6
var change8 = function()
{
    console.log(a);
    console.log("End of function");
    a = 10;
}

change8();

Return Reference Error

var change8 = function()
{

    console.log(a);
    console.log("End of function");
    var a = 10;
}

change8();

Return Undefined

Why first code return Reference Error But Second code return undefined ?

4

Javascript does something called hoisting, in which before it executes, it looks for var declarations and creates those variables. Since you used var a in the second, it creates the variable, but it isn't defined when used. In the first one, a doesn't exist until you create it, so it's a reference error.

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  • 1
    This is actually the best explanation. Thanks – kind user Feb 26 '17 at 19:56
  • window.a; console.log(a); Return Reference error Global variable not assigned value global variable is not created? – Murad Sofiyev Feb 26 '17 at 20:20
  • Where are you seeing that? I just ran it in the web console and got no error – Jim Deville Feb 26 '17 at 20:23
  • window.a; console.log(a); Declare global variable but but not assigned value – Murad Sofiyev Feb 26 '17 at 20:24
  • Just calling window.a does not create it – Jim Deville Feb 26 '17 at 20:25
1

It is called variable hoisting. In JS declared variables are actually hoisted (moved up) to top of the scope they bound to, so in your case they are moved up to beginning of your function. In the second example a is treated as it is actually declared at the top of method before any of the assignments, then assigned to 10 later. So when you print a the variable is defined but its value is not assigned yet.

var change8 = function()
{
    var a;
    console.log(a);
    console.log("End of function");
    a = 10;
}

But in the first example a is not defined with var keyword so a will be treated as a global variable and won't be available until the assignment. Thus when it is called before the assignment the error will occur.

For understanding declaring variables with var keyword check the following answer

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  • window.a = 10; console.log(a); Return Reference error Global variable not assigned value global variable is not created? – Murad Sofiyev Feb 26 '17 at 20:16
  • You attached a to window which is the global object, then js search through hierarchy when you log a and find it on window object thus prints it. Since you have attached it to window object before calling it you don't get an exception, if you try otherwise you will get an exception. – cubbuk Feb 26 '17 at 20:20
  • create globar variable but not assigned value look like window.a; console.log(a) – Murad Sofiyev Feb 26 '17 at 20:23
  • 1
    why bring window.a to the discussion, it will only complicate the answer. hoisting is part of js ecosystem and will exist in non-browser environments like node too. – hg_git Feb 26 '17 at 20:26
  • I think your "ES 6" (i.e. ECMAScript 2015) inference is incorrect and you're confusing it with strict mode. Do you have a reference? Only variable declarations are "hoisted". – RobG Feb 26 '17 at 20:31
1
var change8 = function()
{
    console.log(a);
    console.log("End of function");
    a = 10;
}

change8();

variable a is assigned undefined in the global context since JavaScript only hoists declarations, not initializations. Consider the same code as -

var a; // is = undefined
       // in global context

var change8 = function()
{
    console.log(a);
    console.log("End of function");
    a = 10;
}

change8();

Hence you'll get - Uncaught ReferenceError: a is not defined

This won't happen in 2nd code because you've explicitly declared your variable with var. Read more about hoisting here.

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  • "variable a is hoisted to the top" No it isn't, undeclared variables are created as properties of the global object when the code assigning to them is executed, not before. So called "hoisting" occurs with declarations, and the variable is initialised to undefined so the comment "isn't defined yet" is also incorrect. – RobG Feb 26 '17 at 20:25
  • @RobG my confusion stems from 'variables in js have function level scope' so I thought (till now) that scope will still be limited to that particular function and it will be hoisted inside it only. – Abhinav Gauniyal Feb 26 '17 at 20:40
  • JavaScript only hoists declarations, not initializations – cubbuk Feb 26 '17 at 20:41
  • 1
    @AbhinavGauniyal—correct. Functions are parsed before execution begins (hence early syntax errors), but function bodies are only processed once control enters them (i.e. the function is called), until then they sit passively doing nothing but taking up space. ;-) – RobG Feb 26 '17 at 22:50
0

It is because,in the first snippet you are using 'a' before declaring it with var, thus 'a' belongs to the global scope, hence a reference error when you call your method because 'a' will only be in the global scope when the third line 'a = 10' was executed

In the second one 'a' is undefined because it is being used before it was declared using var, albeit it is still in the function's scope, when function is called during run-time, the first line 'console.log(a)' does not know 'a'

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