-2

I want to print the shape of numbers using 2D arrays. What I am saying is just like this. Think I want print num 2.

111111
    11
111111
11
111111

I already tried, starting like this, but I cant build it further.

#include <stdio.h>
int main(){

int Num[5][6]=  {{111111},
                {000011},
                {111111},
                {110000},
                {111111}};
 int i,j;
 for(i=0;i<6;i++){
     for(j=0;j<7;j++){
          printf("%d",Num[i][j]); 
     }
 }
 return 0;
}

Instead of spaces i have included "0" in my code.

15
  • 1
    java or c ....? – YCF_L Feb 24 '17 at 11:04
  • 2
    That is not even an half-hearted attempt, sorry. – Sourav Ghosh Feb 24 '17 at 11:05
  • 1
    Welcome to Stack Overflow! Please show your research/debugging effort so far. Please read How to Ask page first. – Sourav Ghosh Feb 24 '17 at 11:05
  • 1
    @roch.p: Yeah, because if it was Java it wouldn't compile. :) – Henrik Aasted Sørensen Feb 24 '17 at 11:06
  • 1
    int var=000011; is nothing more than a number in base 8 (i.e int var=011). Use char array better. – Meninx - メネンックス Feb 24 '17 at 11:09
0

You probably want this:

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {

  int Num[5][6] =
  {
    { 1,1,1,1,1,1 },
    { 0,0,0,0,1,1 },
    { 1,1,1,1,1,1 },
    { 1,1,1,1,0,0 },
    { 1,1,1,1,1,1 } 
  };

  int i, j;
  for (i = 0; i<5; i++) {
    for (j = 0; j<6; j++) {
      if (Num[i][j] == 1)
        printf("1");
      else
        printf(" ");
    }

    printf("\n");
  }
  return 0;
}

Disclaimer: there is still room for improvement. The proposed solution is as close as possible to the original code.

5
  • What is wrong with my code? Without using that headers can't i print that. I'm new for coding.. :) – RochaaP Feb 24 '17 at 11:28
  • @roch.p You need the stdio.h header, read your C text book. What's wrong with your code: just compare yours to mine, it's very similar. – Jabberwocky Feb 24 '17 at 11:34
  • @roch.p Actually I'm not quite sure what you meant my "that headers" in your comment. Please elaborate. – Jabberwocky Feb 24 '17 at 11:35
  • I meant headers for #include <stdio.h>, #include <stdlib.h>, #include <string.h> that you have created before. It's appreciate for the time you have given for me. :) – RochaaP Feb 24 '17 at 11:45
  • @roch.p only #include <stdio.h> is required. – Jabberwocky Feb 24 '17 at 12:28

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