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It seems like a good design decision that the System.Object class, and hence all classes, in .NET provide a ToString() method which, unsurprisingly, returns a string representation of the object. Additionally in C# this method is implemented for native types so that they integrate nicely with the type system.

This often comes in handy when user interaction is required. For example, objects can directly be held in GUI widgets like lists and are "automatically" displayed as text.

What is the rationale in the language design to not provide a similarly general object.FromString(string) method?

Other questions and their answers discuss possible objections, but I find them not convincing.

  • The parse could fail, while a conversion to string is always possible.

    • Well, that does not keep Parse() methods from existing, does it? If exception handling is considered an undesirable design, one could still define a TryParse() method whose standard implementation for System.Object simply returns false, but which is overridden for concrete types where it makes sense (e.g. the types where this method exists today anyway).

    • Alternatively, at a minimum it would be nice to have an IParseable interface which declares a ParseMe() or TryParse() method, along the lines of ICloneable.

  • Comment by Tim Schmelter's "Roll your own": That works of course. But I cannot write general code for native types or, say, IPAddress if I must parse the values; instead I have to resort to type introspection or write wrappers which implement a self-defined interface, which is either maintenance-unfriendly or tedious and error-prone.

  • Comment by Damien: An interface can only declare non-static functions for reasons discussed here by Eric Lippert. This is a very valid objection. A static TryParse() method cannot be specified in an interface. A virtual ParseMe(string) method though needs a dummy object, which is a kludge at best and impossible at worst (with RAII). I almost suspect that this is the main reason such an interface doesn't exist. Instead there is the elaborate type conversion framework, one of the alternatives mentioned as solutions to the "static interface" oxymoron.

But even given the objections listed, the absence of a general parsing facility in the type system or language appears to me as an awkward asymmetry, given that a general ToString() method exists and is extremely useful.

Was that ever discussed during language/CLR design?

closed as primarily opinion-based by Servy, Pmpr, rene, Shiva, Glenn Slayden Feb 22 '17 at 21:55

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    In order for IParsable to work, you'd need to obtain an instance first. If you problem is "turn this string into an instance of X", it feels somewhat awkward that you first need to obtain some other instance of X just so that you can call FromString() on it. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Feb 22 '17 at 15:09
  • What exactly would be the default behavior for that, just throw an exception? – juharr Feb 22 '17 at 15:09
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    You can convert only few types from string to OtherType but you can convert every type to string. What is the benefit of it? You can always provide a constructor or factory method (f.e. with TryParse pattern) that creates an instance from a string if that's desired and possible. – Rango Feb 22 '17 at 15:09
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    Please see this post which answers your question. – Koby Douek Feb 22 '17 at 15:09
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    Possible duplicate of How to reverse a .ToString() call – Koby Douek Feb 22 '17 at 15:10
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It seems like a good design decision that the System.object class, and hence all classes, in .NET provide a ToString() method

Maybe to you. It's always seemed like a really bad idea to me.

which, unsurprisingly, returns a string representation of the object.

Does it though? For the vast majority of types, ToString returns the name of the type. How is that a string representation of the object?

No, ToString was a bad design in the first place. It has no clear contract. There's no clear guidance on what its semantics should be, aside from having no side effects and producing a string.

Since ToString has no clear contract, there is practically nothing you can safely use it for except for debugger output. I mean really, think about it: when was the last time you called ToString on object in production code? I never have.

The better design therefore would have been methods static string ToString<T>(T) and static string ToString(object) on the Debug class. Those could have then produced "null" if the object is null, or done some reflection on T to determine if there is a debugger visualizer for that object, and so on.

So now let's consider the merits of your actual proposal, which is a general requirement that all objects be deserializable from string. Note that first, obviously this is not the inverse operation of ToString. The vast majority of implementations of ToString do not produce anything that you could use even in theory to reconstitute the object.

So is your proposal that ToString and FromString be inverses? That then requires that every object not just be "represented" as a string, but that it actually be round trip serializable to string.

Let's think of an example. I have an object representing a database table. Does ToString on that table now serialize the entire contents of the table? Does FromString deserialize it? Suppose the object is actually a wrapper around a connection that fetches the table on demand; what do we serialize and deserialize then? If the connection needs my password, does it put my password into the string?

Suppose I have an object that refers to another object, such that I cannot deserialize the first object without also having the second in hand. Is serialization recursive across objects? What about objects where the graph of references contains loops; how do we deal with those?

Serialization is difficult, and that's why there are entire libraries devoted to it. Making it a requirement that all types be serializable and deserializable is onerous.

Even supposing that we wanted to do so, why string of all things? Strings are a terrible serialization data type. They can't easily hold binary data, they have to be entirely present in memory at once, they can't be more than a billion characters tops, they have no structure to them, and so on. What you really want for serialization is a structured binary storage system.

But even given the objections listed, the absence of a general parsing facility in the type system or language appears to me as an awkward asymmetry, given that a general ToString() method exists and is extremely useful.

Those are two completely different things that have nothing to do with each other. One is a super hard problem best solved by libraries devoted to it, and the other is a trivial little debugging aid with no specification constraining its output.

Was that ever discussed during language/CLR design?

Was ToString ever discussed? Obviously it was; it got implemented. Was a generalized serialization library ever discussed? Obviously it was; it got implemented. I'm not sure what you're getting at here.

  • Thanks for the detailed response. (1) Re "ToString() mainly useful for debugging": I also rely on it in my GUIs (e.g. objects in Lists, datagrids). (2) Your objections regarding round-trip semantics/serialization: Point taken. But I didn't suggest that for the general case. (That is, object.Parse() always fails.) There is a spectrum of types though -- e.g. all native types -- that do have a round-trip text representation. And like with ICloneable, against which objections regarding the non-contract have been made as well: It's up to the user to define it with the desired semantics. – Peter A. Schneider Feb 22 '17 at 16:30
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Why is there no inverse to object.ToString()?

Because object should hold the bare minimum functionality required by every object. Comparing equality and converting to string (for a lot of reasons) are two of them. Converting isn't. The problem is: how should it convert? Using JSON? Binary? XML? Something else? There isn't one uniform way to convert from a string. Hence, this would unnecessarily bloat the object class.

Alternatively, at a minimum it would be nice to have an IParseable interface

There is: IXmlSerializable for example, or one of the many alternatives.

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