2

I'm using Docker 1.13.1 for Mac. The Docker client allows you to change the amount of memory provided to Docker using a simple slider interface.

How can I set this value via docker's command line utility?

For added clarity, this is not per container memory, this is the value of "Total Memory" that's returned when you run docker info.

Thank you

5

With docker (at least version 18.03.1) the settings for the VM are maintained in a special file located at:

/Users/<username>/Library/Group\ Containers/group.com.docker/settings.json

If you close docker you can edit it directly from the command line using sed, for example the command below will replace the 2 GB limit with a 10GB limit, and create a backup file of the original settings at settings.json.bak

sed -i .bak 's/2048/10240/g' /Users/`id -un`/Library/Group\ Containers/group.com.docker/settings.json

When docker restarts, it will now have 10 GB.

  • wow, i have been searching for this forever. Thanks! – tam5 Feb 24 at 21:14
  • Thanks a bunch. – kian Mar 7 at 21:40
1

On a Mac, Docker actually runs as a Hyperkit virtual machine. The docker command line utility just interfaces with the docker daemon process running inside that virtual machine.

If you run ps auxwww | grep hyperkit on your Mac, you'll see the hyperkit process running with the amount of memory passed as an argument. This is controlled by the Docker Mac client, and I imagine the saved value is stored in a .plist file somewhere.

In order to modify that on the command line, you'd need to find where the Docker Mac client stores the data, modify it, and restart the hyperkit process.

  • Thanks @Scott Rankin for that ps command and the detailed info regarding How Docker utilizes Hyperkit... That being said, it looks like your answer is missing a check mark? ;) – Dzeimsas Zvirblis Jul 14 '17 at 19:55

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