I have a custom setter in my Lombok-based POJO:

@Data
@Builder
public class User {
    private static final PasswordEncoder ENCODER = new BCryptPasswordEncoder();

    private String password = null;

    public void setPassword(String password) {
        Assert.notNull(password);
        this.password = ENCODER.encode(password);
    }

but when I use the Lombok generated builder:

User user = User.builder()
    .password(password)
    .build();

my custom setter is not invoked, and so the password is not encoded. This makes me sad.

My custom setter is, of course, invoked when I use it directly:

public void changePassword(String password, User user) {
    user.setPassword(password);
}

What can I do to have Lombok's builder use my custom setter?

up vote 28 down vote accepted

Per the documentation for @Builder: Just define enough skeleton yourself. In particular, Lombok will generate a class UserBuilder, fields mirroring the User fields, and builder methods, and you can provide any or all of this yourself.

@Builder
public class User {
    private static final PasswordEncoder ENCODER = new BCryptPasswordEncoder();

    private String username;

    private String password;

    public static class UserBuilder {
        public UserBuilder password(String password) {
            this.password = ENCODER.encode(password);
            return this;
        }
    }
}
  • 2
    Thanks, chrylis -- but how does Person::setPassword (from Lombok's @Data) and Person.PersonBuilder::password share a DRY implementation? – Jan Nielsen Feb 22 '17 at 0:38
  • @JanNielsen You really can't--the point of Builder is to prepopulate all of the data. Frequently, in fact, it's used with an immutable class. You might consider the "constructor" approach, calling this.setPassword() from the User class and disregarding coding issues entirely in the builder. – chrylis Feb 22 '17 at 0:55
  • @JanNielsen The more I think about it, the more it seems to make sense to make the caller responsible for encoding the password. There's just too much going on in encoding it in a property setter. Among other things, you can't set the hashed password without using direct field access. – chrylis Feb 22 '17 at 3:02
  • chrylis, perhaps in this case. In general, @Data with @Builder and a custom setter seems useful but Lombok makes it difficult to make it DRY -- the only solution I can think of is a helper class to collect logic but if there's state then this state must be made visible to the helper -- not very satisfy... – Jan Nielsen Feb 22 '17 at 3:19
  • @JanNielsen Or, if you must conjoin them (Spring Security, for example, prefers to handle encoding itself), have a distinct changePassword method. – chrylis Feb 22 '17 at 3:36

I've accepted chrylis's answer but for completeness, here's are some ways to minimize customization and duplication.

Custom setter and builder with static helper

A static helper can be used to shares most of the set password functionality across the custom User.UserBuilder::password method and the custom User::setPassword method:

@Data
@Builder
public class User {
    private static final PasswordEncoder ENCODER = new BCryptPasswordEncoder();

    private String password = null;

    public void setPassword(String password) {
        this.password = _encodePassword(password);
    }

    public static class UserBuilder {
        public UserBuilder password(String password) {
            this.password = _encodePassword(password)
            return this;
        }
    }

    private static String _encodePassword(String password) {
        Assert.notNull(password);
        return ENCODER.encode(password);
    }
}

Custom setter and constructor

A custom constructor can use User::setPassword which is invoked by the Lombok generated User.UserBuilder::build():

@Data
@Builder
public class User {
    private static final PasswordEncoder ENCODER = new BCryptPasswordEncoder();

    private String password = null;

    User(String password) {
        setPassword(password);
    }

    public void setPassword(String password) {
        Assert.notNull(password);
        this.password = ENCODER.encode(password);
    }
}

Custom setter and constructor with static helper

Or, a little more elegantly, with a custom constructor and a static helper method:

@Data
@Builder
public class User {
    private static final PasswordEncoder ENCODER = new BCryptPasswordEncoder();

    private String password = null;

    User(String password) {
        _encodePassword(password, this);
    }

    public void setPassword(String password) {
        _encodePassword(password, this);
    }

    private static _encodePassword(String password, User user) {
        Assert.notNull(password);
        user.password = ENCODER.encode(password);
    }
}
  • Very informative. Unfortunately the constructor of the Custom setter and constructor example needs to take as many arguments as the class's field which can become rather messy.. – Niccolò Sep 27 at 13:50

You are using setPassword rather than the builder's set method.

Here is what worked for me:

import lombok.Builder;
import lombok.Data;

@Builder
@Data
public class User {
    private String username;
    private String password;

    public static class UserBuilder {
        private String password;
        public UserBuilder password(String password ) {
            this.password ="ENCRIYP " +  password;
            return this;
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(User.builder().username("This is my username").password("Password").build().toString());

    }
}

The result was: User(username=This is my username, password=ENCRIYP Password)

  • Thanks, Borjan! It looks like chrylis beat you to the same answer... – Jan Nielsen Feb 22 '17 at 0:03

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.