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So I am currently new to python but I know a few basic ideas and I decided to start off with a little project of my own. I want to create a text to binary converter but in my own version. For example I want to give each letter the value that it holds due to its placement such as a = 1 b = 2 or a = 1 b = 10 and so on. Kind of like my own secret code or encoding. How is it possible for me to set my own specific binary value to each letter and then use a user input to convert his or her word into my binary code? Do I have to make every single letter a variable? and how can I apply the specific binary values to the user input? I do not need the bin() function since "my" binary and normal binary values are different. As I said above I am basing mine on the placement of letters. Sorry for my newbieness in advance!

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  • "Botched" means "badly done". I'm guessing that's not what you really mean?
    – Chris
    Feb 24, 2017 at 18:21
  • Could you give an example input and output? Feb 24, 2017 at 18:23
  • Hi thanks for replying. By saying botched i meant badly done since as i explained this converter is not a literal converter but one based on letter placement so its a "badly" done converter. As for the example i would like a input using input("What is your name?"). So for example i input "Bob". Since "b" is second in the alphabet it gets a value of 0010 then "o" is 15th in the alphabet it would get a value of 1111.
    – SubToxic
    Feb 24, 2017 at 19:48
  • Hint: bin(ord('o')-ord('a')+1)
    – AShelly
    Feb 24, 2017 at 21:35
  • @AShelly could you please describe that command more in depth?
    – SubToxic
    Feb 25, 2017 at 17:03

3 Answers 3

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To convert string to binary install the library - pip install endecrypt PyPI - https://pypi.org/project/endecrypt/ then

import endecrypt

endecrypt.encode("Hello World 123", 'binary')
endecrypt.decode("1001000 1100101 1101100 1101100 1101111 100000 1010111 1101111 1110010 1101100 1100100", 'binary')
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If anyone is still asking this question:

 def binary_converter(string):
    for character in string:
        print(bin(ord(character))[2:].zfill(8))

 binary_converter("Hello World!")

Basically this function takes a string and turns it into the number with ord and then almost binary with bin but for some reason you need this:"[2:].zfill(8)" and I'm still not sure what the reason for that is. It outputs this:

01001000
01100101
01101100
01101100
01101111
00100000
01010111
01101111
01110010
01101100
01100100
00100001

so without this "[2:].zfill(8)" you get this:

0b1001000
0b1100101
0b1101100
0b1101100
0b1101111
0b100000
0b1010111
0b1101111
0b1110010
0b1101100
0b1100100
0b100001
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You could create a for loop and manually set each variable or you could use the built in bin or ord function to save time. Using bin(ord('letter')) first converts the letter in a number which can then be converted using the bin function. I'm also a newb and i've had to do something similar to this in 7th grade.

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