1

Well, I have a class Human that implement IComparable<Human>

Then I have two more classes that inherit from Human Child:Human and Cousin:Human

The Parent class has a property AGE that has in the getter a call to a function getAge() which is abstract.

I have a List of Humans and when I display them in a datagrid every age is calculated properly.

I want to sort the list using age as attribute so I make the Human abstract class to implement Icomparable and then the method like this.

public int CompareTo(Human other)
{
     return this.age.CompareTo(other.age);
}

I invoke the list.sort() method in the ASP like this

List<Human> hlist = instance.humanlist;
hlist.Sort();
tblHumans.DataSource = hlist;
tblHumans.DataBind();

The page loads with all the data but the items are not ordered by age, it seems ordered by position in the list.

My tblHumans is

<asp:GridView ID="tblHumans" runat="server">
</asp:GridView>

In the Parent class the attribute AGE is like this

public int Age
{
    get
    {
        return getAge();
    }

    set
    {
        age = getAge();
    }
}

getAge() is an abstract method that my child classes overrides

The calculation is returns values correctly, when the table is rendered every single value is there with the right results.

What I am doing wrong?

  • 1
    Unrelated to your question, but it doesn't make sense to make Child and Cousin inherit from Human... "child" and "cousin" are relationships, not types of human. – Thomas Levesque Feb 27 '17 at 17:14
  • Have you tried setting a breakpoint in your CompareTo method to ensure that it's called? – Thomas Levesque Feb 27 '17 at 17:14
  • Your question lacks info about what type tblHumans is of. Most probably, DataSource property ignores ordering unless you use some specific collection, for example, BindingList. – Sergey.quixoticaxis.Ivanov Feb 27 '17 at 17:18
  • 1
    Your setter is wrong. It should be = value;. – Lasse V. Karlsen Feb 27 '17 at 17:31
  • 1
    I would be wary of using IComparable for this. What happens when someone wants to sort humans by name? IComparable is best used for value types with a single well-defined ordering. For example, the .NET struct BigInteger implements this because integers have a single well-known ordering. For cases where you want to sort based upon attributes of a complex object, you are better off either using lambdas (with List.Sort or LINQ's OrderBy) or by implementing an IComparer (e.g. HumanAgeComparer). – Michael Gunter Feb 27 '17 at 17:45
3

Short answer

public int CompareTo(Human other)
{
     return this.Age.CompareTo(other.Age);
}

(Age, not age)

Longer answer

Your implementation of the Age property is broken. You have an age field, but its value is not used by the getter (which just calls getAge()). And the setter ignores the implicit value argument, so it just assigns age to the result of getAge(). So, while the setter hasn't been called, age isn't initialized and its value is 0. You probably shouldn't have a setter at all, and you should remove the age field, since the value of Age is only decided by the implementation of getAge().

  • If I remove the age field how can I use it in the grid? the only reason I put the age property is because i need to sort it by it – Alexev Feb 27 '17 at 17:36
  • Well, actually that worked with a sligth difference, I just made this method public int CompareTo(Human other) { return this.getAge().CompareTo(other.getAge()); } now I need to figure out how to show that data on the grid because it is not longer on the object – Alexev Feb 27 '17 at 17:45
  • @Alexev you should compare by the property (Age), not the field (age). The field is an implementation detail, and from the code you posted, you're not really using it. Implementations of getAge() may use a field to store the value, but you don't need to care about this when comparing the values. – Thomas Levesque Feb 27 '17 at 17:52
0

Debug your problem like this,

List<Human> hlist = instance.humanlist;
hlist.Sort();

// What is the order of the elements here, have they been sorted as you expect?    

tblHumans.DataSource = hlist;
tblHumans.DataBind();

If the list is sorted as you expect, then the problem is with the grid, if not, then you haven't implemented IComparable or the Age property properly. Which is it?

0

Ok, I fix it

thank you all for the time you took reading and answering this question.

At last I made this:

1) set again the age property and field with normal getter and setter 2) in the child class when I override the getAge method I force set the age too, so, when the compareTo is called in the sort method of the list the age property is populated so it is shown in the table.

I know it is not 'the best practic' but It has to be made this way because in this program I cannot use 'complex' data models (not even a database, but dont worry is not for a production system)

Thanks all again

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