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Suppose I have renamed File A to File B with windows explorer and created a new File C.

In Tortoise SVN, I accidently use the "Repair Move" on File A and C, instead of A and B. Is there an easy way to undo the repair (and redo it with the right files)? Changes are not committed at that point.

The only way I'm currently aware of is reverting the delete and add, which will restore File A, then manually delete the file again and redo the associations correctly. With multiple files involved, this somewhat involves the risk of accidently reverting local changes, so I'm interested if there is a better way.

Note: even though TortoiseSVN is used to produce the problem, an answer with svn console is also acceptable.


Here is the example with Files A.txt, B.txt and C.txt step by step:

After A is renamed to B and C is added locally

>svn st
!       A.txt
?       B.txt
?       C.txt

After Tortoise SVN "Repair move" is incorrectly applied A -> C

>svn st
D       A.txt
        > moved to C.txt
?       B.txt
A  +    C.txt
        > moved from A.txt

My workflow to fix the situation, which I'm not really happy with:

>ren C.txt C.txt.bak
>svn revert C.txt A.txt
>ren C.txt.bak C.txt
>del A.txt

Resulting in the starting situation from where I can redo the repair with correct files

>svn st
!       A.txt
?       B.txt
?       C.txt

What I would love but which doesn't appear to exist

svn mv --force --ignore-files A.txt B.txt
svn add --force C.txt

in a way that it ignores that A is already marked deleted and allow a history transfer from A to B, reinterpreting C as clean add instead of transfering history from A.

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  • I might be getting it wrong but what you do NOT want to do is remove the changes from staging and then manually fix the renaming and then do the stage-commit. Is that right? IF it is, what exactly would be the automatic version of this process - ie - how are you going to tell SVN what changes you actually want? Mar 7 '17 at 9:28
  • A few more things - what actually is the risk? Would you be losing data/work if you commit the wrong files? How many files are we talking about? Mar 7 '17 at 10:03
  • @LeftyGBalogh I somehow hope there is a way to revert the SVN state (eg deleted) without actually restoring the file behind. This would allow me to redo the associations correctly. The risk is to get an inconsistent state between project meta files and code files, screwing up the version history or losing local changes. We are talking about a thing that happened to me in the past and will probably happen again in the future. I took care of it for past incidents but I'm not happy with my workflow of doing so.
    – grek40
    Mar 7 '17 at 10:06
  • @LeftyGBalogh After I change files locally, A would be missing, B and C would be new files not under version control. After the "repair move", A would be deleted and C would be added+. I want to go back to the point before "repair move" but if I just revert, file A will be restored physically.
    – grek40
    Mar 7 '17 at 10:12
  • I think I am beginning to understand your dilemma - svn revert --recursive folder_name will overwrite your current changes to the previous version - which you want to keep. You could restore everything manually into the state you want them and commit again, but that is a pain - other people also face this: stackoverflow.com/questions/5817316/svn-git-add-alternative . There is one more thing that puzzles me - when you say "Changes are not committed at that point." - Aren't you just free to make the commit once all files are in the right state? (Btw - can't you use Git instead?) Mar 7 '17 at 10:26
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+50

There is way involving 2 commands on A.txt only instead of the 4 commands in your current workflow (affecting C.txt too). After TortoiseSVN "repair move" is incorrectly applied, execute:

svn revert A.txt
del A.txt

svn stat will be:

!       A.txt
?       B.txt
A  +    C.txt

From Tortoise SVN you can now "repair move" between A.txt and B.txt, resulting in the correct state:

D       A.txt
        > moved to B.txt
A  +    B.txt
        > moved from A.txt
A  +    C.txt

Same technique can be used in TortoiseSVN UI (revert A.txt, then delete A.txt from the explorer). The reason why this works, is that the move state is coupled to the missing file, not to the non-versioned file. The only modification on C.txt is, that it was added by using the repair move command (which you wanted to add probably anyway).

The "Repair move" command only works if exactly two files are selected, one having the "missing" and the other the "non-versioned" status. Only that way TortoiseSVN can find out which file got renamed to which file.

https://tortoisesvn.net/repairmoves.html

After reverting & deletion of A.txt you end up with a missing file (A.txt) and a non-versioned file (B.txt) again, as before the incorrect applied repair move. So you can apply repair move again between these two files.

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  • 1
    Thanks for your answer. This is also linking the history of A to C, but I guess I'm just asking for an easy solution to something where TortoiseSVN is doing quite some work in the background (repair move) and it doesn't support an easy fix. This additional history link might be a non-issue.
    – grek40
    Mar 9 '17 at 7:32
  • Ah, you're right - after committingC gets the history of A too! This is strange, because svn stat doesn't list > moved from A.txt for the file C before committing in this case. Anyway, I'm glad it has been helpful.
    – Constantin
    Mar 9 '17 at 8:30

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