2

double TotalMinute=300.0 double TotalMinutesAdded=1378.0


double TotalMinute=300.0
double TotalMinutesAdded=1378.0

foreach(DataRow dr in ds.Tables[0].Rows)
                {

                    //Add The above Timings to each Row's 2nd Column
                    DateTime correctDate=Convert.ToDateTime(dr[2]);

                    correctDate.AddMinutes(TotalMinute);
                    correctDate.AddMinutes(TotalMinutesAdded);

                    dr[2]=correctDate;

                }
1
17

DateTiem Add* functions are not supposed to change current DateTime value. They RETURN the new Value.

If you want your value changed, type like this:

correctDate = correctDate.AddMinutes(TotalMinute);
1
  • Given that correctDate is a DateTime, I'm not sure what the .Value is doing - but your point is clear enough ;-p
    – Marc Gravell
    Jan 8 '09 at 13:27
6

DateTime is immutable; functions like AddMinutes return a new DateTime; so you need to catch the returned value:

DateTime foo = ...
DateTime bar = foo.AddMinutes(5);
1
  • 1
    It would be really nice if the only instance member in DateTime were marked readonly since it is in fact immutable.
    – JaredPar
    Jan 8 '09 at 15:27
5

As mentioned, due to DateTime objects being immutable you have to reassign the variable.

However, a point to note is that you can chain the manipulations as so:

correctDate = correctDate.AddMinutes(TotalMinute)
                         .AddMinutes(TotalMinutesAdded);
1

You have to set the correctDate variable to instance returned from the AddMinutes call:

correctDate = correctDate.AddMinutes(TotalMinute);
1

DateTime is an immutable type, much like String is. You would write date = date.AddDays(1) like you would write str = str.Replace("hello", "").

0

AddMinutes() does not change the value of the original DateTime. It returns a new DateTime with the new value that you have to assign to a variable.

0

The problem lies with

correctDate.AddMinutes(TotalMinute); 
correctDate.AddMinutes(TotalMinutesAdded);

it should be

correctDate = correctDate.AddMinutes(TotalMinute); 
correctDate = correctDate.AddMinutes(TotalMinutesAdded);

The AddMinutes method returns the result, not adding the minutes to correctDate

0

...and to add say 5 minutes to the current time to a datetime variable:

dim dateFive_Minute_Time as datetime

dateFive_Minute_Time = Now.AddMinutes(5)

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