2

I have a very large nested list like this one:

a_lis = [[{'A': 'the', 'B': 'US3---'}, {'A': 'the', 'B': 'PS3N'}, {'A': 'the', 'B': 'P3N'}, {'A': 'quick', 'B': 'GS'}, {'A': 'quick', 'B': 'NCMSN-'}, {'A': 'fox', 'B': 'YN-'}, {'A': 'it', 'B': 'VI--2PSA--N-'}, {'A': 'jumping', 'B': 'GNM-'}]]

How can to transform it into?:

[('the', 'US3---'), ('the', 'PS3N'), ('the', 'P3N'), ('quick', 'GS'), ('quick', 'NCMSN-'), ('fox', 'YN-'), ('it's, 'VI--2PSA--N-'), ('jumping', 'GNM-')]

I tried to:

tuples = ['{}'.join(x) for x in a_list[0]]

And:

values = [','.join(str(v) for v in a_list)]

The main issue is that I do not how to manage the }{ characters. Could somebody explain which is the best way to manage them with a comprehension list?.

4
  • 2
    Is the second list in the original structure a typo or is it actually like that? How many inner lists do you have?
    – Ma0
    Feb 27 '17 at 15:35
  • @Elmex80s I fixed that.
    – Ma0
    Feb 27 '17 at 15:37
  • It is actually like that. That's why I used [0]. Just one list, thanks for the help! @Ev.Kounis
    – J.Do
    Feb 27 '17 at 15:37
  • 2
    @J.Do. Is the order of the items in the tuples significant? If so, are the keys in the dict really "A" and "B"?
    – ekhumoro
    Feb 27 '17 at 15:40
4

Fixing the syntax error with strings in your input line, you could the correct ensure order with something like

>>> list(map(lambda d: (d['A'], d['B']), a_lis[0]))

[('the', 'US3---'),
 ('the', 'PS3N'),
 ('the', 'P3N'),
 ('quick', 'GS'),
 ('quick', 'NCMSN-'),
 ('fox', 'YN-'),
 ("it's", 'VI--2PSA--N-'),
 ('jumping', 'GNM-')]

or equivalently with a list comprehension

>>> [(d['A'], d['B']) for d in a_lis[0]]

[('the', 'US3---'),
 ('the', 'PS3N'),
 ('the', 'P3N'),
 ('quick', 'GS'),
 ('quick', 'NCMSN-'),
 ('fox', 'YN-'),
 ("it's", 'VI--2PSA--N-'),
 ('jumping', 'GNM-')]

If a_lis had items beyond further lists beyond the first index you wanted to also have in the list of tuples, you could unpack.

list(map(lambda d: (d['A'], d['B']), *a_lis))
0
2
[tuple(j.values()) for i in a_lis for j in i]
1

You can get what you want by calling tuple on the values in each dictionary:

nested = a_lis[0]
value_tuples = [tuple(dictionary.values()) for dictionary in nested]

If you need the tuples to be sorted on key:

nested = a_lis[0]
value_tuples = [tuple(dictionary[k] for k in sorted(dictionary)) for dictionary in nested]
1

Chain the lists and provide them to tuple:

from itertools import chain

tps = [tuple(i.values()) for i in chain.from_iterable(a_lis)]

The variable tps now (randomly) holds:

[('the', 'US3---'),
 ('the', 'PS3N'),
 ('the', 'P3N'),
 ('quick', 'GS'),
 ('quick', 'NCMSN-'),
 ('fox', 'YN-'),
 ('its', 'VI--2PSA--N-'),
 ('jumping', 'GNM-')]

If you need to deterministically handle the creation of tuples you should first transform all nested dictionaries into ordered dictionaries:

from collections import OrderedDict

a_lis = [OrderedDict(d) for d in a_lis[0]]

and then perform the dictionary conversion as previously.

3
  • 1
    I didn't downvote. But isn't it just coincidence that you get the correct ordering here and other dictionaries would not necessarily give the expected output?
    – roganjosh
    Feb 27 '17 at 15:41
  • 1
    it is a coincidence all right (except on python 3.6) (I didn't downvote either, I may have an idea of who did :)) Feb 27 '17 at 15:44
  • 1
    Yes, it is @roganjosh I completely forget that nowdays :-). Feb 27 '17 at 15:56
1

your nested list has a "quote" issue somewhere. Once fixed you can recreate the tuples from the dictionary values using a list comprehension:

a_lis = [[{'A': 'the', 'B': 'US3---'}, {'A': 'the', 'B': 'PS3N'}, {'A': 'the', 'B': 'P3N'}, {'A': 'quick', 'B': 'GS'}, {'A': 'quick', 'B': 'NCMSN-'}, {'A': 'fox', 'B': 'YN-'}, {'A': "it's", 'B': 'VI--2PSA--N-'}, {'A': 'jumping', 'B': 'GNM-'}]]

n = [tuple(a.values()) for a in a_lis[0]]

print(n)

you get:

[('US3---', 'the'), ('PS3N', 'the'), ('P3N', 'the'), ('GS', 'quick'), ('NCMSN-', 'quick'), ('YN-', 'fox'), ('VI--2PSA--N-', "it's"), ('GNM-', 'jumping')]

As someone noted, unless you're using Python 3.6, you get the natural internal order of the dictionary by doing this (not necessarily the input order), which may not be what you want.

3
  • dictionaries do not have an order. so what guarantees the values will be in the right order?
    – Elmex80s
    Feb 27 '17 at 15:38
  • Sorting? No that won't help unfortunately.
    – Elmex80s
    Feb 27 '17 at 15:41
  • use Python 3.6 if you need that, else, nothing can help you if you input the dict as is, but maybe manual parsing... Feb 27 '17 at 15:42

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