4

What is the problem with this code:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

#include <boost/range/adaptor/transformed.hpp>
#include <boost/range/any_range.hpp>


using namespace boost::adaptors;


using Range =
  boost::any_range<
    int,
    boost::forward_traversal_tag,
    int,
    std::ptrdiff_t>;


void magic(const Range &) {}


int main()
{
  std::vector<int> xs{0, 1, 2};

  auto ys = xs | transformed([](auto x) { return x; });

  const Range zs = ys;
  std::vector<int> us{boost::begin(zs), boost::end(zs)};
  magic(us);

  return 0;
}

Complie:

c++ -g -std=c++14 -O2 main.cpp

Run and get segfault.

But when I compile with lower optimization level, then everything is ok.

gdb output:

Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault.
0x00000000004011a5 in boost::range_detail::any_iterator<int, boost::iterators::forward_traversal_tag, int, long, boost::any_iterator_buffer<64ul> >::dereference (this=<optimized out>) at /usr/include/boost/range/detail/any_iterator.hpp:512
512                     return m_impl->dereference();

Is this boost::any_range bug, or I misuse the library?

Program also crashes if I compile it this way:

c++ -g -std=c++14 -O1 -fisolate-erroneous-paths-dereference main.cpp

The program below crashes too, if I compile it with options -O1 -fisolate-erroneous-paths-dereference:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

#include <boost/range/adaptor/transformed.hpp>
#include <boost/range/any_range.hpp>


using namespace boost::adaptors;


using Range =
  boost::any_range<
    int,
    boost::forward_traversal_tag,
    int &,
    std::ptrdiff_t>;


void magic(const Range &xs) {
  for (auto x: xs) { std::cout << xs; }
}


int main()
{
  std::vector<int> xs{0, 1, 2};
  auto ys = xs | transformed([](auto x) { return x; });
  magic(ys);
  return 0;
}

2 Answers 2

7

This is boost bug 10493, related to 10360, which was introduced in 1.56 (2014-08) and was only finally fixed in 1.74 (2020-08) via fix PR #94

Until 1.74, the problem is that instead of just using your reference type, it wraps it in mutable_reference_type_generator, which prevents you from being able to return a temporary. That is, when you write:

using Range =
  boost::any_range<
    int,
    boost::forward_traversal_tag,
    int,
    std::ptrdiff_t>;

You're explicitly specifying your reference type to be int, not int&, because your range is basically an input range. But the boost internals are changing it to int& anyway, so you dangle. When you write const int intsead of int, the type trait doesn't add the reference, so you actually do end up with const int.

2

Actually when I was typing the title for my question, this question was offered as possible answer.

As suggested in the answer for the question, I replaced int with const int and it worked:

using Range =
  boost::any_range<
    int,
    boost::forward_traversal_tag,
    const int,
    std::ptrdiff_t>;

I decided to publish the question because the quoted question is not marked as answered.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.