-2
if "link?" or "Link?" in comment.body and comment.id not in comments_replied_to and comment.author != r.user.me():
        print ("Link String found " + comment.id)
        print(comment.body)
        #comment.reply("Here you go!")
        print ("Replied to comment ")
        #time.sleep(600)

When I run the code it skips through the first "link", or rather it runs the code inside the if statement whether or not "link?" is found in comment.body. I'm trying to run the code as:

if (a or b) and c and d

Where it's searching for either the string "link?" or the string "Link?" in the comment body. If either one is found, it will run the code in the for loop. It currently works if I have:

if "link?" in comment.body and comment.id not in comments_replied_to and comment.author != r.user.me():

So I know that it's the "or" operator that is wrong. It's just that I'm used to coding with Java where operators can be held in brackets.

2
  • 3
    Not this again. It is ("link?" in comment.body or "Link?" in comment.body) and .... So also an in check in the first test and with brackets. Commented Feb 25, 2017 at 21:50
  • 1
    What you've put here wouldn't work in Java either. Java's syntax is more strict.
    – khelwood
    Commented Feb 25, 2017 at 21:52

1 Answer 1

2

The following:

if "link?" or "Link?" in comment.body and comment.id not in comments_replied_to and comment.author != r.user.me()

Becomes something like this:

bool("link") OR ("Link?" in comment.body) AND (comment.id not in...), etc.

That first "link" value is always going to be True because only empty strings are False-y.


Let's Get Disassembled!

This question seems to come up frequently, and I think it's a good opportunity to check out Python's disassembler!

In [1]: import dis
In [3]: def func(comment):
   ...:     if "link?" or "Link?" in comment.body and comment.id not in comments_replied_to and comment.autho
   ...: r != r.user.me():
   ...:         print ("Link String found " + comment.id)
   ...:         print(comment.body)
   ...:         #comment.reply("Here you go!")
   ...:         print ("Replied to comment ")
   ...:     

In [4]: dis.dis(func)
  2           0 LOAD_CONST               1 ('link?')
              3 POP_JUMP_IF_TRUE        60
              6 LOAD_CONST               2 ('Link?')
              9 LOAD_FAST                0 (comment)
             12 LOAD_ATTR                0 (body)
             15 COMPARE_OP               6 (in)
             18 POP_JUMP_IF_FALSE      100
             21 LOAD_FAST                0 (comment)
             24 LOAD_ATTR                1 (id)
             27 LOAD_GLOBAL              2 (comments_replied_to)
             30 COMPARE_OP               7 (not in)
             33 POP_JUMP_IF_FALSE      100
             36 LOAD_FAST                0 (comment)
             39 LOAD_ATTR                3 (author)
             42 LOAD_GLOBAL              4 (r)
             45 LOAD_ATTR                5 (user)
             48 LOAD_ATTR                6 (me)
             51 CALL_FUNCTION            0 (0 positional, 0 keyword pair)
             54 COMPARE_OP               3 (!=)
             57 POP_JUMP_IF_FALSE      100

See how it says "LOAD CONST" and then after that "POP JUMP IF TRUE". That means that nothing else gets evaluated on that line because that CONST is always going to be true.

By comparison, down below, you get this:

              6 LOAD_CONST               2 ('Link?')
              9 LOAD_FAST                0 (comment)
             12 LOAD_ATTR                0 (body)
             15 COMPARE_OP               6 (in)
             18 POP_JUMP_IF_FALSE      100

That's what a real comparison looks like: it's using the binary operator in to compare the CONST with the loaded ATTR. Question for those paying attention: why is this one POP_JUMP_IF_FALSE and not POP_JUMP_IF_TRUE like the first one?

You can try this at home! Load up dis and start disassembling!

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