7

In my day-to-day work, I often find myself writing classes like in this simplified example:

class CGarage
{
public:
    CGarage();
    ~CGarage();
    typedef std::vector<Car> CarCollection;

private:
    CarCollection m_Cars;
};

I want the users of CGarage to have read only access to the CarCollection. In order to achieve that goal, those are some common solutions which are all not very satisfying:

Solution 1

class CGarage
{
    Car GetCar(CarCollection::size_type index) const;
    CarCollection::size_type CarCount() const;
};

Main disadvantage:

  • Lacking iterators, I can't use STL algorithms on Cars (e.g. for_each(...))

Solution 2

class CGarage
{
    CarCollection::const_iterator CarBegin() const;
    CarCollection::const_iterator CarEnd() const;
    CarCollection::size_type CarCount() const;
};

Main disadvantage:

  • A lot of boilerplate code if you need support for other iterator types (it, reverse_it).

Solution 3

class CGarage
{
    const CarCollection GetCars() const;
};

Main disadvantage:

  • cost of copying CarCollection when returning by value
  • implementation details known to users of class (e.g. can't change to std::list without change of breaking user code)

Solution 4

class CGarage
{
    const CarCollection& GetCars() const;
};

Main disadvantage:

  • lifetime of CarCollection reference bound to lifetime of CGarage
  • implementation details known to users of class

Questions

How would you provide read-only access to the CarCollection?

Does your solution change, if CarCollection is a vector with pointers to Car?

If you allow read and write access to the collection, is it acceptable to make the collection public?

Thanks for any advice

5

How would you provide read-only access to the CarCollection?

I don't see what's wrong with solution 4. It should be obvious to users of CGarage that a reference to its car collection is tied to the lifetime of the garage. If they need the car collection to outlive the garage then they can always take a copy if they like.

Alternatively, make CGarage hold a shared_ptr to the car collection and return that, but I wouldn't recommend it.

Does your solution change, if CarCollection is a vector with pointers to Car?

For collections of owned objects (i.e. reference types), it is best to use a different container. The std:: containers are all designed for value types, and don't handle reference types very well (especially constness). For these, use something like Boost's ptr_vector.

If you allow read and write access to the collection, is it acceptable to make the collection public?

Depends on your specific situation. Are the semantics of the collection likely to change? If not, then you can safely make it public (e.g. std::pair). I wouldn't recommend that you do this for domain specific problem though.

1

wouldn't it be sufficient to declare it like this?

const CarCollection& Cars() { return m_Cars; }

then

 CarCollection::const_iterator it = garage.Cars().begin();

should work but

  CarCollection::iterator it = garage.Cars().begin();

would give error.

1

I would go with solution 4. Regarding the problem of constness for containers of pointers, you could use boost::ptr_vector which correctly propagates constness (among other things).

  • Does "correctly propagates constness" mean, that if I return a const CarCollection or a const CarCollection& the pointer will point to a const car object (even though the collection is defined as std::vector<boost::ptr_vector<Car>>)? – nabulke Nov 20 '10 at 13:39
  • @nabulke yes, but it's boost::ptr_vector<Car>, and be careful, it's not the only difference with an std::vector (ptr_vector has ownership of the stored pointers) – icecrime Nov 20 '10 at 13:51
1

It depends.

  1. If the clients of the class need a vector of Cars, eg. they assume the cars are stored contiguously in memory for whatever reason (I don't see another reason though), then you should provide a member function returning a constant reference to a vector. Don't bother with passing by value and the inherent exception-safety problems associated with with object creation. If the vector has to outlive the Garage object, the client will make a copy.

  2. Now, in any other case, the least coupling principle suggest that we return a pair of iterators. After all, a pair of iterators is the generic expression of a collection. If the client of the class require complexity assumptions, then return the right kind of iterators (and document it).

  3. For convenience, and only when it makes sense, you can overload operator[]. A garage is a collection of cars. If the parking slots inside the garage are numbered and you want to access cars by slots, it can be a good solution.

Nonetheless, you're right in saying that C++ iterators are designed in a way which forces you to write a lot of boilerplate code. Then, when you first write the class, return a const reference to a vector, and then refactor.

0

Option 4, but return a reference to an abstract base class that includes explicit conversion operators to standard collections. That will at least cut back on the how much implementation detail is exposed.

To further cut back dependence on implementation details, convert the class that contains the collection to a template, parameterizing the collection type.

0

I can answer one:

If you allow read and write access to the collection, is it acceptable to make the collection public?

Not necessarily. What if you need to change the implementation, or you need to run a piece of code whenever the variable is changed. And even if you don't do this, you may need to in the future, and making a change from a public var to a set/get can break alot of code.

  • I agree. But how would you implement read/write access without showing container implementation details? – nabulke Nov 20 '10 at 13:16

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