155

Problem

I want to return a file in my ASP.Net Web API Controller, but all my approaches return the HttpResponseMessage as JSON.

Code so far

public async Task<HttpResponseMessage> DownloadAsync(string id)
{
    var response = new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.OK);
    response.Content = new StreamContent({{__insert_stream_here__}});
    response.Content.Headers.ContentType = new MediaTypeHeaderValue("application/octet-stream");
    return response;
}

When I call this endpoint in my browser, the Web API returns the HttpResponseMessage as JSON with the HTTP Content Header set to application/json.

0
267

If this is ASP.net-Core then you are mixing web API versions. Have the action return a derived IActionResult because in your current code the framework is treating HttpResponseMessage as a model.

[Route("api/[controller]")]
public class DownloadController : Controller {
    //GET api/download/12345abc
    [HttpGet("{id}")]
    public async Task<IActionResult> Download(string id) {
        Stream stream = await {{__get_stream_based_on_id_here__}}

        if(stream == null)
            return NotFound(); // returns a NotFoundResult with Status404NotFound response.

        return File(stream, "application/octet-stream"); // returns a FileStreamResult
    }    
}
15
  • 19
    In my case I needed to render an Excel in memory and return it for download, so I needed to define a file name with extension as well: return File(stream, "application/octet-stream", "filename.xlsx"); This way when it downloads the user can open it directly. – KMJungersen Jan 21 '19 at 22:32
  • 2
    @ΩmegaMan it is a helper method on ControllerBase and is part of the framework itself docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/api/… – Nkosi Mar 30 '19 at 18:18
  • 4
    Ok, found my issue, though my controller was working in .NET Core 2.2, it was not derived from the base class Controller an thus didn't have access to the ControllerBase.NotFound() method. Once derived, it all worked. lol / thx – ΩmegaMan Mar 30 '19 at 18:57
  • 4
    @RobL not in this case. the framework will dispose of the stream when the response is completed. If you use a using statement the stream will be disposed before the response has been sent. – Nkosi Nov 16 '20 at 16:40
  • 2
    Thank you @Nkosi, your comment saved my sanity! I was getting a 500 server error when returning a File(...). I had the memoryStream incorrectly wrapped in a using statement. – Kevin Brydon Jan 14 at 13:55
29

You can return FileResult with this methods:

1: Return FileStreamResult

    [HttpGet("get-file-stream/{id}"]
    public async Task<FileStreamResult> DownloadAsync(string id)
    {
        var fileName="myfileName.txt";
        var mimeType="application/...."; 
        var stream = await GetFileStreamById(id);

        return new FileStreamResult(stream, mimeType)
        {
            FileDownloadName = fileName
        };
    }

2: Return FileContentResult

    [HttpGet("get-file-content/{id}"]
    public async Task<FileContentResult> DownloadAsync(string id)
    {
        var fileName="myfileName.txt";
        var mimeType="application/...."; 
        var fileBytes = await GetFileBytesById(id);

        return new FileContentResult(fileBytes, mimeType)
        {
            FileDownloadName = fileName
        };
    }
3
  • 2
    If within a ControllerBase there are many overloaded versions of ControllerBase.File helper that returns any one of those. – Nkosi Oct 26 '19 at 22:44
  • 2
    Your answer is still valid. So do not feel disheartened. I was just pointing out some resources you can use to support your answer. – Nkosi Oct 26 '19 at 22:46
  • 1
    Yes this is true. – H. Naeemaei Feb 21 '20 at 13:13
19

Here is a simplistic example of streaming a file:

using System.IO;
using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc;
[HttpGet("{id}")]
public async Task<FileStreamResult> Download(int id)
{
    var path = "<Get the file path using the ID>";
    var stream = File.OpenRead(path);
    return new FileStreamResult(stream, "application/octet-stream");
}

Note:

Be sure to use FileStreamResult from Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc and not from System.Web.Mvc.

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