1

I have been trying to create a templated class(Test2) that takes 2 template arguments,Type1 and Type2. It is known that the second argument would also be a templated class that takes 2 template arguments(TypeA and TypeB).

Now, for constructing an object of Test2, I want the user to be able to use either of 2 types of constructors:

  1. One that takes objects of Type1 and Type2.
  2. One that takes objects of Type1, TypeA and TypeB.

I wrote the following code:

#include <iostream>

template<class TypeA, class TypeB>
struct Test
{
    TypeA t1obj;
    TypeB t2obj;
    Test(const TypeA& t1, const TypeB& t2)
        : t1obj(t1), t2obj(t2) {std::cout<<"Test::Type1, Type2\n";}
};


template<class Type1,
         template<typename TypeX, typename TypeY> class Type2 >
struct Test2
{
    Type1 t1obj;
    Type2<typename TypeX, typename TypeY> t2obj; //Line 17

    Test2(const Type1& t1,
          const Type2<typename TypeX, typename TypeY>& t2) //Line 20
        : t1obj(t1), t2obj(t2) { std::cout<<"Test2::Type1, Type2\n";}

    Test2(const Type1& t1,
          const TypeX& x,
          const TypeY& y)
        : t1obj(t1), t2obj(x,y) { std::cout<<"Test2::Type1, X, Y\n";}

};

int main()
{
    Test<int, char> obj1(1,'a');

    Test2<int, Test<int, char> > strangeobj1(10,obj1);
    Test2<int, Test<int, char> > strangeobj2(1,2,'b');

}

I have tried a lot but I get really absurd errors like:

wrong number of template arguments (1, should be 2) on Line 17 and 20.

3
  • 1
    Make sure you post the first error message. The rest might be bogus. And please indicate its line in the code.
    – sbi
    Nov 21, 2010 at 17:44
  • @sbi: The error I mentioned is the first error I get. Nov 21, 2010 at 18:13
  • That wasn't clear from your description, so I thought I'd mention it.
    – sbi
    Nov 21, 2010 at 20:18

5 Answers 5

6

It doesn't work like that. Test<int, char> is a full blown type, instead of a template. So you need type parameters

template<class Type1,
         class Type2 >
struct Test2
{
    Type1 t1obj;
    Type2 t2obj; //Line 17

    Test2(const Type1& t1,
          const Type2& t2) //Line 20
        : t1obj(t1), t2obj(t2) { std::cout<<"Test2::Type1, Type2\n";}

    Test2(const Type1& t1,
          const typename Type2::a_type& x,
          const typename Type2::b_type& y)
        : t1obj(t1), t2obj(x,y) { std::cout<<"Test2::Type1, X, Y\n";}

};

For getting TypeX and TypeY it's useful to export them so you can use them in Test2 as shown above.

template<class TypeA, class TypeB>
struct Test
{
    typedef TypeA a_type;
    typedef TypeB b_type;

    // and using them, to show their meaning
    a_type t1obj;
    b_type t2obj;

    Test(const a_type& t1, const b_type& t2)
        : t1obj(t1), t2obj(t2) {std::cout<<"Test::Type1, Type2\n";}
};

Be sure to read Where to put the "template" and "typename" on dependent names to understand why and when to use typename before type names like above.

13
  • But, why doesn't template template arguments work here to catch the arguments provided to Type2?? Could you also explicate the reason for that error I mentioned? Nov 21, 2010 at 17:48
  • I guess C++0x variadic templates would be pretty useful here, Test2 wouldn't have to know anything about the arguments needed by Type2's constructor.
    – Ben Voigt
    Nov 21, 2010 at 17:53
  • @Ben correct. We could write a partial specialization of Test2 which will deduce the template arguments automagically, without relying on fixed named typedefs to get them. Nov 21, 2010 at 17:56
  • 1
    @Saurabh it's like expecting a function pointer to give you the value of its arguments it is called with. That makes no sense, because you can call a function multiple times with different argument values. void f(void(*pf)(int a)) { int i = a; /* this doesn't work for similar reasons */ }. Just like you can instantiate a template with multiple argument values. The declaration of your template template parameter can equivalently be written as template<typename, typename> class Type2. The inner parameter names have no meaning. Nov 21, 2010 at 17:57
  • 1
    @Saurabh to the rescue for what? You haven't presented an ultimate goal. Nov 21, 2010 at 18:07
1

There are several errors with this, but the main error seems to be that

Test2<int, Test<int, char> >

is not how you pass a template template parameter. This would be passed using

Test2<int, Test>

That is because Test is a template but Test<int, char> is a type (generated from that template.)

0

Type1 is a type, Type2 is a template. What exactly do you think TypeX and TypeY are defined? Inside the line template<typename TypeX, typename TypeY> class Type2 >, they are ignored.

0

Here's one option:

#include <iostream>

template<class TypeA, class TypeB>
struct Test
{
    TypeA t1obj;
    TypeB t2obj;
    Test(const TypeA& t1, const TypeB& t2)
        : t1obj(t1), t2obj(t2) {std::cout<<"Test::Type1, Type2\n";}
};


template<class Type1, typename TypeX, typename TypeY,
         template <typename TypeXi, typename TypeYi> class Type2>
struct Test2
{
    Type1 t1obj;
    Type2<typename TypeX, typename TypeY> t2obj; //Line 17

    Test2(const Type1& t1,
          const Type2<typename TypeX, typename TypeY>& t2) //Line 20
        : t1obj(t1), t2obj(t2) { std::cout<<"Test2::Type1, Type2\n";}

    Test2(const Type1& t1,
          const TypeX& x,
          const TypeY& y)
        : t1obj(t1), t2obj(x,y) { std::cout<<"Test2::Type1, X, Y\n";}

};

int main()
{
    Test<int, char> obj1(1,'a');

    Test2<int, int, char, Test> strangeobj1(10,obj1);
    Test2<int, int, char, Test> strangeobj2(1,2,'b');

}
5
  • It's Type2<TypeX, TypeY>, not Type2<typename TypeX, typename TypeY>. TypeX and TypeY are not dependent names.
    – Ben Voigt
    Nov 21, 2010 at 17:50
  • Perhaps. The compiler doesn't seem to care.
    – Reinderien
    Nov 21, 2010 at 17:55
  • @Ben see stackoverflow.com/questions/4231502/… . They are dependent unqualified names. That's why it's syntactically invalid. Please let me hear your opinion on that FAQ entry. Nov 21, 2010 at 18:01
  • @Johannes: Um, yeah. Either way, they're not qualified by a template parameter, so typename is invalid. @Reinderien: Your compiler is not standard compliant.
    – Ben Voigt
    Nov 21, 2010 at 18:06
  • @Johannes: FAQ looks good. Only improvement I could suggest is an explanation of why typename appears only once, always to the left, away from the type it modifies, while template appears in the middle of the scope chain and potentially multiple times.
    – Ben Voigt
    Nov 21, 2010 at 18:10
0

Test<int, char> is not a match for template<typename TypeX, typename TypeY> class Type2

The first one is an instantiation of a template class, it does not accept any parameters. The second one is a template class pattern accepting two parameters.

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