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Call me a newbee/noob, it's my first time with OO, and with trees, and with Ruby. However, I thought I would be able to add a node to a previously created one as is done in the following snippet:

#!/usr/bin ruby
# simple_trial_tree.rb

require 'tree'
root_node = Tree::TreeNode.new("origin", "Push button")
root_node << Tree::TreeNode.new("assets", "assets")
root_node.print_tree

nicely prints this minimal tree:

* origin
+---> assets

But then, if I try to add in the same way a child to the node assets, like so:

require 'tree'
root_node = Tree::TreeNode.new("origin", "Push button")
root_node << Tree::TreeNode.new("assets", "assets")
assets << Tree::TreeNode.new("assets_av", "av")
root_node.print_tree

I get simple_trial_tree.rb:17:in ``<main>': undefined local variable or method ``assets' 'for main:Object (NameError) (with the double back-ticks to be read as single ones). However, the following way does work:

require 'tree'
root_node = Tree::TreeNode.new("origin", "Push button")
assets = Tree::TreeNode.new("assets", "assets")
root_node.add(assets)
assets_av = Tree::TreeNode.new("assets_av", "av")
assets.add(assets_av)
root_node.print_tree

and gives:

* origin
+---+ assets
    +---> assets_av

Now I'm a bit confused as in the manual of Rubytree a whole branch with nodes can be added in 'about' the way I tried it to do (I guess the problem lies in the 'about'). What am I doing wrong here?

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  • where in the manual do you see the usage of a variable before its definition ? – niceman Feb 23 '17 at 10:53
  • That was the confusion. I saw a node inserted before its definition, and I assumed the insertion was also the definition with the first variable as its name defining the node itself. – HarryH Feb 24 '17 at 6:10
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you can't access a variable before it's defined. It's mentioned in the manual as well.

# ..... Create the root node first.  Note that every node has a name and an optional content payload.
root_node = Tree::TreeNode.new("ROOT", "Root Content")
root_node.print_tree

# ..... Now insert the child nodes.  Note that you can "chain" the child insertions for a given path to any depth.
root_node << Tree::TreeNode.new("CHILD1", "Child1 Content") << Tree::TreeNode.new("GRANDCHILD1", "GrandChild1 Content")
root_node << Tree::TreeNode.new("CHILD2", "Child2 Content")

# ..... Lets print the representation to stdout.  This is primarily used for debugging purposes.
root_node.print_tree

# ..... Lets directly access children and grandchildren of the root.  The can be "chained" for a given path to any depth.
child1       = root_node["CHILD1"]
grand_child1 = root_node["CHILD1"]["GRANDCHILD1"]
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  • The order of first inserting non-existing child notes and defining them only after that, was a bit confusing and I still don't understand how they can do that. Thanks. – HarryH Feb 24 '17 at 6:02
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You are doing it wrong. You should do something like this:

require 'tree'
root_node = Tree::TreeNode.new("origin", "Push button")
another_node = Tree::TreeNode.new("assets", "assets")
root_node << another_node
another_node << Tree::TreeNode.new("assets_av", "av")
root_node.print_tree

It happens that "assets" is the title of your second node, not its variable name.

When you used root_node << Tree::TreeNode.new("assets", "assets") you haven't assigned this "assets" node to a variable. Then you just can't mention it in other parts of your code. The title is a property of that node, not a variable name.

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