-1

Why does this compile?

struct A {};
struct B {
    B(A& _a) : a(_a) {}
    A   &a;
};

void f1(A&) {}
void f2(const B &b) { f1(b.a); }

int main() {
    A a;
    B b{a};
    f2(b);
    return 0;
}

Inside f2() b is const, so my understanding was that b.a should also be const. But it does compile and the compiler allows calling f1().

Replace 'A& a;' in struct B with 'A a;' and it no longer works. Now in f1() b.a indeed is const:

invalid initialization of reference of type 'A&' from expression of type 'const A'

Please help me understand this... Thanks.

5

When an object is const, it doesn't cause the reference members to also become const since the referent is not a part of the object itself. The reference member is just a piece of information representing the address of some other object. Whether or not the B object itself is immutable shouldn't affect whether it should be possible to mutate the objects it references.

If you make the B::a member a non-reference, as in A a;, then the B object will actually contain within itself an A object, so when the former is const, the latter will be too.

1

Inside f2() b is const, so my understanding was that b.a should also be const.

It is. If the instance is const then it's members will be, too. But look at the type of the member:

A & a;

That's a reference to A. Making that const yields a constant reference to A:

A & const a;

Not a reference to a constant A.

  • error: 'const' qualifiers cannot be applied to 'A&' – Jarek Feb 26 '17 at 23:02
  • Who says that? (In what context?) Yes, it is completely redundant. Anyway, it was more meant as thought experiment ;) – Daniel Jour Feb 26 '17 at 23:07
0

Strictly speaking there are no constant references. There are references to constant objects.

In the class B the data member a is declared like a reference to non-constant object of the type A.

A   &a;

and this reference is passed as an argument to a function that accepts a reference to a non-constant object

void f1(A&) {}
void f2(const B &b) { f1(b.a); }

Thus the code compiles successfully.

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