31

I am using media query for normal desktop screen and idt should not applicable for larger screens. But below media query applied to large desktop screen also. Please correct my media query, For all help thanks in advance.

@media (min-width: 992px) and (max-width : 1200px){//This should work for Normal desktops(15 to 18 inch) only.
}
6
  • What is your definition of "large" here? The size of the screen in inches is not relevant here, it's the resolution in pixels.
    – DavidG
    Feb 23, 2017 at 11:58
  • large means greater than 20 inch desktops.
    – sireesha j
    Feb 23, 2017 at 11:59
  • large --->(1920×900).
    – sireesha j
    Feb 23, 2017 at 12:00
  • The media query you have will not apply above 1200px.
    – DavidG
    Feb 23, 2017 at 12:01
  • Specify what resolutions barriers you want to put here please. Even some 42" TVs only go Full HD width. (1920x1080). So if you're talking about Mac screen resolution then it will only make sense. (2560x1600)
    – CodeMonkey
    Feb 23, 2017 at 12:01

6 Answers 6

60

The challenges of optimizing for large-scale displays center around how to scale and manage content. You need to assume screen width at certain points.


Example: for class "container"

@media screen and (min-width: 1400px) {
  .container {
    width: 1370px;
  }
}
@media screen and (min-width: 1600px) {
  .container {
    width: 1570px;
  }
}
@media screen and (min-width: 1900px) {
  .container {
    width: 1870px;
  }
}
17

Media Queries for Responsive Design

@media screen and (min-width: 600px) {
//For Tablets
    .container {
        width: 100;
    }
}

@media screen and (min-width: 768px) {
//For Laptops
    .container {
        width: 738px;
    }
}

@media screen and (min-width: 992px) {
//For Large Laptops
    .container {
        width: 962px;
    }
}

@media screen and (min-width: 1280px) {
//For Big TV's (HD Screens) 
    .container {
        width: 1250px;
    }
}


@media screen and (min-width: 1920px) {
//For Projectors or Higher Resolution Screens (Full HD)
    .container {
        width: 1890px;
    }
}
@media screen and (min-width: 3840px) {
//For 4K Displays (Ultra HD)
    .container {
        width: 3810px;
    }
}
3
  • What kind of Laptop has a width of less than 768px ? Without meaning to make this sound like a humble brag, even my most antiquated models from the 90s had at least 1024x640. While I recall that in the very first laptop generations had 800x600 (still more than the 768!) and possibly even 640x480, those suit cases were definitely from a period long before CSS. Is width and height possibly mixed up in the examples ?
    – Torque
    Aug 9, 2022 at 9:48
  • 😂😂😂 Very true.
    – igmrrf
    Jan 4 at 19:16
  • There are many android tablets and notebooks available in 768xpx. So its important. Most of the time it is for the tablets. Feb 10 at 23:02
6

Just check what are the screen sizes you need to styled with difference styles. then use media queries as you need. ;)

@media screen and (min-width: 1400px) {}

@media screen and (min-width: 1600px) {}

@media screen and (min-width: 1900px) {}

6
@media screen and (min-width: 1400px) {

}
@media screen and (min-width: 1600px) {

}
@media screen and (min-width: 1900px) {

}
4

You may also try any one of these

@media only screen  and (min-width : 1224px) {
/* Styles */
}


@media only screen  and (min-width : 1824px) {
/* Styles */
}
1
  • 1
    I'm curious why these exact pixel widths? I have not seen these specific parameters before so I would like to know what you have discovered that makes these the best choices? Thanks!
    – ND_Coder
    Apr 18 at 13:30
2

if you want to target larger screen in css then you have to define width criteria for large resolution. I mean if you want to target 4k screen

    @media (min-width: 2000px) {
    }

In media query , screen resolution is considered for screen size.And when you target screen size using css, you must target the screen resolution range.

1

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