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Folks,

I have a realsense SR300, but when I display my depth image in a opencv window, it looks too dark. How can I fix this? When I run the realsense examples the images look good, but the examples use OpenGL. But I need OpenCV for my projects. Here is my code:

int main(int argc, char ** argv)
{
  // realsense camera setup
  rs::log_to_console(rs::log_severity::warn);
  // Create a context object. This object owns the handles to all connected realsense devices
  rs::context ctx;
  if (ctx.get_device_count() == 0)
  {
    throw std::runtime_error("No device detected. Is it plugged in?");
  }
  // Access the first available RealSense device
  rs::device * dev = ctx.get_device(0);
  // Configure depth to run at VGA resolution at 30 frames per second
  dev->enable_stream(rs::stream::depth, 640, 480, rs::format::z16, 30);
  rs::intrinsics depth_intrin;
  rs::format depth_format;
  depth_intrin = dev->get_stream_intrinsics(rs::stream::depth);
  depth_format = dev->get_stream_format(rs::stream::depth);
  cv::namedWindow("Send Display Image", CV_WINDOW_AUTOSIZE);

  /* Set callbacks prior to calling start(). */
  auto depth_callback = [depth_intrin, depth_format](rs::frame f)
  {
    cv::Mat image(cv::Size(640, 480), CV_16UC1,
      (void*)f.get_data(), cv::Mat::AUTO_STEP);
    cv::imshow("Send Display Image", image);
    cv::waitKey(1000/80);
  };
  /* callback to grab depth fream and publish it. */
  dev->set_frame_callback(rs::stream::depth, depth_callback);
  // Start streaming
  dev->start();
  While(1)
  {

  }
  return 0;
}

I am not sure why my image is so dark. I want it to look something like the kinect or the Xtion when I run openni_launch from ROS

2
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Edit:

The normalized function below produces some flickering:

  • I suspect that is due to the maximal depth value flickering.
  • The minimal depth value is always 0 as this value is used when the depth is invalid and thus the depth range becomes false.

Instead you should use this:

void make_depth_histogram(const Mat &depth, Mat &normalized_depth) {
  normalized_depth = Mat(depth.size(), CV_8U);
  int width = depth.cols, height = depth.rows;

  static uint32_t histogram[0x10000];
  memset(histogram, 0, sizeof(histogram));

  for(int i = 0; i < height; ++i) {
    for (int j = 0; j < width; ++j) {
      ++histogram[depth.at<ushort>(i,j)];
    }
  }

  for(int i = 2; i < 0x10000; ++i) histogram[i] += histogram[i-1]; // Build a cumulative histogram for the indices in [1,0xFFFF]

  for(int i = 0; i < height; ++i) {
    for (int j = 0; j < width; ++j) {
      if (uint16_t d = depth.at<ushort>(i,j)) {
        int f = histogram[d] * 255 / histogram[0xFFFF]; // 0-255 based on histogram location
        normalized_depth.at<uchar>(i,j) = static_cast<uchar>(f);
      } else {
        normalized_depth.at<uchar>(i,j) = 0;
      }
    }
  }
}

What you observe is because the depth stream is coded on 16 bits (rs::stream::z16) whereas when displayed only 8 bits will be used.

You can normalized your depth map:

double min, max;
minMaxLoc(depth, &min, &max);
Mat depth_normalized;
double alpha = 255.0/(max-min);
depth.convertTo(depth_normalized, CV_8U, alpha, -min*alpha);

Or use a kind of colormap to display the depth: make_depth_histogram().

Full demo code:

inline void make_depth_histogram(const Mat &depth, Mat &color_depth) {
  color_depth = Mat(depth.size(), CV_8UC3);
  int width = depth.cols, height = depth.rows;

  static uint32_t histogram[0x10000];
  memset(histogram, 0, sizeof(histogram));

  for(int i = 0; i < height; ++i) {
    for (int j = 0; j < width; ++j) {
      ++histogram[depth.at<ushort>(i,j)];
    }
  }

  for(int i = 2; i < 0x10000; ++i) histogram[i] += histogram[i-1]; // Build a cumulative histogram for the indices in [1,0xFFFF]

  for(int i = 0; i < height; ++i) {
    for (int j = 0; j < width; ++j) {
      if (uint16_t d = depth.at<ushort>(i,j)) {
        int f = histogram[d] * 255 / histogram[0xFFFF]; // 0-255 based on histogram location
        color_depth.at<Vec3b>(i,j) = Vec3b(f, 0, 255 - f);
      } else {
        color_depth.at<Vec3b>(i,j) = Vec3b(0, 5, 20);
      }
    }
  }
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    // Create a context object. This object owns the handles to all connected realsense devices
    rs::context ctx;

    // Access the first available RealSense device
    rs::device * dev = ctx.get_device(0);

    // Configure Infrared stream to run at VGA resolution at 30 frames per second
    dev->enable_stream(rs::stream::depth, 640, 480, rs::format::z16, 30);

    // Start streaming
    dev->start();

    // Camera warmup - Dropped several first frames to let auto-exposure stabilize
    for(int i = 0; i < 30; i++)
       dev->wait_for_frames();

    // Creating OpenCV Matrix from a color image
    Mat depth(Size(640, 480), CV_16U, (void*)dev->get_frame_data(rs::stream::depth), Mat::AUTO_STEP);

    // Create a color depth
    Mat color_depth;
    make_depth_histogram(depth, color_depth);

    // Create a normalized depth
    double min, max;
    minMaxLoc(depth, &min, &max);
    Mat depth_normalized;
    double alpha = 255.0/(max-min);
    depth.convertTo(depth_normalized, CV_8U, alpha, -min*alpha);

    // Display in a GUI
    imshow("Display normalized depth", depth_normalized);
    imshow("Display color depth", color_depth);

    waitKey(0);

    return 0;
  }
| improve this answer | |
  • When I do the "normalized depth" step, my new 8bit image appears to pulsate, meaning, all pixels in the image get really bright, then really dark (all pixels by the same amount). It's kinda weird. It takes about a second to go really bright, and then another second to go really dark, and repeat. Do you know what that could be? Maybe some auto exposure issue or something with the camera? – Pototo Feb 22 '17 at 1:07
  • When I set the max and min to constants, then the flickering disappears. There is not flickering when I look at an static object. When things move around, flickering happens. It makes sense since at least alpha is always changing. – Pototo May 9 '17 at 22:25
  • You should use make_depth_histogram() to visualize the depth map. It is a little bit more time consuming but the visualization should be used only for debugging purpose anyway. – Catree May 10 '17 at 9:27
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The only solution I found to this problem which gives satisfactory results is the following:

  • Save the image as a PNG file. (PNG supports saving 16 bit images)
  • Use matplotlib to view it in a colored map.

    #!/usr/bin/python3
    import numpy as np
    import cv2
    import sys
    from matplotlib import pyplot as plt
    
    def printCoordinates(event):
        x,y = event.xdata,event.ydata
        if x != None:
            print("X : ",x," Y: ",y," Value = ",img[np.int(y),np.int(x)])
    
    img = cv2.imread(sys.argv[1],cv2.CV_16UC1)
    #img = img/65535
    
    fig = plt.figure()
    plt.imshow(img,cmap='nipy_spectral')
    cid = fig.canvas.mpl_connect('button_press_event',printCoordinates)
    plt.colorbar()
    plt.show()
    

The button_press_event is to print the exact pixel value on the pixel clicked.

RGB Image RGB Image Corresponding Depth Image Corresponding Depth Image

| improve this answer | |

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