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I was writing some code where I was getting an unexpected output in one part of the program, which in turn disrupted the entire system.

The code can be simplified and shortened to:

char ch;
printf("Enter Number: ");

while ((ch = getchar()) != '\n') {
   if (ch >= 65 && ch <= 67)  {
         ch = 2;
   }
   putchar(ch);
}

As per the code above, I am trying to print a character/integer sequence of the user's choice. The numbers should remain unchanged whereas if the user enters letter A, then this should print 2.

Expected Output

Enter Number: 23-AB
23-22

Actual Output

Enter Number: 23-AB
23-☺☺

Once confronted with this problem, I decided to tweak some things and came up with the following code which worked perfectly. It uses the same approach but produces different output:

char input;
printf("\nEnter Number: ");

while ((ch = getchar()) != '\n') {  

    switch (toupper(ch)) {   //toupper function not really needed since I am expecting the user to enter upper-case letters ONLY
    case 'A': case 'B': case 'C':
        printf("2");
        break;
    default:
        putchar(ch);
    }
}

Expected Output

Enter Number: 23-AB
23-22

Actual Output

Enter Number: 23-AB
23-22

I am unable to comprehend why I am failing to convert the ASCII value of the characters entered in the first code to a single integer. What is the reason for this difference in the outputs? I have simply changed the type of controlling expression, from if-statement to a switch-statement (or so I think). How can I alter the first code to provide me with the same output as the second code?

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    ch = 2; --> ch = '2';, and the result of getchar() is an int (not a char) – David Ranieri Feb 27 '17 at 20:10
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    Don't use magic numbers! Is 'A' instead of 65 etc. too clear? – too honest for this site Feb 27 '17 at 20:12
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In the first version, setting ch=2; makes ch the character with ASCII value 2, not the character 2. ch=0x32; in your first version would probably work, since ASCII 50 = 0x32 is character 2. Even easier (and better, as Weather Vane points out) is ch='2';.

In your second version, you are using printf("2"). As a result, the compiler is producing the ASCII value for you when it processes the string "2", just as it would for ch='2';. Try printf("%d\n",'2'); and you should see 50.

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    Please do not use magic numbers which assume how characters are encoded. Keine Lust who you originally quoted used '2' not 0x32. – Weather Vane Feb 27 '17 at 20:13

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