I want my functions to return either an indication of success or an object that describes the nature of the failure. I'd normally use exceptions for this but I've been told not to use them for common code paths and this set of functions can be expected to fail fairly often for various reasons.

My thought is to use C++17's std::optional as I don't have to return a full error object when it's not needed. So with optional, if the function doesn't succeed it returns the error object, otherwise the optional is empty. The issue with that is it reverses the expectation of a returned value (i.e. true usually indicates success not failure).

I could get people to use an is_success function, which would be used like this, assuming Error is my error class:

auto result = do_stuff();
if (!is_success(result)) {
    Error err = *result;
    // ...
}

Or would a result class be more robust?

class MaybeError {
    std::optional<Error> _error;
public:
    MaybeError(const Error& error) : _error(error) {}
    constexpr MaybeError() : _error({}) {}

    explicit operator bool const() {
        return !(_error.operator bool());
    }
    constexpr bool has_error() const {
        return !(_error.has_value());
    }

    constexpr Error& error() & { return _error.value(); }
    constexpr const Error & error() const & { return _error.value(); }
    constexpr Error&& error() && { return std::move(_error.value()); }
    constexpr const Error&& error() const && { return std::move(_error.value()); }

    constexpr const Error* operator->() const { return _error.operator->(); }
    constexpr Error* operator->() { return _error.operator->(); }
    constexpr const Error& operator*() const& { return _error.operator*(); }
    constexpr Error& operator*() & { return _error.operator*(); }
    constexpr const Error&& operator*() const&& { return std::move(_error.operator*()); }
    constexpr Error&& operator*() && { return std::move(_error.operator*()); }
};

Which can be used similarly to the first example:

auto result = do_stuff();
if (!result) {
    Error err = *result;
    // ...
}

What is the best option? Am I going about this the right way?


Edit To be clear, the do_stuff function that's being called doesn't return an object if it succeeds. If it always succeeded without error it'd just be void do_stuff().


Edit 2 In the comments Christian Hackl suggests a less over-engineered solution using a simple struct.

struct MaybeError {
    std::optional<Error> error;
};

This would be both simpler and address my concern that people would expect functions to return true if successful by making it explicit that it is the error condition that is being tested for. E.g.:

auto result = do_stuff();
if (result.error) {
    Error e = *t.error;
    // ...
}
  • 4
    This seems remarkably complicated, when using exceptions would be much cleaner and simpler and involve less code. – Neil Butterworth Feb 26 '17 at 15:41
  • 2
    I would love to use exceptions but unfortunately my boss has strong feelings on the subject. – ChrisD Feb 26 '17 at 15:44
  • 2
    He's an idiot. Exceptions are not optional in good C++ code. – Neil Butterworth Feb 26 '17 at 15:45
  • 2
    Exceptions are not always the appropriate solution, and some places even compile with -fno-exceptions, so it's not even possible to use exceptions. You could look into the expected<T,E> type that was proposed for C++20. The current reference implementation can be found here. It's similar to Either E T from Haskell – IncongruentModulo1 Feb 26 '17 at 16:12
  • 3
    @NeilButterworth: Exceptions exist specifically for the use case in which the direct caller of a function does not handle an error occurred within the function. If the caller can and should handle the error, then a return value is best practice in C++, so the boss is hardly an idiot because of that. The MaybeError class proposed by the OP is awfully complicated, of course, but I guess that's just over-engineering and a simple struct MaybeError { bool has_error; std::optional<Error> error; }; or even just struct MaybeError { std::optional<Error> error; }; would be sufficient. – Christian Hackl Feb 26 '17 at 16:24
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I played around a bit with boost::expected that was suggested by Nicol Bolas. It seems to be really nice for this use case:

#include <iostream>
#include <system_error>
#include <boost/expected/expected.hpp>

using ExpectedVoid = boost::expected< void, std::error_code >;
using ExpectedInt = boost::expected< int, std::error_code >;

ExpectedVoid do_stuff( bool wantSuccess ) {
    if( wantSuccess )
        return {};
    return boost::make_unexpected( std::make_error_code( std::errc::operation_canceled ) );
}

ExpectedInt do_more_stuff( bool wantSuccess ) {
    if( wantSuccess )
        return 42;
    return boost::make_unexpected( std::make_error_code( std::errc::operation_canceled ) );
}

int main()
{
    for( bool wantSuccess : { false, true } )
    {
        if( auto res = do_stuff( wantSuccess ) )
            std::cout << "do_stuff successful!\n";
        else
            std::cout << "do_stuff error: " << res.error() << "\n";
    }

    std::cout << "\n";

    for( bool wantSuccess : { false, true } )
    {
        if( auto res = do_more_stuff( wantSuccess ) )
            std::cout << "do_more_stuff successful! Result: " << *res << "\n";
        else
            std::cout << "do_more_stuff error: " << res.error() << "\n";
    }

    return 0;
}

Output:

do_stuff error: generic:105
do_stuff successful!

do_more_stuff error: generic:105
do_more_stuff successful! Result: 42

You can download the source from the link at the beginning and just throw the files from the "include" directory of the source into your boost include directory ("boost" sub folder).

There are types designed for this. One proposed for standardization (PDF) is expected<T, E>. It's basically like a variant which can either have the desired value or an "error code" (T can be void if you just want to check to see if a process succeeded).

Of course, you could use an actual variant if you have access to such an implementation. But expected has a nicer interface that's designed for this scenario. And unlike std::variant from C++17, the proposed expected cannot be valueless_by_exception, since E is required to be a nothrow-moveable type (not exactly a high bar for most error codes).

  • My only issue with that is my do_stuff function doesn't need to return anything on success (see my edit). So the T type will be redundant. I guess I could use a bool and always set it to true on success. – ChrisD Feb 26 '17 at 17:04
  • 1
    @ChrisD: That's why expected allows you to set T to void. – Nicol Bolas Feb 26 '17 at 17:37
  • There is actually an implementation of expected - from a quick look at it it's really cool! See example usage in my answer. – zett42 Feb 26 '17 at 18:15

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