9

Suppose I have a data frame as follows:

> foo = data.frame(x = 1:9, id = c(1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3))
> foo
  x id
1 1  1
2 2  1
3 3  2
4 4  2
5 5  2
6 6  3
7 7  3
8 8  3
9 9  3

I want a very efficient implementation of h(a, b) that computes sums all (a - xi)*(b - xj) for xi, xj belonging to the same id class. For example, my current implementation is

h(a, b, foo){
  a.diff = a - foo$x
  b.diff = b - foo$x
  prod = a.diff%*%t(b.diff)
  id.indicator = as.matrix(ifelse(dist(foo$id, diag = T, upper = T),0,1)) + diag(nrow(foo))
  return(sum(prod*id.indicator))
}

For example, with (a, b) = (0, 1), here is the output from each step in the function

> a.diff
[1] -1 -2 -3 -4 -5 -6 -7 -8 -9
> b.diff
[1]  0 -1 -2 -3 -4 -5 -6 -7 -8
> prod
      [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8] [,9]
 [1,]    0    1    2    3    4    5    6    7    8
 [2,]    0    2    4    6    8   10   12   14   16
 [3,]    0    3    6    9   12   15   18   21   24
 [4,]    0    4    8   12   16   20   24   28   32
 [5,]    0    5   10   15   20   25   30   35   40
 [6,]    0    6   12   18   24   30   36   42   48
 [7,]    0    7   14   21   28   35   42   49   56
 [8,]    0    8   16   24   32   40   48   56   64
 [9,]    0    9   18   27   36   45   54   63   72
> id.indicator
  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0
4 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0
5 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0
6 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1
7 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1
8 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1
9 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1

In reality, there can be up to 1000 id clusters, and each cluster will be at least 40, making this method too inefficient because of the sparse entries in id.indicator and extra computations in prod on the off-block-diagonals which won't be used.

  • 2
    Simpler, and still pretty snappy: h <- function(a, b, foo){sum(tapply(foo$x, foo$id, function(x){sum(tcrossprod(a - x, b - x))}))} – alistaire Feb 27 '17 at 22:05
3

tapply lets you apply a function across groups of a vector, and will simplify the results to a matrix or vector if it can. Using tcrossprod to multiply all the combinations for each group, and on some suitably large data it performs well:

# setup
set.seed(47)
foo = data.frame(x = 1:9, id = c(1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3))
foo2 <- data.frame(id = sample(1000, 40000, TRUE), x = rnorm(40000))

h_OP <- function(a, b, foo){
  a.diff = a - foo$x
  b.diff = b - foo$x
  prod = a.diff %*% t(b.diff)
  id.indicator = as.matrix(ifelse(dist(foo$id, diag = T, upper = T),0,1)) + diag(nrow(foo))
  return(sum(prod * id.indicator))
}

h3_AEBilgrau <- function(a, b, foo) {
  a.diff <- a - foo$x
  b.diff <- b - foo$x
  ids <- unique(foo$id)
  res <- 0
  for (i in seq_along(ids)) {
    indx <- which(foo$id == ids[i])
    res <- res + sum(tcrossprod(a.diff[indx], b.diff[indx]))
  }
  return(res)
}

h_d.b <- function(a, b, foo){
  sum(sapply(split(foo, foo$id), function(d) sum(outer(a-d$x, b-d$x))))
}

h_alistaire <- function(a, b, foo){
  sum(tapply(foo$x, foo$id, function(x){sum(tcrossprod(a - x, b - x))}))
}

All return the same thing, and are not that different on small data:

h_OP(0, 1, foo)
#> [1] 891
h3_AEBilgrau(0, 1, foo)
#> [1] 891
h_d.b(0, 1, foo)
#> [1] 891
h_alistaire(0, 1, foo)
#> [1] 891

# small data test
microbenchmark::microbenchmark(
  h_OP(0, 1, foo), 
  h3_AEBilgrau(0, 1, foo), 
  h_d.b(0, 1, foo), 
  h_alistaire(0, 1, foo)
)
#> Unit: microseconds
#>                     expr     min       lq     mean   median       uq      max neval cld
#>          h_OP(0, 1, foo) 143.749 157.8895 189.5092 189.7235 214.3115  262.258   100  b 
#>  h3_AEBilgrau(0, 1, foo)  80.970  93.8195 112.0045 106.9285 125.9835  225.855   100 a  
#>         h_d.b(0, 1, foo) 355.084 381.0385 467.3812 437.5135 516.8630 2056.972   100   c
#>   h_alistaire(0, 1, foo) 148.735 165.1360 194.7361 189.9140 216.7810  287.990   100  b

On bigger data, difference become more stark, though. The original threatened to crash my laptop, but here are benchmarks for the fastest two:

# on 1k groups, 40k rows
microbenchmark::microbenchmark(
  h3_AEBilgrau(0, 1, foo2),
  h_alistaire(0, 1, foo2)
)
#> Unit: milliseconds
#>                     expr       min        lq      mean    median        uq      max neval cld
#> h3_AEBilgrau(0, 1, foo2) 336.98199 403.04104 412.06778 410.52391 423.33008 443.8286   100   b
#>  h_alistaire(0, 1, foo2)  14.00472  16.25852  18.07865  17.22296  18.09425  96.9157   100  a

Another possibility is to use a data.frame to summarize by group, then sum the appropriate column. In base R you'd do this with aggregate, but dplyr and and data.table are popular for making such an approach simpler with more complicated aggregations.

aggregate is slower than tapply. dplyr is faster than aggregate, but still slower. data.table, which is designed for speed, is almost exactly as fast as tapply.

library(dplyr)
library(data.table)

h_aggregate <- function(a, b, foo){sum(aggregate(x ~ id, foo, function(x){sum(tcrossprod(a - x, b - x))})$x)}
tidy_h <- function(a, b, foo){foo %>% group_by(id) %>% summarise(x = sum(tcrossprod(a - x, b - x))) %>% select(x) %>% sum()}
h_dt <- function(a, b, foo){setDT(foo)[, .(x = sum(tcrossprod(a - x, b - x))), by = id][, sum(x)]}

microbenchmark::microbenchmark(
  h_alistaire(1, 0, foo2), 
  h_aggregate(1, 0, foo2),
  tidy_h(1, 0, foo2), 
  h_dt(1, 0, foo2)
)
#> Unit: milliseconds
#>                     expr      min       lq      mean   median        uq       max neval cld
#> h_alistaire(1, 0, foo2) 13.30518 15.52003  18.64940 16.48818  18.13686  62.35675   100 a 
#> h_aggregate(1, 0, foo2) 93.08401 96.61465 107.14391 99.16724 107.51852 143.16473   100   c
#>      tidy_h(1, 0, foo2) 39.47244 42.22901  45.05550 43.94508  45.90303  90.91765   100  b 
#>        h_dt(1, 0, foo2) 13.31817 15.09805  17.27085 16.46967  17.51346  56.34200   100 a
6

I played a round a bit. First, your implementation:

foo = data.frame(x = 1:9, id = c(1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3))

h <- function(a, b, foo){
  a.diff = a - foo$x
  b.diff = b - foo$x
  prod = a.diff%*%t(b.diff)
  id.indicator = as.matrix(ifelse(dist(foo$id, diag = T, upper = T),0,1)) + 
     diag(nrow(foo))
  return(sum(prod*id.indicator))
}

h(a = 1, b = 0, foo = foo)
#[1] 891

Next, I tried a variant using a proper sparse matrix implementation (via the Matrix package) and functions for the index matrix. I also use tcrossprod which I often find to be a bit faster than a %*% t(b).

library("Matrix")

h2 <- function(a, b, foo) {
  a.diff <- a - foo$x
  b.diff <- b - foo$x
  prod <- tcrossprod(a.diff, b.diff) # the same as a.diff%*%t(b.diff)
  id.indicator <- do.call(bdiag, lapply(table(foo$id), function(n) matrix(1,n,n)))
  return(sum(prod*id.indicator))
}

h2(a = 1, b = 0, foo = foo)
#[1] 891

Note that this function relies on foo$id being sorted.

Lastly, I tried avoid creating the full n by n matrix.

h3 <- function(a, b, foo) {
  a.diff <- a - foo$x
  b.diff <- b - foo$x
  ids <- unique(foo$id)
  res <- 0
  for (i in seq_along(ids)) {
    indx <- which(foo$id == ids[i])
    res <- res + sum(tcrossprod(a.diff[indx], b.diff[indx]))
  }
  return(res)
}

h3(a = 1, b = 0, foo = foo)
#[1] 891

Benchmarking on your example:

library("microbenchmark")
microbenchmark(h(a = 1, b = 0, foo = foo), 
               h2(a = 1, b = 0, foo = foo),
               h3(a = 1, b = 0, foo = foo))
# Unit: microseconds
#                        expr      min        lq      mean    median        uq       max neval
#  h(a = 1, b = 0, foo = foo)  248.569  261.9530  493.2326  279.3530  298.2825 21267.890   100
# h2(a = 1, b = 0, foo = foo) 4793.546 4893.3550 5244.7925 5051.2915 5386.2855  8375.607   100
# h3(a = 1, b = 0, foo = foo)  213.386  227.1535  243.1576  234.6105  248.3775   334.612   100

Now, in this example, the h3 is the fastest and h2 is really slow. But I guess that both will be faster for larger examples. Probably, h3 will still win for larger examples though. While there is plenty of room of more optimization, h3 should be faster and more memory efficient. So, I think you should go for a variant of h3 which does not create unnecessarily large matrices.

  • Where is tab coming from? – Raad Feb 27 '17 at 21:48
  • @NBATrends Oops, it should have been ids; a leftover from a prototype. – Anders Ellern Bilgrau Feb 27 '17 at 21:49
3
sum(sapply(split(foo, foo$id), function(d) sum(outer(a-d$x, b-d$x))))
#[1] 891

#TESTING
foo = data.frame(x = sample(1:9,10000,replace = TRUE),
                      id = sample(1:3, 10000, replace = TRUE))
system.time(sum(sapply(split(foo, foo$id), function(d) sum(outer(a-d$x, b-d$x)))))
#   user  system elapsed 
#   0.15    0.01    0.17 

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