45

Given a 2D(M x N) matrix, and a 2D Kernel(K x L), how do i return a matrix that is the result of max or mean pooling using the given kernel over the image?

I'd like to use numpy if possible.

Note: M, N, K, L can be both even or odd and they need not be perfectly divisible by each other, eg: 7x5 matrix and 2x2 kernel.

eg of max pooling:

matrix:
array([[  20,  200,   -5,   23],
       [ -13,  134,  119,  100],
       [ 120,   32,   49,   25],
       [-120,   12,   09,   23]])
kernel: 2 x 2
soln:
array([[  200,  119],
       [  120,   49]])
84

You could use scikit-image block_reduce:

import numpy as np
import skimage.measure

a = np.array([
      [  20,  200,   -5,   23],
      [ -13,  134,  119,  100],
      [ 120,   32,   49,   25],
      [-120,   12,    9,   23]
])
skimage.measure.block_reduce(a, (2,2), np.max)

Gives:

array([[200, 119],
       [120,  49]])
1
  • 4
    This is a great answer IFF you you only need to stride by your reduction size. This API doesnt allow (yet) the ability to modify your stride (sadly). Upvoted :-) – trumpetlicks Aug 24 '20 at 15:32
27

If the image size is evenly divisible by the kernal size, you can reshape the array and use max or mean as you see fit

import numpy as np

mat = np.array([[  20,  200,   -5,   23],
       [ -13,  134,  119,  100],
       [ 120,   32,   49,   25],
       [-120,   12,   9,   23]])

M, N = mat.shape
K = 2
L = 2

MK = M // K
NL = N // L
print(mat[:MK*K, :NL*L].reshape(MK, K, NL, L).max(axis=(1, 3)))
# [[200, 119], [120, 49]] 

If you don't have an even number of kernels, you'll have to handle the boundaries separately. (As pointed out in the comments, this results in the matrix being copied, which will affect performance).

mat = np.array([[20,  200,   -5,   23, 7],
                [-13,  134,  119,  100, 8],
                [120,   32,   49,   25, 12],
                [-120,   12,   9,   23, 15],
                [-57,   84,   19,   17, 82],
                ])
# soln
# [200, 119, 8]
# [120, 49, 15]
# [84, 19, 82]
M, N = mat.shape
K = 2
L = 2

MK = M // K
NL = N // L

# split the matrix into 'quadrants'
Q1 = mat[:MK * K, :NL * L].reshape(MK, K, NL, L).max(axis=(1, 3))
Q2 = mat[MK * K:, :NL * L].reshape(-1, NL, L).max(axis=2)
Q3 = mat[:MK * K, NL * L:].reshape(MK, K, -1).max(axis=1)
Q4 = mat[MK * K:, NL * L:].max()

# compose the individual quadrants into one new matrix
soln = np.vstack([np.c_[Q1, Q3], np.c_[Q2, Q4]])
print(soln)
# [[200 119   8]
#  [120  49  15]
#  [ 84  19  82]]
1
  • 1
    M, N = mat.shape would be clearer here. Also you should point out that your answer works even if the kernel doesn't divide the source, but discards the boundaries(and incurs a copy). – Eric Feb 26 '17 at 1:07
18

Instead of making "quadrants" as shown by Elliot's answer, we could pad it to make it evenly divisible, then perform either max or mean pooling.

As pooling is often used in CNN, the input array is usually 3D. So I made a function that works on either 2D or 3D arrays.

def pooling(mat,ksize,method='max',pad=False):
    '''Non-overlapping pooling on 2D or 3D data.

    <mat>: ndarray, input array to pool.
    <ksize>: tuple of 2, kernel size in (ky, kx).
    <method>: str, 'max for max-pooling, 
                   'mean' for mean-pooling.
    <pad>: bool, pad <mat> or not. If no pad, output has size
           n//f, n being <mat> size, f being kernel size.
           if pad, output has size ceil(n/f).

    Return <result>: pooled matrix.
    '''

    m, n = mat.shape[:2]
    ky,kx=ksize

    _ceil=lambda x,y: int(numpy.ceil(x/float(y)))

    if pad:
        ny=_ceil(m,ky)
        nx=_ceil(n,kx)
        size=(ny*ky, nx*kx)+mat.shape[2:]
        mat_pad=numpy.full(size,numpy.nan)
        mat_pad[:m,:n,...]=mat
    else:
        ny=m//ky
        nx=n//kx
        mat_pad=mat[:ny*ky, :nx*kx, ...]

    new_shape=(ny,ky,nx,kx)+mat.shape[2:]

    if method=='max':
        result=numpy.nanmax(mat_pad.reshape(new_shape),axis=(1,3))
    else:
        result=numpy.nanmean(mat_pad.reshape(new_shape),axis=(1,3))

    return result

Sometimes you may want to perform overlapping pooling, at a stride not equal to the kernel size. Here is a function that does that, with or without padding:

def asStride(arr,sub_shape,stride):
    '''Get a strided sub-matrices view of an ndarray.
    See also skimage.util.shape.view_as_windows()
    '''
    s0,s1=arr.strides[:2]
    m1,n1=arr.shape[:2]
    m2,n2=sub_shape
    view_shape=(1+(m1-m2)//stride[0],1+(n1-n2)//stride[1],m2,n2)+arr.shape[2:]
    strides=(stride[0]*s0,stride[1]*s1,s0,s1)+arr.strides[2:]
    subs=numpy.lib.stride_tricks.as_strided(arr,view_shape,strides=strides)
    return subs

def poolingOverlap(mat,ksize,stride=None,method='max',pad=False):
    '''Overlapping pooling on 2D or 3D data.

    <mat>: ndarray, input array to pool.
    <ksize>: tuple of 2, kernel size in (ky, kx).
    <stride>: tuple of 2 or None, stride of pooling window.
              If None, same as <ksize> (non-overlapping pooling).
    <method>: str, 'max for max-pooling,
                   'mean' for mean-pooling.
    <pad>: bool, pad <mat> or not. If no pad, output has size
           (n-f)//s+1, n being <mat> size, f being kernel size, s stride.
           if pad, output has size ceil(n/s).

    Return <result>: pooled matrix.
    '''

    m, n = mat.shape[:2]
    ky,kx=ksize
    if stride is None:
        stride=(ky,kx)
    sy,sx=stride

    _ceil=lambda x,y: int(numpy.ceil(x/float(y)))

    if pad:
        ny=_ceil(m,sy)
        nx=_ceil(n,sx)
        size=((ny-1)*sy+ky, (nx-1)*sx+kx) + mat.shape[2:]
        mat_pad=numpy.full(size,numpy.nan)
        mat_pad[:m,:n,...]=mat
    else:
        mat_pad=mat[:(m-ky)//sy*sy+ky, :(n-kx)//sx*sx+kx, ...]

    view=asStride(mat_pad,ksize,stride)

    if method=='max':
        result=numpy.nanmax(view,axis=(2,3))
    else:
        result=numpy.nanmean(view,axis=(2,3))

    return result
5
  • 2
    This works 30x faster compared to the scikit's block_reduce. block_reduce: 9093 function calls in 0.035 seconds pooling: 10 function calls in 0.001 seconds – Tyathalae Apr 30 '19 at 12:15
  • 2
    @Tyathalae I may be missing some context around the analysis in your comment, but it seems to me that if there were 9093 function calls to Scikit's block_reduce in 0.035 seconds (1 every ~3.85μs) and only 10 function calls to the above pooling function in 0.001 seconds (1 every ~0.1ms), wouldn't that mean that Scikit's block_reduce is actually about ~26 times faster than the above implementation? Also, if I'm reading this correctly the difference in sample size (i.e. function calls) is very large. Could you clarify a bit? Thanks! – Greenstick Jul 24 '19 at 23:55
  • 2
    Hi @Greenstick, you are right, my comment is a bit ambiguous. It shows the number of functions (sub-calls) are made to complete that operation. So, scikit calls a total of 9093 sub-functions for a single block_reduce() call. Side note: That output format comes from cProfile. – Tyathalae Jul 25 '19 at 15:50
  • Ah gotcha! Thanks for the clarification : ) – Greenstick Jul 25 '19 at 21:11
  • Heads up: I believe poolingOverlap applies its kernel with the target pixel in the upper left of the kernel. This differs to the usual approach (in deep learning, in any case) of putting the target pixel in the middle of a kernel. This causes the results to be offset from what I expected. – RaveTheTadpole Feb 3 '20 at 19:05
1

Since the numpy documentation says to use "numpy.lib.stride_tricks.as_strided" with "extreme care", here is another solution for a 2D/3D pooling without it.

If strides=1, it results in using same padding. For strides>1, I am not 100% sure about how same padding is defined...

def pool3D(arr,
           kernel=(2, 2, 2),
           stride=(1, 1, 1),
           func=np.nanmax,
           ):
    # check inputs
    assert arr.ndim == 3
    assert len(kernel) == 3

    # create array with lots of padding around it, from which we grab stuff (could be more efficient, yes)
    arr_padded_shape = arr.shape + 2 * np.array(kernel)
    arr_padded = np.zeros(arr_padded_shape, dtype=arr.dtype) * np.nan
    arr_padded[
    kernel[0]:kernel[0] + arr.shape[0],
    kernel[1]:kernel[1] + arr.shape[1],
    kernel[2]:kernel[2] + arr.shape[2],
    ] = arr

    # create temporary array, which aggregates kernel elements in last axis
    size_x = 1 + (arr.shape[0]-1) // stride[0]
    size_y = 1 + (arr.shape[1]-1) // stride[1]
    size_z = 1 + (arr.shape[2]-1) // stride[2]
    size_kernel = np.prod(kernel)
    arr_tmp = np.empty((size_x, size_y, size_z, size_kernel), dtype=arr.dtype)

    # fill temporary array
    kx_center = (kernel[0] - 1) // 2
    ky_center = (kernel[1] - 1) // 2
    kz_center = (kernel[2] - 1) // 2
    idx_kernel = 0
    for kx in range(kernel[0]):
        dx = kernel[0] + kx - kx_center
        for ky in range(kernel[1]):
            dy = kernel[1] + ky - ky_center
            for kz in range(kernel[2]):
                dz = kernel[2] + kz - kz_center
                arr_tmp[:, :, :, idx_kernel] = arr_padded[
                                               dx:dx + arr.shape[0]:stride[0],
                                               dy:dy + arr.shape[1]:stride[1],
                                               dz:dz + arr.shape[2]:stride[2],
                                               ]
                idx_kernel += 1

    # perform pool function
    arr_final = func(arr_tmp, axis=-1)
    return arr_final


def pool2D(arr,
           kernel=(2, 2),
           stride=(1, 1),
           func=np.nanmax,
           ):
    # check inputs
    assert arr.ndim == 2
    assert len(kernel) == 2

    # transform into 3D array with empty dimension?
    arr3D = arr[..., np.newaxis]
    kernel3D = kernel + (1,)
    stride3D = stride + (1,)
    arr3D_final = pool3D(arr3D, kernel3D, stride3D, func)
    arr2D_final = arr3D_final[:, :, 0]

    return arr2D_final
0

Another solution uses the little-known magic of np.maximum.at (or you can adapt this to mean-pooling using np.add.at and dividing)

def max_pool(img, factor: int):
    """ Perform max pooling with a (factor x factor) kernel"""
    ds_img = np.full((img.shape[0] // factor, img.shape[1] // factor), -float('inf'), dtype=img.dtype)
    np.maximum.at(ds_img, (np.arange(img.shape[0])[:, None] // factor, np.arange(img.shape[1]) // factor), img)
    return ds_img

example usage:

img = np.array([[20, 200, -5, 23],
                [-13, 134, 119, 100],
                [120, 32, 49, 25],
                [-120, 12, 9, 23]])

print(f'Input: \n{img}')

print(f"Output: \n{max_pool(img, factor=2)}")

prints

Input: 
[[  20  200   -5   23]
 [ -13  134  119  100]
 [ 120   32   49   25]
 [-120   12    9   23]]
Output: 
[[200 119]
 [120  49]]

Unfortunately it appears to be a little slow though so I'd still go with the solution provided by mdh

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