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What's the difference between a blue/green deployment and a rolling deployment? I always thought that a blue/green deployment was a sudden switch of traffic from the old version to the new version immediately.

This talk about Blue/Green deployment on AWS shows various different strategies to implement a blue/green deployment, but they also seem to match the definition of a rolling deployment.

Is a blue/green deployment a subset of rolling deployments?

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    Rolling deployments are staggered. Blue/green is a sudden switch after canary testing. Commented Feb 21, 2017 at 12:57
  • That's my understanding as well, but if you watch the AWS video by the solution architects their solutions for blue/green aren't sudden and are gradual hence my question.
    – n00b
    Commented Feb 22, 2017 at 22:04
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    You have to realize a lot of this is opinion and theory. The idea for both of these is that you minimize production downtime for an application. You should make sure you are always able to "see the forest for the trees" here. Get the idea of how both of these work and then adapt them to best fit your environment. Commented Feb 22, 2017 at 22:24
  • Usecase matters while choosing the type of the deployment. For stateful applications, green/blue model is preferred where the entire application maintains the state of the system. Commented Mar 30, 2022 at 20:56

4 Answers 4

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I have written an essay on this topic here: http://blog.itaysk.com/2017/11/20/deployment-strategies-defined

In my opinion the difference is whether the new version is applied by replacing instances in the existing setup (in the case of rolling upgrade), or a completely isolated setup is created for the new version (in the case of Blue/Green). In my opinion Blue/Green is the safest strategy and is better in most cases for production deployments. Read the post for a detailed comparison.

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  • For production deployments, blue green is better? I think docker based production environments are more approachable for rolling upgrade Commented Mar 15, 2020 at 2:17
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    This answer is quite old but I would still say the b/g is safer if it works for you. You can do blue/green with docker: if you had two containers serving traffic and you created a new couple of containers to serve the new version, and then swapped the traffic so not the new couple is active, that's b/g. But if you had two containers and you upgraded one at a time, then this is rolling.
    – itaysk
    Commented Mar 15, 2020 at 10:37
  • It is not just the number of containers, we run containers in AWS vpc. B/G will create call those resources (subnets/security groups etc...) Which is unnecessary... Isn't it? Commented Mar 15, 2020 at 14:36
  • if you meant to say that there will be redundancy - then yes this is how b/g works. for the duration of the migration you will need to run (and pay for) both versions of the application. However, what is the granularity of "the application" is up to you to decide, and this is also discussed in the blog post. it doesn't have to be the entire network environment. if you prefer, it could be at the scope of "a service", which may be just a couple of containers and a virtual load balancer. upgrading a single service in isolation may be easy or hard depending on how well your system is designed.
    – itaysk
    Commented Mar 15, 2020 at 20:08
  • Do you happen to know how to answer this one as well? stackoverflow.com/questions/78062541/…
    – CodeMonkey
    Commented Feb 26 at 17:40
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In Blue Green Deployment, you have TWO complete environments.

One is Blue environment which is running and the Green environment to which you want to upgrade. Once you swap the environment from blue to green, the traffic is directed to your new green environment. You can delete or save your old blue environment for backup until the green environment is stable.

In Rolling Deployment, you have only ONE complete environment.

Once you start upgrading your environment. The code is deployed in the subset of instances of the same environment and moves to another subset after completion.

So both are different in various factors and you need to choose the deployment model based on the scenario. Blue/green deployment is not a subset of rolling deployments.

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Blue-Green Deployment:

There are two environments, Blue environment which is "old" and contains one or more applications(instances or containers) and Green environment which is "new" and contains one or more applications(instances or containers).

Then, 100% traffic is quickly switched from Blue environment to Green environment at once as shown below:

enter image description here This image above is from https://www.encora.com/insights/zero-downtime-deployment-techniques-blue-green-deployments originally created by the company "Encora"

enter image description here This image above is from https://avikdas.com/2020/06/30/scalability-concepts-zero-downtime-deployments.html originally created by Avik Das

In addition, there is Canary Deployment which is gradual way of Blue-Green Deployment. In this case of Canary Deployment, 100% traffic is gradually switched from Blue environment to Green environment taking a longer time(30 minutes, hours, or days) than Blue-Green Deployment as shown below:

enter image description here This image above is from https://www.encora.com/insights/zero-downtime-deployment-techniques-canary-deployments originally created by the company "Encora"

Rolling Deployment:

There is one environment which contains one or more "old" applications(instances or containers).

Then, one by one, one or more "old" applications(instances or containers) are replaced with one or more "new" applications(instances or containers) as shown below:

enter image description here This image above is from https://avikdas.com/2020/06/30/scalability-concepts-zero-downtime-deployments.html originally created by Avik Das

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  • Could you explain what an environment stands for please ? If I need to upgrade a specific microservice in my cluster I would target the deployment of that microservice so the only option I can choose would be Rolling Deployment as I'm not able to see in this case what could be an environment.
    – javaxiss
    Commented Jul 23, 2022 at 10:42
  • Do you happen to know how to answer this one as well? stackoverflow.com/questions/78062541/…
    – CodeMonkey
    Commented Feb 26 at 17:40
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Another niche use-case that we had to consider when choosing between them is the load-balancer behavior.

If we use a standard round-robin balancer, during deployment the same user will probably jump between old and new instances of the application, which may or may not be a problem.

In our case, we had to reload the page each time to fetch the corresponding frontend version, which didn't feel nice. This, in turn, forced us to enable stickiness in the balancer (the user is served by the same instance as long as it's available). But stickiness introduced uneven load, where some instances were completely overloaded and others were idle.

So, we had to switch to blue-green deployment to make sure that there is no back-and-forth version switching during the deployment.

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