Basically I would like to have some container, that resembles something like std::unordered_map<std::string, std::variant<unsigned, /*self_type*/>>. In this container, the unsigned value is a terminal node, while the self_type represents a subtree, that shall be searched further until terminal node.

This could, however, be implemented with one extra wrapper class.

struct node {
    std::unordered_map<std::string, 
                       std::variant<unsigned, std::unique_ptr<node>>> children;
};

Fair enough, but I'd want to initialize it as a normal std::unordered_map with nested intializer list. For example:

{
    {
        "str1",
        {
            {"strstr1", 1},
            {"strstr2", 2}
        }
    },
    {"str2", 3}
}

Suggestions for a more appropriate data structure are also welcome.

  • Are you sure you need a tree of trees? You could for example use a single tree for all the data, with some extra info added to each node to indicate if it is a "partition" between two "separate" trees. – John Zwinck Feb 25 '17 at 2:00
  • @JohnZwinck I don't really need tree of trees. Tree of trees is natural in pure tree structures, right? If I'd use a pure node-based tree structure then it will be easier to do. I chose unordered_map mainly for performance issue, to flatten the tree. Yet you suggestions had remind me that even doing this may not actually yield better performance. – YiFei Feb 25 '17 at 2:10
  • How about extra {}s? – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Feb 25 '17 at 2:41
  • @Yakk Okay, where to add? – YiFei Feb 25 '17 at 2:51
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Solution 1 - using wrapper class:

struct node {
    using myvar = boost::variant< unsigned, boost::recursive_wrapper< node > >;
    using childmap = std::unordered_map< std::string, myvar >;

    node() {}

    node( std::initializer_list< childmap::value_type > il ) :
        children( il ) {}

    childmap children;
};

I'm using boost::variant here since I don't have std::variant available. The boost::recursive_wrapper is required because boost::variant normally requires a complete type, but at this point node is still incomplete.

boost::recursive_wrapper is nothing magic. It's just a wrapper around a pointer! As we know, a pointer can be declared for an incomplete type without issues. This wrapper class just hides the fact that a pointer is used by taking care of allocation, deallocation and providing value semantics. It has special support by boost::variant that makes the wrapper completely transparent, so the variant can be used as if there is no wrapper class at all.

Usage:

node n {
    { "foo", 1 },
    { "bar", 2 },
    { "baz", node {
        { "bim", 3 },
        { "bam", 4 }}
    }
};

n.children[ "fum" ] = 5;
n.children[ "fup" ] = node{{ "fap", 6 }};

The explicit "node" in the initializer list is required because the variant contructor can't deduce the type from the nested initializer list.

Demo: http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/123c59a3523c39ed

Solution 2 - deriving from unordered_map:

This removes the need for the "children" member.

struct nodemap :
    std::unordered_map< 
        std::string, 
        boost::variant< unsigned, boost::recursive_wrapper< nodemap > > >
{
    using base = std::unordered_map< 
        std::string, 
        boost::variant< unsigned, boost::recursive_wrapper< nodemap > > >;

    // Forward all constructors of the base class.
    using base::base;
};

Usage:

nodemap n{
    { "foo", 1 },
    { "bar", 2 },
    { "baz", nodemap{
        { "bim", 3 },
        { "bam", 4 }}
    }};

n[ "fum" ] = 5;
n[ "fup" ] = nodemap{{ "fap", 6 }};

More usage examples:

// Add something to a child nodemap. 
boost::get<nodemap>( n[ "baz" ] )[ "fap" ] = 7;

// This will throw a boost::bad_get exception because n[ "foo" ] is not a nodemap.
//boost::get<nodemap>( n[ "foo" ] )[ "fap" ] = 8;

// To avoid this problem, we can check if the child actually is a nodemap:
if( nodemap* pn = boost::get<nodemap>( &n[ "foo" ] ) )
{
    (*pn)[ "fap" ] = 8; 
}

Demo: http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/69914ec5646129f2

  • Why is a map not requiring a complete type?... That implies, if unordered_map is used, the painful node::create must be explicitly used? – YiFei Feb 25 '17 at 4:48
  • As written at stackoverflow.com/a/8487164/7571258 std::map seems to use a different storage model where it doesn't have to copy elements. You could replace the node::create calls with new node if you delete the node elements of children in the destructor. To prevent duplicate deletion of copied node you should then either provide custom copy constructor and assignment operator or mark these as "= delete" so they can't be used. – zett42 Feb 25 '17 at 5:10
  • This still bothered me for hours... until I finally found the solution for unordered_map. Conclusion: C++ is awesome but boost makes it amazing! :D – zett42 Feb 25 '17 at 16:26
  • Turns out we don't even need a wrapper class if we derive from unordered_map. So no need for the children member anymore. Updated my answer... – zett42 Feb 25 '17 at 16:51
  • Wow, thanks a ton. – YiFei Feb 26 '17 at 1:52

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