Is there any way, I can print the summary of a model in PyTorch like model.summary() method does in Keras as follows?

Model Summary:
____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Layer (type)                     Output Shape          Param #     Connected to                     
====================================================================================================
input_1 (InputLayer)             (None, 1, 15, 27)     0                                            
____________________________________________________________________________________________________
convolution2d_1 (Convolution2D)  (None, 8, 15, 27)     872         input_1[0][0]                    
____________________________________________________________________________________________________
maxpooling2d_1 (MaxPooling2D)    (None, 8, 7, 27)      0           convolution2d_1[0][0]            
____________________________________________________________________________________________________
flatten_1 (Flatten)              (None, 1512)          0           maxpooling2d_1[0][0]             
____________________________________________________________________________________________________
dense_1 (Dense)                  (None, 1)             1513        flatten_1[0][0]                  
====================================================================================================
Total params: 2,385
Trainable params: 2,385
Non-trainable params: 0
  • Have you seen the state_dict() method on the module?? It gives you the different parameters of the model. There is no direct summary method, but one could form one using the state_dict() method – Kashyap Feb 27 '17 at 10:13
up vote 39 down vote accepted

While you will not get as detailed information about the model as in Keras' model.summary, simply printing the model will give you some idea about the different layers involved and their specifications.

For instance:

from torchvision import models
model = models.vgg16()
print(model)

The output in this case would be something as follows:

VGG (
  (features): Sequential (
    (0): Conv2d(3, 64, kernel_size=(3, 3), stride=(1, 1), padding=(1, 1))
    (1): ReLU (inplace)
    (2): Conv2d(64, 64, kernel_size=(3, 3), stride=(1, 1), padding=(1, 1))
    (3): ReLU (inplace)
    (4): MaxPool2d (size=(2, 2), stride=(2, 2), dilation=(1, 1))
    (5): Conv2d(64, 128, kernel_size=(3, 3), stride=(1, 1), padding=(1, 1))
    (6): ReLU (inplace)
    (7): Conv2d(128, 128, kernel_size=(3, 3), stride=(1, 1), padding=(1, 1))
    (8): ReLU (inplace)
    (9): MaxPool2d (size=(2, 2), stride=(2, 2), dilation=(1, 1))
    (10): Conv2d(128, 256, kernel_size=(3, 3), stride=(1, 1), padding=(1, 1))
    (11): ReLU (inplace)
    (12): Conv2d(256, 256, kernel_size=(3, 3), stride=(1, 1), padding=(1, 1))
    (13): ReLU (inplace)
    (14): Conv2d(256, 256, kernel_size=(3, 3), stride=(1, 1), padding=(1, 1))
    (15): ReLU (inplace)
    (16): MaxPool2d (size=(2, 2), stride=(2, 2), dilation=(1, 1))
    (17): Conv2d(256, 512, kernel_size=(3, 3), stride=(1, 1), padding=(1, 1))
    (18): ReLU (inplace)
    (19): Conv2d(512, 512, kernel_size=(3, 3), stride=(1, 1), padding=(1, 1))
    (20): ReLU (inplace)
    (21): Conv2d(512, 512, kernel_size=(3, 3), stride=(1, 1), padding=(1, 1))
    (22): ReLU (inplace)
    (23): MaxPool2d (size=(2, 2), stride=(2, 2), dilation=(1, 1))
    (24): Conv2d(512, 512, kernel_size=(3, 3), stride=(1, 1), padding=(1, 1))
    (25): ReLU (inplace)
    (26): Conv2d(512, 512, kernel_size=(3, 3), stride=(1, 1), padding=(1, 1))
    (27): ReLU (inplace)
    (28): Conv2d(512, 512, kernel_size=(3, 3), stride=(1, 1), padding=(1, 1))
    (29): ReLU (inplace)
    (30): MaxPool2d (size=(2, 2), stride=(2, 2), dilation=(1, 1))
  )
  (classifier): Sequential (
    (0): Dropout (p = 0.5)
    (1): Linear (25088 -> 4096)
    (2): ReLU (inplace)
    (3): Dropout (p = 0.5)
    (4): Linear (4096 -> 4096)
    (5): ReLU (inplace)
    (6): Linear (4096 -> 1000)
  )
)

Now you could, as mentioned by Kashyap, use the state_dict method to get the weights of the different layers. But using this listing of the layers would perhaps provide more direction is creating a helper function to get that Keras like model summary! Hope this helps!

Yes, you can get exact Keras representation, using pytorch-summary package.

Example for VGG16

from torchvision import models
from torchsummary import summary

vgg = models.vgg16()
summary(vgg, (3, 224, 224))

----------------------------------------------------------------
        Layer (type)               Output Shape         Param #
================================================================
            Conv2d-1         [-1, 64, 224, 224]           1,792
              ReLU-2         [-1, 64, 224, 224]               0
            Conv2d-3         [-1, 64, 224, 224]          36,928
              ReLU-4         [-1, 64, 224, 224]               0
         MaxPool2d-5         [-1, 64, 112, 112]               0
            Conv2d-6        [-1, 128, 112, 112]          73,856
              ReLU-7        [-1, 128, 112, 112]               0
            Conv2d-8        [-1, 128, 112, 112]         147,584
              ReLU-9        [-1, 128, 112, 112]               0
        MaxPool2d-10          [-1, 128, 56, 56]               0
           Conv2d-11          [-1, 256, 56, 56]         295,168
             ReLU-12          [-1, 256, 56, 56]               0
           Conv2d-13          [-1, 256, 56, 56]         590,080
             ReLU-14          [-1, 256, 56, 56]               0
           Conv2d-15          [-1, 256, 56, 56]         590,080
             ReLU-16          [-1, 256, 56, 56]               0
        MaxPool2d-17          [-1, 256, 28, 28]               0
           Conv2d-18          [-1, 512, 28, 28]       1,180,160
             ReLU-19          [-1, 512, 28, 28]               0
           Conv2d-20          [-1, 512, 28, 28]       2,359,808
             ReLU-21          [-1, 512, 28, 28]               0
           Conv2d-22          [-1, 512, 28, 28]       2,359,808
             ReLU-23          [-1, 512, 28, 28]               0
        MaxPool2d-24          [-1, 512, 14, 14]               0
           Conv2d-25          [-1, 512, 14, 14]       2,359,808
             ReLU-26          [-1, 512, 14, 14]               0
           Conv2d-27          [-1, 512, 14, 14]       2,359,808
             ReLU-28          [-1, 512, 14, 14]               0
           Conv2d-29          [-1, 512, 14, 14]       2,359,808
             ReLU-30          [-1, 512, 14, 14]               0
        MaxPool2d-31            [-1, 512, 7, 7]               0
           Linear-32                 [-1, 4096]     102,764,544
             ReLU-33                 [-1, 4096]               0
          Dropout-34                 [-1, 4096]               0
           Linear-35                 [-1, 4096]      16,781,312
             ReLU-36                 [-1, 4096]               0
          Dropout-37                 [-1, 4096]               0
           Linear-38                 [-1, 1000]       4,097,000
================================================================
Total params: 138,357,544
Trainable params: 138,357,544
Non-trainable params: 0
----------------------------------------------------------------
Input size (MB): 0.57
Forward/backward pass size (MB): 218.59
Params size (MB): 527.79
Estimated Total Size (MB): 746.96
----------------------------------------------------------------
  • I got an error saying, Expected object of backend CPU but got backend CUDA for argument #4 'mat1' and it seems there's no documentation. – David Jung 5 hours ago
  • Found a solution. summary(model.cuda(), (INPUT_SHAPE)) works. – David Jung 2 hours ago

This will show a model's weights and parameters (but not output shape).

from torch.nn.modules.module import _addindent
import torch
import numpy as np
def torch_summarize(model, show_weights=True, show_parameters=True):
    """Summarizes torch model by showing trainable parameters and weights."""
    tmpstr = model.__class__.__name__ + ' (\n'
    for key, module in model._modules.items():
        # if it contains layers let call it recursively to get params and weights
        if type(module) in [
            torch.nn.modules.container.Container,
            torch.nn.modules.container.Sequential
        ]:
            modstr = torch_summarize(module)
        else:
            modstr = module.__repr__()
        modstr = _addindent(modstr, 2)

        params = sum([np.prod(p.size()) for p in module.parameters()])
        weights = tuple([tuple(p.size()) for p in module.parameters()])

        tmpstr += '  (' + key + '): ' + modstr 
        if show_weights:
            tmpstr += ', weights={}'.format(weights)
        if show_parameters:
            tmpstr +=  ', parameters={}'.format(params)
        tmpstr += '\n'   

    tmpstr = tmpstr + ')'
    return tmpstr

# Test
import torchvision.models as models
model = models.alexnet()
print(torch_summarize(model))

# # Output
# AlexNet (
#   (features): Sequential (
#     (0): Conv2d(3, 64, kernel_size=(11, 11), stride=(4, 4), padding=(2, 2)), weights=((64, 3, 11, 11), (64,)), parameters=23296
#     (1): ReLU (inplace), weights=(), parameters=0
#     (2): MaxPool2d (size=(3, 3), stride=(2, 2), dilation=(1, 1)), weights=(), parameters=0
#     (3): Conv2d(64, 192, kernel_size=(5, 5), stride=(1, 1), padding=(2, 2)), weights=((192, 64, 5, 5), (192,)), parameters=307392
#     (4): ReLU (inplace), weights=(), parameters=0
#     (5): MaxPool2d (size=(3, 3), stride=(2, 2), dilation=(1, 1)), weights=(), parameters=0
#     (6): Conv2d(192, 384, kernel_size=(3, 3), stride=(1, 1), padding=(1, 1)), weights=((384, 192, 3, 3), (384,)), parameters=663936
#     (7): ReLU (inplace), weights=(), parameters=0
#     (8): Conv2d(384, 256, kernel_size=(3, 3), stride=(1, 1), padding=(1, 1)), weights=((256, 384, 3, 3), (256,)), parameters=884992
#     (9): ReLU (inplace), weights=(), parameters=0
#     (10): Conv2d(256, 256, kernel_size=(3, 3), stride=(1, 1), padding=(1, 1)), weights=((256, 256, 3, 3), (256,)), parameters=590080
#     (11): ReLU (inplace), weights=(), parameters=0
#     (12): MaxPool2d (size=(3, 3), stride=(2, 2), dilation=(1, 1)), weights=(), parameters=0
#   ), weights=((64, 3, 11, 11), (64,), (192, 64, 5, 5), (192,), (384, 192, 3, 3), (384,), (256, 384, 3, 3), (256,), (256, 256, 3, 3), (256,)), parameters=2469696
#   (classifier): Sequential (
#     (0): Dropout (p = 0.5), weights=(), parameters=0
#     (1): Linear (9216 -> 4096), weights=((4096, 9216), (4096,)), parameters=37752832
#     (2): ReLU (inplace), weights=(), parameters=0
#     (3): Dropout (p = 0.5), weights=(), parameters=0
#     (4): Linear (4096 -> 4096), weights=((4096, 4096), (4096,)), parameters=16781312
#     (5): ReLU (inplace), weights=(), parameters=0
#     (6): Linear (4096 -> 1000), weights=((1000, 4096), (1000,)), parameters=4097000
#   ), weights=((4096, 9216), (4096,), (4096, 4096), (4096,), (1000, 4096), (1000,)), parameters=58631144
# )

Edit: isaykatsman has a pytorch PR to add a model.summary() that is exactly like keras https://github.com/pytorch/pytorch/pull/3043/files

Simplest to remember (not as pretty as Keras):

print(model)

This also work:

repr(model)

If you just want the number of parameters:

sum([param.nelement() for param in model.parameters()])

From: Is there similar pytorch function as model.summary() as keras? (forum.PyTorch.org)

AFAK there is no model.summary() like equivalent in pytorch

Meanwhile you can refer script by szagoruyko, which gives a nice visualizaton like in resnet18-example

Cheers

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