2

I am quite new to R, so apologies in advance if I state something wrong :)

I have a dataframe consisting of 395 rows and 4973 columns, sorted by months, with number of occurrence per month (ranges from 0 to eg 25) for a lot of companies. The number of occurrence was summarised from daily data grouped by month and year. My dataframe df looks something like that (only a few months and 3 companies):

Date     FirmA FirmB FirmC
01-2015  20    NA    20
02-2015  21    2     1
03-2015  22    3     2
04-2015  24    7     5
05-2015  10    10    10
06-2015  9     20    2
07-2015  13    22    1
08-2015  20    19    1

I have now the task to sum up the occurences per company by a three month rolling window from months t-3 to t-1 (the 3 previous months). However, the sum should have following conditions. It should have at least 10 occurrences during the three month window and at least 3 occurrences in month t-1. It doesn't matter if an NA is in t-3 and/or t-2, as long as the two conditions are met.

It should look like that.

Date     FirmA FirmB FirmC
01-2015  NA    NA    NA
02-2015  20    NA    20
03-2015  41    NA    NA
04-2015  63    NA    NA
05-2015  67    12    NA
06-2015  56    20    17
07-2015  43    37    NA
08-2015  32    52    NA

I have no clue, how to approach that, especially the combination of rolling window/sum (probably something with lag) and the conditions regarding which numbers to use and which not.

  • with dplyr you can define window functions – c0bra Feb 22 '17 at 16:34
  • I'm be really curious to see an efficient rolling-window implementation in dplyr; though I'm confident it's feasible, its windowing is not designed to roll. – r2evans Feb 22 '17 at 16:47
2

Here's a method that uses zoo::rollapply:

df <- structure(list(Date = c("01-2015", "02-2015", "03-2015", "04-2015", 
"05-2015", "06-2015", "07-2015", "08-2015"), FirmA = c(20L, 21L, 
22L, 24L, 10L, 9L, 13L, 20L), FirmB = c(NA, 2L, 3L, 7L, 10L, 
20L, 22L, 19L), FirmC = c(20L, 1L, 2L, 5L, 10L, 2L, 1L, 1L)), .Names = c("Date", 
"FirmA", "FirmB", "FirmC"), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(NA, 
-8L))

library(zoo)

mysum <- function(x, minprev = 3) {
  l <- length(x)
  if (l==1 || (! is.na(x[l-1]) && x[l-1] >= minprev)) sum(x[-l], na.rm = TRUE) else NA
}

winsize <- 3
# conditionally-sum
df[-1] <- lapply(df[-1], function(z) rollapply(z, winsize + 1, mysum, partial = TRUE, align = "right"))
# remove those that are insufficient in total
df[-1] <- lapply(df[-1], function(z) ifelse(z <= 10, NA, z))
df
#      Date FirmA FirmB FirmC
# 1 01-2015    NA    NA    NA
# 2 02-2015    20    NA    20
# 3 03-2015    41    NA    NA
# 4 04-2015    63    NA    NA
# 5 05-2015    67    12    NA
# 6 06-2015    56    20    17
# 7 07-2015    43    37    NA
# 8 08-2015    32    52    NA

There may be a way to not require mysum, but two things make it slightly tricky: (1) the resulting sum goes in the next field (more easily side-stepped if the window is always length 3), and (2) the conditional on the last value. It's certainly feasible to try to smooth it out, but this works well enough.

  • Amazing, that helped a lot. Thank you so much! Works flawless with my actual dataframe. – Henky Feb 23 '17 at 6:58
1

Another approach, similar in concept to r2evans', is to compute the rolling sum through cumsum (after replacing NAs with 0s) and insert NAs when conditions are not met:

ff = function(x, w = 3, ntot = 10, nlast = 3)
{
    x[is.na(x)] = 0L
    x = c(0L, x[-length(x)])

    cs = cumsum(x)
    wcs = cs - c(numeric(w), cs[1:(length(x) - w)])

    wcs[!((wcs >= ntot) & (x >= nlast))] = NA
    return(wcs)

}

sapply(df[-1], ff)  # 'df' borrowed from r2evans' answer
#     FirmA FirmB FirmC
#[1,]    NA    NA    NA
#[2,]    20    NA    20
#[3,]    41    NA    NA
#[4,]    63    NA    NA
#[5,]    67    12    NA
#[6,]    56    20    17
#[7,]    43    37    NA
#[8,]    32    52    NA
  • Thank you too for your solution. I just go with the solution of r2evans because I tried it first and it works. I have to tackle the next obstacles now ;) – Henky Feb 23 '17 at 7:00
  • @Henky I think this one might be much faster. Also note there is frollapply coming to data.table, but still this one using cumsum is likely to be fastest one. – jangorecki Sep 1 at 12:16

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