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I am getting confused comparing Java and C++ references:

In the below code in java the Point p object is still pointing to the (5,5) object after calling changePoint.

This is because the temp variable (in chagePoint) is allocated on the stack and holds a reference to the p object (in main) in the heap but when we reassign temp it just points to another point object in the heap without changing where the original Point p object in main is pointing to.

public static void main(String [] args) {
    Point p = new Point(5,5);
    changePoint(p);
}

changePoint(Point temp) {
    temp = new Point(4,6);
}

Now in C++ if we do the same thing what happens to the (5,5) object in main after exeucting those two statements in changePoint? When you do *temp = new Point(4,5) it will simply override the (5,5) object that p is pointing to from main correct? But when you do temp = new Point(4,5) will the (5,5) object in main will be a memory leak?

int main() {
    Point *p = new Point(5,5);
    changePoint(&p);
}

changePoint(Point *temp) {
    *temp = new Point(4,5);
    temp = new Point (5,6);
}
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    −1 Your code will not compile. Please only post real code. It's meaningless to discuss what code that wouldn't compile, would do if it compiled. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Feb 22 '17 at 18:06
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    To remove confusion, don't compare them. They are different languages. The C++ language has pointers and references, and they are different. – Thomas Matthews Feb 22 '17 at 18:06
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    Your C++ code isn't using references, it is using pointers. The pointers are passed to the function by copy. Your function is not modifying the content of the original pointer variable. – Thomas Matthews Feb 22 '17 at 18:08
  • @1290 *temp = new Point(4,5); overrides contents of instance where temp is pointing to. temp = new Point (5,6); overrides temp but it is provided by value. Change signature of changePoint to changePoint(Point *&temp) to make temp a reference parameter. Check this out in your debugger... – Scheff Feb 22 '17 at 18:09
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    Your Java explanation seems overly complicated. p is passed to changePoint by value - it receives a copy of the reference. Then it assigns to that copy, so the original reference is unchanged. Nothing in there relates to the actual Point object referred to by either reference. And this is exactly how pointers work in C++. – chris Feb 22 '17 at 18:32
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You should understand the following before comparing to Java:

  1. C++ pass by reference vs. pass by value (copy).
  2. Pointers to pointers.

In C++ if you want to modify the variable that was passed to a function, you need to pass by reference:

void func1(int& value)
{
  value = 5;
}
void another_function()
{
  int number = 0;
  func(number);
  std::cout << "The value of number is: " << number << "\n";
}

The value of number will be changed by func because the variable is passed by reference.

If you want to modify variable using pointers instead of references, you will need to pass a pointer:

void func2(int * pointer_to_value)
{
  *pointer_to_value = 16;
}
void caller()
{
  int number = 0;
  func2(&number);
  std::cout << "The value of number is: " << number << "\n";
}

If you want to change a pointer, without passing by reference, you need to pass a pointer to the pointer:

void func3(int * * pointer_to_point_to_value)
{
  *pointer_to_pointer_to_value = new int;
  **pointer_to_pointer_to_value = 23;
}
void caller3()
{
  int * pointer_to_number;
  func3(&pointer_to_number);
  cout << "Number is: " **pointer_to_number << "\n";
}

A simpler method is to pass a pointer by reference:

void func4(int * & pointer_to_value)
{
  pointer_to_value = new int;
  *pointer_to_value = 17;
}
void caller4()
{
  int * pointer_to_number;
  func4(pointer_to_number);
}

As far as arrays go, simplify your life and use std::vector. Pass the vector variable by reference or if you won't modify it, by constant reference.

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