33

I know how getter and setter work in JavaScript. What I don't understand is why we need them when we can get the same result using normal functions? Consider the following code:

var person = {
    firstName: 'Jimmy',
    lastName: 'Smith',
    get fullName() {
        return this.firstName + ' ' + this.lastName;
    }
}

console.log(person.fullName);    // Jimmy Smith

We can easily replace getter with a function:

var person = {
    firstName: 'Jimmy',
    lastName: 'Smith',
    fullName: function() {
        return this.firstName + ' ' + this.lastName;
    }
}

console.log(person.fullName());    // Jimmy Smith

I don't see the point of writing getter and setter.

closed as primarily opinion-based by Quentin, Justinas, Frxstrem, deceze Feb 20 '17 at 11:01

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 5
    I think it is just a "style" matter, as you don't "need" to use them, you "can" use them, if you wish – Igino Boffa Feb 20 '17 at 10:55
  • 1
    check this and this – Max Koretskyi aka Wizard Feb 20 '17 at 10:56
  • 2
    Arguably it can make code more readable: foo.status = 'inactive' vs. foo.setStatus('inactive') – deceze Feb 20 '17 at 11:00
  • 12
    This is not an opinion based question. It is completely valid and relates to accessibility of private variables. I was about to provide a completely valid answer. – Inkdot Feb 20 '17 at 11:05
  • 1
    Well, for those interested, getters and setters are a method of allowing accessibility of private variables inside a function. This ensures a user cannot get or set the variable unless they use the defined getter/setter methods. – Inkdot Feb 20 '17 at 11:07
19

A difference between using a getter or setter and using a standard function is that getters/setters are automatically invoked on assignment. So it looks just like a normal property but behind the scenes you can have extra logic (or checks) to be run just before or after the assignment.

So if you decide to add this kind of extra logic to one of the existing object properties that is already being referenced, you can convert it to getter/setter style without altering the rest of the code that has access to that property.

  • 2
    And the question is why foo.bar = baz using a setter is any better than foo.setBar(baz) – deceze Feb 20 '17 at 10:59
  • The question was slightly different than what you understand anyway, added a second paragraph to clarify the benefit. – Bulent Vural Feb 20 '17 at 11:05
  • 2
    Assuming you're designing an interface from the beginning to use getters/setters instead of retrofitting it… what's your answer then? – deceze Feb 20 '17 at 11:07
  • 4
    No, it doesn't. I'm saying I'm writing a new object today which does not have any references yet, and I'm opting to write get foo()/set foo() instead of getFoo()/setFoo()… why would I? – deceze Feb 20 '17 at 11:12
  • 2
    You cannot use the assignments like myObj.foo = 'some data' with getFoo, setFoo. You always need to call those functions. And if you change your mind later, say to add extra logic, you need to convert all references to function calls. – Bulent Vural Feb 20 '17 at 11:19

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