2

When a user submits without any boxes checked. I need my ODM (Mongoid) to update the record appropriately.

Having a bit of trouble with:

  <% Notification.all.each do |notification| %>
    <li>
      <%= check_box_tag 'user[notification_ids][]', notification.id, @user.notifications.include?(notification) %>
      <%= label_tag notification.description %>
    </li>
  <% end %>

The doc suggests that the check_box helper puts in a hidden input. The hidden field has the same name and its attributes mimic an unchecked check box. However, with the above code. I am going through a loop. Which is slightly different.

I tried:

<%= check_box('user_notification_ids_', '', options = {:index => notification.id, :checked => @user.notifications.include?(notification)}, checked_value = "1", unchecked_value = "0") %>

But whenever I submit, I get: illegal ObjectId format

Or should I create the hidden tag for notification_ids manually? Something like:

<%= hidden_field_tag 'user[notification_ids][]', '[]' %>

Looking to hear your feedback

1

Go with the first loop you included. It looks much simpler and looks like it does the same thing.

If I understand your first sentence correctly, it sounds like you aren't seeing the user's notifications getting updated to none when they uncheck all the check boxes. When there are no check boxes checked, the browser won't send that param back. It simply won't be included in params so when you do something like:

@user.update_attributes(params[:user])

... notifications won't get updated. In your controller, do this to ensure there is something set for params[:user][:notifications]:

params[:user][:notifications] ||= []

This is will set it to an empty array if there if it doesn't exists and/or there's no value there. This ensures that update_attributes will set it to none/empty.

  • Yea thats how I currently have it set up. The problem is when the user doesnt select any boxes. Nothing is submitted with the form. In my controller, I could have something like: params[:user] = {:notification_ids => []} if params[:user].blank? However, its a bit more complicated than this. Since I've got two sets of notifications in two different pages (Page A and Page B). – Christian Fazzini Nov 22 '10 at 18:54
  • This means, if user has notifications checked on the first page. On the second page if user doesn't select any check boxes and form is submitted, then it will set it to none/empty for ALL notifications. Not just for the notifications on the page B (second page), but also for the notifications on the first page. – Christian Fazzini Nov 22 '10 at 18:55
  • If you have half the checkboxes on one page and half on the other and they are using the same param name, then you have a problem (as you mention). You'll have to use two different param names so that one page doesn't erase the other page's checkbox selections. Something like params[:user][:page1_check] and params[:user][:page2_check] and then manually map those to attributes of the user model. Your task will be simple if you put it all on one page. – Georges Nov 26 '10 at 20:29
1

check_box_tag doesn't generate any hidden field. check_box does, but looking at your situation, I think using check_box_tag is more appropriate since the check_box method is mainly used for boolean field. Here is one way to do it.

<%= hidden_field_tag 'user[notification_ids][]' %>
<% Notification.all.each do |notification| %>
  <li>
    <%= check_box_tag 'user[notification_ids][]', notification.id, @user.notifications.include?(notification) %>
    <%= label_tag notification.description %>
  </li>
<% end %>

When the form is submitted with the checkboxes for Notification of id 2 and 3 checked, the value for params[:user] is { "notification_ids" => ["", "2", "3"] }. When nothing is checked, params[:user] is {"notification_ids"=>[""]}, which will clear the user's notifications. This works because empty string is ignored by ActiveRecord. From here, we can use the usual @user.update_attributes(params[:user]) to update the User model.

  • My comment(s) for Georges applies here as well. Kindly look above :-) – Christian Fazzini Nov 22 '10 at 18:58
  • @ChristianFazzini, I have updated my answer to take care of that. A hidden_field_tag is added on top to allow the notifications to be cleared. – htanata Nov 23 '10 at 5:10
  • Hi Htanata, I tried as you suggested with <%= hidden_field_tag 'user[notification_ids][]' %>. I get the following error: "illegal ObjectId format". I believe its because the form submits it as "user"=>{"notification_ids"=>[""]} instead of "user"=>{"notification_ids"=>[]}. Is there a way to make it submit without the double quotes in [], as such: "user"=>{"notification_ids"=>[]}? – Christian Fazzini Nov 23 '10 at 7:20
  • For example, with <%= hidden_field_tag 'user[notification_ids][]' %>.If user selects one check box. In controller, def update, I have: puts params[:user][:notification_ids].count returns 2. If user does NOT select any check boxes, params[:user][:notification_ids].count returns 1. params[:user][:notification_ids].blank? also returns false – Christian Fazzini Nov 23 '10 at 7:33
  • @ChristianFazzini: As shown in my answer, the empty string is ignored by ActiveRecord, so it's not the problem. I've tested the code and there's no error. Looking at your error message, it's probably a problem with Mongoid. In that case, you'll have to strip the empty string before doing update_attributes. For example: params[:user][:notification_ids] = (params[:user][:notification_ids] || []).reject(&:blank?). If you're using this solution, I think you can safely remove the hidden field in the form. – htanata Nov 23 '10 at 8:57

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