6

How can I calculate the height of a row (in pixels) in a table with JavaScript?

<table>
  <tr>
    <td>Cell 1</td>
    <td>Cell 2</td>
  </tr>
</table>
  • Note: This isn't as simple as clientHeight, offsetHeight, or scrollHeight. Border spacing on the table comes into play. jsfiddle.net/xbtp1je8 – Brad Sep 12 at 22:44
  • 1
    @Brad why you want to inclide border-spacing? technically it doesn't count into the height of the tr. It's an empty space between two tr – Temani Afif Sep 18 at 14:07
  • 1
    @TemaniAfif My goal is to determine the effective height of the row for use in a virtual grid with thousands of rows, lots of cells. It isn't fast to put in thousands of rows in the DOM all at once. Therefore, I'm using a technique where only the rows visible in the scroll pane (and a few around them) are shown. This requires knowing the exact pixel height of the rows, including the border-spacing. Otherwise, the scrolling will be off a bit. – Brad Sep 18 at 14:55
  • 1
    @TemaniAfif I've tried that, which works for the most part, but seems to break a bit when zooming in/out. 2px becomes 1.75px somehow. (And, that's with no explicit border-spacing rule set... just the default style sheet.) – Brad Sep 18 at 15:10
  • 1
    @Brad - I think the zooming issue is related to using offsetHeight as the base measurement since it returns a rounded number. You can use getBoundingClientRect().height to return a fractional height and avoid the zooming issue (I think). – benvc Sep 18 at 15:22
13
function findHeights() {
            var tbl = document.getElementById('your table').rows;
            alert(tbl[0].offsetHeight); // row 1
}
  • 2
    You need to know the 'border-spacing' as well. – G. Allen Morris III Aug 14 '14 at 17:44
7
document.getElementById('your_row_id').offsetHeight;
  • whether offsetheight also applies to determine the row height of a paragraph? – user495688 Nov 22 '10 at 9:05
5

I've done a few calculations.

  1. Get the total height value
  2. Get the padding-top value
  3. Get the padding-bottom value
  4. Get the margin-top value
  5. Get the margin-bottom value
  6. Get the border-space value

Now with all these information, we can take the total heigt and minus off the paddings, margins and border-space.

I've commented in the code on what each line does.

var elmnt = document.getElementsByTagName("td")[0];
var totalHeight = elmnt.offsetHeight; // gets the total height value inclusive of all paddings & margins

// The following is to get the padding-top, padding-bottom, margin-top, margin-bottom values
var paddedHeightTop = window.getComputedStyle(elmnt, null).getPropertyValue('padding-top');
var paddedHeightBottom = window.getComputedStyle(elmnt, null).getPropertyValue('padding-bottom');
var marginHeightTop = window.getComputedStyle(elmnt, null).getPropertyValue('margin-top');
var marginHeightBottom = window.getComputedStyle(elmnt, null).getPropertyValue('margin-bottom');
var borderHeight = window.getComputedStyle(elmnt, null).getPropertyValue('-webkit-border-vertical-spacing');


// To remove the px from the string so we can use it as an integer to subtract from total value.
var newPaddedHeightTop = paddedHeightTop.substring(0, paddedHeightTop.length - 2); // remove the px
var newPaddedHeightBottom = paddedHeightBottom.substring(0, paddedHeightBottom.length - 2); // remove the px
var newMarginHeightTop = marginHeightTop.substring(0, marginHeightTop.length - 2); // remove the px
var newMarginHeightBottom = marginHeightBottom.substring(0, marginHeightBottom.length - 2); // remove the px
var newBorderHeight = borderHeight.substring(0, marginHeightBottom.length - 2); // remove the px

// Take the total and minus of all these paddings, margins and border-space
var finalHeight = totalHeight - newPaddedHeightTop - newPaddedHeightBottom - newMarginHeightTop - newMarginHeightBottom - newBorderHeight;

alert(totalHeight + " (total height) - " + newPaddedHeightTop + " (padding-top) - " + newPaddedHeightBottom +  " (padding-bottom) - " + newMarginHeightTop + " (margin-top) - " + newMarginHeightBottom + " (margin-bottom) - " + newBorderHeight + " (border-space) = "  + finalHeight);
td {
  height: 50px;
  padding: 2px;
  border-spacing: 2px 3px;
}
<table>
  <tr>
    <td>Cell 1</td>
    <td>Cell 2</td>
  </tr>
</table>

<pre></pre>

I've added that css just for you to see that it does minus of all the padding values and gives the exact height of the td.

Update 1: Added calculations for border-space.

var borderHeight = window.getComputedStyle(elmnt, null).getPropertyValue('-webkit-border-vertical-spacing');

Also, as explained in the comment, window.getComputedStyle(elmnt, null).getPropertyValue('-webkit-border-vertical-spacing') gets values in pixels, so even if it is set in percentages, it will retrieve what is its pixel value.

So from this, we can pretty much just get the total value of height and then minus off all the paddings, margins and border-space.

  • 1
    Learned something new, could you explain getComputedStyle(elemnt, null) a little, (what is null doing) – Ankit Sep 17 at 15:18
  • 2
    @Ankit The null is actually a pseudoElement. In this case we have none, so I've set is as null. I studied this at w3schools.com/jsref/jsref_getcomputedstyle.asp . You can use this as a reference. Its an optional option. – Gosi Sep 17 at 17:45
  • This doesn't actually answer the question, as it doesn't factor in border spacing. It's also dangerous to make an assumption that the measurements are always going to be in pixels. – Brad Sep 17 at 18:36
  • 1
    @Brad window.getComputedStyle(elmnt, null).getPropertyValue('padding-top'); var paddedHe will always return the value in pixels. Even if the padding is in % it will get the pixel value of it. Try changing the css padding value to 5% and you can see it. – Gosi Sep 18 at 5:24
  • 1
    @Gosi Interesting, did not know that! Thanks for the information. – Brad Sep 18 at 14:55
4

var tableHeight =  document.getElementById("tableId").offsetHeight;
var totalRowInTable =  document.getElementById("tableId").rows.length;

//So here we have total height of table and total <tr> tags, so tableHeight / total <tr> tag will gave each <tr> tag height.
var trTagHeight = tableHeight/totalRowInTable;
console.log(trTagHeight);

//Note: This is approx value of each row, excluding padding and cell padding value.
<table id="tableId">
  <tr>
    <td>Cell 1</td>
    <td>Cell 2</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>Cell 1</td>
    <td>Cell 2</td>
  </tr>
</table>

  • 3
    This is probably the closest answer so far. The only thing is that it won't guarantee any particular row... just the average height of all of them. This may not matter if all of the rows are the same height. – Brad Sep 17 at 18:38
3
+50

If you want to get an accurate table row height, then you should use Element.getBoundingClientRect() rather than Element.offsetHeight in order to get fractional height rather than a rounded figure.

document.querySelector('tr').getBoundingClientRect().height;

If you also want to include border-spacing in your calculation of table row height, you need to decide how you want to allocate it to each row (since it is really space between rows and not part of any particular row). Also, be sure to check whether or not the table's border-collapse property is set to collapse (if so, then border-spacing is not included in your table).

In the snippet below, the first / last rows are allocated the space above / below that is not shared with another row, all space between rows is shared evenly. This ensures that the sum of all row heights is equal to the table height.

Alternatively, you could choose not to allocate the space above the first row or below the last row to any row, since this space is not included in the height calculation for <thead> or <tbody> elements so that space could be allocated to those elements rather than the rows themselves.

const getRowHeight = (tr) => {
  let height = tr.getBoundingClientRect().height;
  let table = tr.closest('table');
  let style = window.getComputedStyle(table);
  let collapse = style.getPropertyValue('border-collapse');
  let space = parseFloat(
    style.getPropertyValue('border-spacing').split(' ')[1].replace(/[^\d.]/g, '')
  );
  
  if (collapse === 'separate') {
    if (table.rows.length === 1) {
      height += space * 2;
    } else if (tr.rowIndex === 0 || tr.rowIndex === table.rows.length - 1) {
      height += space + space / 2;
    } else {
      height += space;
    }
    
  }
  
  return height;
}

// comments below are examples only (will change based on defaults, zoom, etc)

console.log(getRowHeight(document.querySelector('#single')));
// 24 (20px row height + 2px space above + 2px space below)

console.log(getRowHeight(document.querySelector('#top')));
// 23 (20px row height + 2px space above + 1px space below)

console.log(getRowHeight(document.querySelector('#middle')));
// 22 (20px row height + 1px space above + 1px space below)

console.log(getRowHeight(document.querySelector('#bottom')));
// 23 (20px row height + 1px space above + 2px space below)
<table>
  <tr id="single">
    <td>Cell</td>
  </tr>
</table>

<table>
  <tr id="top">
    <td>Cell</td>
  </tr>
  <tr id="middle">
    <td>Cell</td>
  </tr>
  <tr id="bottom">
    <td>Cell</td>
  </tr>
</table>

0

var table_elements = document.querySelector("table>tbody");
var i;
for (i = 1; i <= table_elements.rows.length; i++) {
  var row_selector = "table>tbody>tr:nth-child(" + [i] + ")";
  var table_row = document.querySelector(row_selector);
  var vertical_spacing = window.getComputedStyle(table_row).getPropertyValue("-webkit-border-vertical-spacing");
  var margin_top = window.getComputedStyle(table_row).getPropertyValue("margin-top");
  var margin_bottom = window.getComputedStyle(table_row).getPropertyValue("margin-bottom");
  var row_height= parseInt(vertical_spacing, 10)+parseInt(margin_top, 10)+parseInt(margin_bottom, 10)+table_row.offsetHeight

  console.log("The height is: "+row_height+"px");
}
<table>
  <tr>
    <td>Cell 1</td>
    <td>Cell 2</td>
  </tr>
</table>

You can probably find a better way to loop through the <tr> element.

 

Simple code explanation:

Gets all the table rows from tbody and loops through all of them using nth-child.

It then sets the row (var row_selector) and obtains its vertical spacing, margin (top and bottom) and the offsetHeight (element height, padding, etc.).

Since offsetHeight only gets the padding, border and scrollbar, but not the margin, we need to get the computed style value like we did with vertical border spacing.

Finally it parses the vertical border spacing and the margin values to an Int and adds it to offsetHeight and logs the final value to the console.

-2

Sorry Was messed up there a sec

<table>
<tr onclick="alert(this.offsetHeight)>
<td >
Hey
<br />
You
</td>
</tr
</table>

If you need to get it, you can give the tr an ID and use getElementById().offsetHeight

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