307

What does .view() do to a tensor x? What do negative values mean?

x = x.view(-1, 16 * 5 * 5)

9 Answers 9

411

view() reshapes the tensor without copying memory, similar to numpy's reshape().

Given a tensor a with 16 elements:

import torch
a = torch.range(1, 16)

To reshape this tensor to make it a 4 x 4 tensor, use:

a = a.view(4, 4)

Now a will be a 4 x 4 tensor. Note that after the reshape the total number of elements need to remain the same. Reshaping the tensor a to a 3 x 5 tensor would not be appropriate.

What is the meaning of parameter -1?

If there is any situation that you don't know how many rows you want but are sure of the number of columns, then you can specify this with a -1. (Note that you can extend this to tensors with more dimensions. Only one of the axis value can be -1). This is a way of telling the library: "give me a tensor that has these many columns and you compute the appropriate number of rows that is necessary to make this happen".

This can be seen in this model definition code. After the line x = self.pool(F.relu(self.conv2(x))) in the forward function, you will have a 16 depth feature map. You have to flatten this to give it to the fully connected layer. So you tell PyTorch to reshape the tensor you obtained to have specific number of columns and tell it to decide the number of rows by itself.

6
  • 128
    "view is similar to numpy's reshape" -- why didn't they just call it reshape in PyTorch?!
    – MWB
    Apr 30, 2017 at 1:53
  • 96
    @MaxB Unlike reshape, the new tensor returned by "view" shares the underlying data with the original tensor, so it is really a view into the old tensor instead of creating a brand new one.
    – qihqi
    May 4, 2017 at 5:28
  • 61
    @blckbird "reshape always copies memory. view never copies memory." github.com/torch/cutorch/issues/98
    – devinbost
    Jul 26, 2017 at 16:37
  • 10
    @devinbost Torch reshape always copies memory. NumPy reshape doesn't. Aug 2, 2018 at 19:48
  • 2
    Torch reshape does not always return copy. That's a very easy check. Same with numpy
    – Alleo
    Dec 22, 2020 at 2:33
47

Let's do some examples, from simpler to more difficult.

  1. The view method returns a tensor with the same data as the self tensor (which means that the returned tensor has the same number of elements), but with a different shape. For example:

    a = torch.arange(1, 17)  # a's shape is (16,)
    
    a.view(4, 4) # output below
      1   2   3   4
      5   6   7   8
      9  10  11  12
     13  14  15  16
    [torch.FloatTensor of size 4x4]
    
    a.view(2, 2, 4) # output below
    (0 ,.,.) = 
    1   2   3   4
    5   6   7   8
    
    (1 ,.,.) = 
     9  10  11  12
    13  14  15  16
    [torch.FloatTensor of size 2x2x4]
    
  2. Assuming that -1 is not one of the parameters, when you multiply them together, the result must be equal to the number of elements in the tensor. If you do: a.view(3, 3), it will raise a RuntimeError because shape (3 x 3) is invalid for input with 16 elements. In other words: 3 x 3 does not equal 16 but 9.

  3. You can use -1 as one of the parameters that you pass to the function, but only once. All that happens is that the method will do the math for you on how to fill that dimension. For example a.view(2, -1, 4) is equivalent to a.view(2, 2, 4). [16 / (2 x 4) = 2]

  4. Notice that the returned tensor shares the same data. If you make a change in the "view" you are changing the original tensor's data:

    b = a.view(4, 4)
    b[0, 2] = 2
    a[2] == 3.0
    False
    
  5. Now, for a more complex use case. The documentation says that each new view dimension must either be a subspace of an original dimension, or only span d, d + 1, ..., d + k that satisfy the following contiguity-like condition that for all i = 0, ..., k - 1, stride[i] = stride[i + 1] x size[i + 1]. Otherwise, contiguous() needs to be called before the tensor can be viewed. For example:

    a = torch.rand(5, 4, 3, 2) # size (5, 4, 3, 2)
    a_t = a.permute(0, 2, 3, 1) # size (5, 3, 2, 4)
    
    # The commented line below will raise a RuntimeError, because one dimension
    # spans across two contiguous subspaces
    # a_t.view(-1, 4)
    
    # instead do:
    a_t.contiguous().view(-1, 4)
    
    # To see why the first one does not work and the second does,
    # compare a.stride() and a_t.stride()
    a.stride() # (24, 6, 2, 1)
    a_t.stride() # (24, 2, 1, 6)
    

    Notice that for a_t, stride[0] != stride[1] x size[1] since 24 != 2 x 3

0
43

view() reshapes a tensor by 'stretching' or 'squeezing' its elements into the shape you specify:

enter image description here


How does view() work?

First let's look at what a tensor is under the hood:

enter image description here enter image description here
Tensor and its underlying storage e.g. the right-hand tensor (shape (3,2)) can be computed from the left-hand one with t2 = t1.view(3,2)

Here you see PyTorch makes a tensor by converting an underlying block of contiguous memory into a matrix-like object by adding a shape and stride attribute:

  • shape states how long each dimension is
  • stride states how many steps you need to take in memory til you reach the next element in each dimension

view(dim1,dim2,...) returns a view of the same underlying information, but reshaped to a tensor of shape dim1 x dim2 x ... (by modifying the shape and stride attributes).

Note this implicitly assumes that the new and old dimensions have the same product (i.e. the old and new tensor have the same volume).


PyTorch -1

-1 is a PyTorch alias for "infer this dimension given the others have all been specified" (i.e. the quotient of the original product by the new product). It is a convention taken from numpy.reshape().

Hence t1.view(3,2) in our example would be equivalent to t1.view(3,-1) or t1.view(-1,2).

16

torch.Tensor.view()

Simply put, torch.Tensor.view() which is inspired by numpy.ndarray.reshape() or numpy.reshape(), creates a new view of the tensor, as long as the new shape is compatible with the shape of the original tensor.

Let's understand this in detail using a concrete example.

In [43]: t = torch.arange(18) 

In [44]: t 
Out[44]: 
tensor([ 0,  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7,  8,  9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17])

With this tensor t of shape (18,), new views can only be created for the following shapes:

(1, 18) or equivalently (1, -1) or (-1, 18)
(2, 9) or equivalently (2, -1) or (-1, 9)
(3, 6) or equivalently (3, -1) or (-1, 6)
(6, 3) or equivalently (6, -1) or (-1, 3)
(9, 2) or equivalently (9, -1) or (-1, 2)
(18, 1) or equivalently (18, -1) or (-1, 1)

As we can already observe from the above shape tuples, the multiplication of the elements of the shape tuple (e.g. 2*9, 3*6 etc.) must always be equal to the total number of elements in the original tensor (18 in our example).

Another thing to observe is that we used a -1 in one of the places in each of the shape tuples. By using a -1, we are being lazy in doing the computation ourselves and rather delegate the task to PyTorch to do calculation of that value for the shape when it creates the new view. One important thing to note is that we can only use a single -1 in the shape tuple. The remaining values should be explicitly supplied by us. Else PyTorch will complain by throwing a RuntimeError:

RuntimeError: only one dimension can be inferred

So, with all of the above mentioned shapes, PyTorch will always return a new view of the original tensor t. This basically means that it just changes the stride information of the tensor for each of the new views that are requested.

Below are some examples illustrating how the strides of the tensors are changed with each new view.

# stride of our original tensor `t`
In [53]: t.stride() 
Out[53]: (1,)

Now, we will see the strides for the new views:

# shape (1, 18)
In [54]: t1 = t.view(1, -1)
# stride tensor `t1` with shape (1, 18)
In [55]: t1.stride() 
Out[55]: (18, 1)

# shape (2, 9)
In [56]: t2 = t.view(2, -1)
# stride of tensor `t2` with shape (2, 9)
In [57]: t2.stride()       
Out[57]: (9, 1)

# shape (3, 6)
In [59]: t3 = t.view(3, -1) 
# stride of tensor `t3` with shape (3, 6)
In [60]: t3.stride() 
Out[60]: (6, 1)

# shape (6, 3)
In [62]: t4 = t.view(6,-1)
# stride of tensor `t4` with shape (6, 3)
In [63]: t4.stride() 
Out[63]: (3, 1)

# shape (9, 2)
In [65]: t5 = t.view(9, -1) 
# stride of tensor `t5` with shape (9, 2)
In [66]: t5.stride()
Out[66]: (2, 1)

# shape (18, 1)
In [68]: t6 = t.view(18, -1)
# stride of tensor `t6` with shape (18, 1)
In [69]: t6.stride()
Out[69]: (1, 1)

So that's the magic of the view() function. It just changes the strides of the (original) tensor for each of the new views, as long as the shape of the new view is compatible with the original shape.

Another interesting thing one might observe from the strides tuples is that the value of the element in the 0th position is equal to the value of the element in the 1st position of the shape tuple.

In [74]: t3.shape 
Out[74]: torch.Size([3, 6])
                        |
In [75]: t3.stride()    |
Out[75]: (6, 1)         |
          |_____________|

This is because:

In [76]: t3 
Out[76]: 
tensor([[ 0,  1,  2,  3,  4,  5],
        [ 6,  7,  8,  9, 10, 11],
        [12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17]])

the stride (6, 1) says that to go from one element to the next element along the 0th dimension, we have to jump or take 6 steps. (i.e. to go from 0 to 6, one has to take 6 steps.) But to go from one element to the next element in the 1st dimension, we just need only one step (for e.g. to go from 2 to 3).

Thus, the strides information is at the heart of how the elements are accessed from memory for performing the computation.


torch.reshape()

This function would return a view and is exactly the same as using torch.Tensor.view() as long as the new shape is compatible with the shape of the original tensor. Otherwise, it will return a copy.

However, the notes of torch.reshape() warns that:

contiguous inputs and inputs with compatible strides can be reshaped without copying, but one should not depend on the copying vs. viewing behavior.

4

I figured it out that x.view(-1, 16 * 5 * 5) is equivalent to x.flatten(1), where the parameter 1 indicates the flatten process starts from the 1st dimension(not flattening the 'sample' dimension) As you can see, the latter usage is semantically more clear and easier to use, so I prefer flatten().

0
4

Let's try to understand view by the following examples:

    a=torch.range(1,16)

print(a)

    tensor([ 1.,  2.,  3.,  4.,  5.,  6.,  7.,  8.,  9., 10., 11., 12., 13., 14.,
            15., 16.])

print(a.view(-1,2))

    tensor([[ 1.,  2.],
            [ 3.,  4.],
            [ 5.,  6.],
            [ 7.,  8.],
            [ 9., 10.],
            [11., 12.],
            [13., 14.],
            [15., 16.]])

print(a.view(2,-1,4))   #3d tensor

    tensor([[[ 1.,  2.,  3.,  4.],
             [ 5.,  6.,  7.,  8.]],

            [[ 9., 10., 11., 12.],
             [13., 14., 15., 16.]]])
print(a.view(2,-1,2))

    tensor([[[ 1.,  2.],
             [ 3.,  4.],
             [ 5.,  6.],
             [ 7.,  8.]],

            [[ 9., 10.],
             [11., 12.],
             [13., 14.],
             [15., 16.]]])

print(a.view(4,-1,2))

    tensor([[[ 1.,  2.],
             [ 3.,  4.]],

            [[ 5.,  6.],
             [ 7.,  8.]],

            [[ 9., 10.],
             [11., 12.]],

            [[13., 14.],
             [15., 16.]]])

-1 as an argument value is an easy way to compute the value of say x provided we know values of y, z or the other way round in case of 3d and for 2d again an easy way to compute the value of say x provided we know values of y or vice versa..

1
3

What is the meaning of parameter -1?

You can read -1 as dynamic number of parameters or "anything". Because of that there can be only one parameter -1 in view().

If you ask x.view(-1,1) this will output tensor shape [anything, 1] depending on the number of elements in x. For example:

import torch
x = torch.tensor([1, 2, 3, 4])
print(x,x.shape)
print("...")
print(x.view(-1,1), x.view(-1,1).shape)
print(x.view(1,-1), x.view(1,-1).shape)

Will output:

tensor([1, 2, 3, 4]) torch.Size([4])
...
tensor([[1],
        [2],
        [3],
        [4]]) torch.Size([4, 1])
tensor([[1, 2, 3, 4]]) torch.Size([1, 4])
3

weights.reshape(a, b) will return a new tensor with the same data as weights with size (a, b) as in it copies the data to another part of memory.

weights.resize_(a, b) returns the same tensor with a different shape. However, if the new shape results in fewer elements than the original tensor, some elements will be removed from the tensor (but not from memory). If the new shape results in more elements than the original tensor, new elements will be uninitialized in memory.

weights.view(a, b) will return a new tensor with the same data as weights with size (a, b)

1

I really liked @Jadiel de Armas examples.

I would like to add a small insight to how elements are ordered for .view(...)

  • For a Tensor with shape (a,b,c), the order of it's elements are determined by a numbering system: where the first digit has a numbers, second digit has b numbers and third digit has c numbers.
  • The mapping of the elements in the new Tensor returned by .view(...) preserves this order of the original Tensor.

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