3

Background:

I'm currently working my way through the edX | Intermediate C++ course. Although the course is being led by Microsoft, it did not state that you would need to use their IDE Visual Studios to complete successfully. I only have a Mac, so I did the introduction course using Xcode with no worries at all.

Question:

During the first module of the intermediate course, it states you can declare a class inside your header as static like so:

// Math.h
// Header file for the Math class

#pragma once

// Math class definition
static class Math
{
    public:

    // given base and exponent, calculate value
    static int Math::pow(int base, int exp);

};

Xcode flagged errors saying that:

'static' is not permitted on a declaration of a type

According to a previous SO question asked here, this is not possible to do but I'm unsure if this has changed since the question was answered in 2008 or maybe this is compiler specific/VS feature which has been added by Microsoft to confuse people.

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  • 1
    If you want only public static member functions in a class, then you could just use a namespace instead. As for your problem, it have never been valid to add linkage specifiers like static to classes or structures in C++. – Some programmer dude Feb 27 '17 at 8:29
  • Or like with Java just use a private constructor and static methods, you don't have to define the class as static. – xander Feb 27 '17 at 8:31
  • Thanks both. I just did a little Google and can see what your saying. The main issue is that I'm guessing this is not possible with C++? And if so, why are Microsoft teaching this? – Kitson88 Feb 27 '17 at 8:32
  • 4
    It could be a C++/CLI feature? C++/CLI is an extended variant of C++ with .NET and many non-portable and non-standard features. – Some programmer dude Feb 27 '17 at 8:37
  • 1
    Please note that also the Math:: qualifier in Math::pow declaration is also extraneous, which should also result in a compilation error. – Fatih BAKIR Feb 27 '17 at 9:13
3

static in this context isn't valid. An alternative is all-static members, but the class itself isn't valid.

A similar use of the syntax would be:

static class Math
{

    public:

    // given base and exponent, calculate value
    static int Math::pow(int base, int exp);

} math;  // <---- note object

in which case the object math is static, not the class itself.

1
  • Thanks for this. I think it would make more sense (and easier to read) to remove the static keyword and just make the methods I need static static. – Kitson88 Feb 27 '17 at 8:56
1

Just remove the static keyword before class. Everything in the exercise will still make sense exactly in the same way.

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