value and adding it up, with lots of concurrency.

Some frameworks, like microsoft's ppl, have a system where it does something like this for you; you have tasks that return values, and a function object that combines the values, and get the result of the combination out of it.

2
  • Yakk, I have another question. If there is a global variable which is updated in counter function, does it have any problems ? Like something that size_t counter(std::string &s, std::vector<size_t> &listSize) { listSize.push_pack(s.size()); return s.size(); }
    – fanfan1609
    Sep 4, 2019 at 2:19
  • 1
    @fanfan Please use the [ask question] button to ask questions on stack overflow. Sep 4, 2019 at 3:09
1

Have a look at this: C++ threads for background loading. This explains how to get the result of any finished task.

2
  • Thanks, I will check it. Is not there any callback mechanism? Do I have to check if the task is completed? Feb 18, 2017 at 11:14
  • Yes, you have to check manually whether tasks have finished.
    – The Techel
    Feb 18, 2017 at 11:17
1

You also need to declare that StringCountAccumulator() will be executed asynchronously. Also call future::get() only when the future is ready. Here's a code snippet :

 std::future<void> stringCountAccumulator()
 {
    std::vector<std::string> foos = {"this", "is", "spartaa"};
    size_t total = 0;
    for (std::string &s : foos)
    {
        std::future<size_t> fut = std::async(
           std::launch::async, counter, s);
        while (!fut.is_ready() ) ;
        total += fut.get();
    }
   std::cout << "Total: " << total;
  }
2
  • This is supposed to return a future, but where is the return statement?
    – smac89
    Mar 6, 2018 at 10:51
  • @smac89 I can't find anything specific but it seems that this is correct and intended. It is indicating that this function is asynchronous and that the value isn't returned. Hence the void as the template parameter. Jun 21, 2020 at 9:24

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