Is it easier to place test files right next to the source files they test (in the same src directory), or should a separate tests directory with a mirror hierarchy be created?

Having them in the same folder seems to make life easier when it comes to maintenance, but also crowds the source directories.

Option 1: Directory structure when having separate folders for source and tests:

- src
+-- item.ts
`-- util
    +-- helper.ts

- test
+-- item.test.ts
`-- util
    `-- helper.test.ts

Option 2: Directory structure when having both types of files in the same directory:

- src
+-- item.ts
+-- item.test.ts
`-- util
    +-- helper.ts
    `-- helper.test.ts

I used to always go with option 1 until trying out angular-cli and having it generate code files alongside the test files as in option 2, which made me rethink the whole thing.

closed as primarily opinion-based by Lelio Faieta, n00dl3, Mike Cole, Ishmael, Fred Apr 11 '17 at 15:41

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 3
    First, Based on DRY, the option 2 help us don't make 2 changes if there are any directory name changes. Second, Personally, I like option 2 because it's much easier for TDD. – David Guan Feb 22 '17 at 8:15
  • @DavidGuan That makes sense, but it does make the code less "organized", in a sense. I feel like the directory naming wouldn't be an issue if there was some tooling to mirror directory structure. – UghSegment Feb 22 '17 at 8:22
  • I'd say option 1, although you do end up repeating yourself it makes your builds easier/faster as you can just ignore one folder instead of having to check every file, but that may only be milliseconds. I don't think it makes a huge amount of difference, so just go with what you feel works best with you. – George Feb 22 '17 at 8:32

Option #2 is the way I'd go.

When thinking about the Angular 2 components, I consider them to be a single entity, made up of multiple files. You don't move your HTML / CSS files out to some other directory, away from the component, so why move the unit tests?

I've written a small utility plugin for VSCode that I personally find quite useful - it compresses an Angular 2 component into a single entry on the Explorer view, and adds icons / context menu options for getting to the template / css / unit tests. This helps me see the component as a single unit, comprising multiple parts. Maybe something like that would help keep your directory "clean" if that's what you worry about?

I would encourage you to think about unit tests as PART OF your code, rather than in addition to. They'll be very useful if you can keep on top of them.

  • My question isn't specific to Angular 2 at all. – UghSegment Feb 23 '17 at 4:54
  • In that case it's surely just preference – Askanison4 Feb 23 '17 at 10:56
  • 1
    Upvoted for "think about unit tests as PART of your code" – The Dembinski Jun 27 '17 at 6:20
  • Then where will you put the test related sources? For example, test mock file? – JasmineOT Apr 18 at 23:51
  • In my Angular apps I keep my common mock files located under /src/test/ because that's alongside the test.ts file which is used to collect all the tests together. You just have to make sure to exclude the directory in your tsconfig.json – Askanison4 Apr 19 at 9:17

My personal recommendation is to go with #1. The reasons are:

  1. Your source code is not 'polluted' with code that is not related to actual business logic. Mind that it is not so uncommon to have more than one test file for the same class/module.
  2. There are more that just unit tests you are probably going to write. What about e2e? Are they going to be placed along side corresponding 'something', as they are not so bound to the particular file? So you risk end up cluttering your tests over whole project - some of them in one place and some in other. Separation of all tests in the dedicated directory - solves this issue.
  3. Its easy to prepare the deploy of the project. Otherwise you will have to somehow strip out all tests from the transpiled sources.

Do not trust me on this - have a look at the established projects like

  • 4
    I have to disagree here: even the Angular 2 project itself sets up this way. Tests don't "pollute" your code. Tests ARE your code. Unit tests for individual components are useful, and rather than keeping a mirror of your main code directory solely for tests, you can find the unit test you're looking for right there where you'd expect it. – Askanison4 Feb 22 '17 at 11:32
  • 1
    We are talking different things. I would really like not to go into wars what approach it "the one" therefore my answer starts with "My personal recommendation". Regarding angular2 - just by taking the first folder from their git repository: github.com/angular/angular/tree/master/modules/%40angular/… we see clear separation of tests and sorce code into two distinct nested folders. And the same for each "module". – Amid Feb 22 '17 at 11:38
  • That's a fair point. I hadn't noticed that the Angular project itself differed from the CLI project. I wonder what the rationale for that is. I agree that this is mostly opinion-based, but the OP mentioned they're using Angular-CLI, and sticking to conventions in that regard will be beneficial in the long run (considering upgrades etc) – Askanison4 Feb 22 '17 at 11:42
  • Further to this, point #2: e2e ARE separated in the Angular-CLI project, so this is taken care of (since e2e don't correspond to a specific component). #3: the .spec.ts files are already removed from the output JS so this isn't an issue the OP has to be aware of. – Askanison4 Feb 22 '17 at 11:44
  • 1
    personal preferations aside, your tests are part of your business logic (#1). You can see your tests as the definitions of the business rules and your production code as their implementations. When I take a first look at a project I mostly look at the tests as they explain the code better than the code itself sometimes does (assuming they are well written). For #2, you put e2e tests in a seperate folder, as you would do now. I Don't see the problem in combining both philosophies? #3 Adding 1 extra exclusion in your build config doesn't seem like a lot of work to me :) – Geert Bellemans Mar 7 at 8:28

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