0

I have the following code in C++:

inline void armMultiply(const float* __restrict__ src1,
                        const float* __restrict__ src2,
                        float* __restrict__ dst)
{
    __asm volatile(
                 "vld1.f32 {q0}, [%[src1]:128]!      \n\t"
                 :
                 :[dst] "r" (dst), [src1] "r" (src1), [src2] "r" (src2)
                 );
}

Why do I get the error vector register expected ?

2
  • 6
    Instead of using inline assembly, you should strongly consider using intrinsics instead such as •float32x2_t vld1_f32 (const float32_t *) . Inline assembly puts severe limitations on the ability of the C++ compiler to optimize. Feb 27 '17 at 21:17
  • yes but i would like to load 2 arrays of 4 floats each into q1 and q2 registers and then multiply, i cannot control the loading of the q1,2 in c, which causes extra load from memory when i call the vld1q twice
    – shd
    Feb 27 '17 at 21:39
1

You're getting this error because your inline assembly is for 32 bit arm, but you're compiling for 64 bit arm (with clang - with gcc you would have gotten a different error).

(Inline) assembly is different between 32 and 64 bit arm, so you need to guard it with e.g. #if defined(__ARM_NEON__) && !defined(__aarch64__), or if you want to have different assembly for both 64 and 32 bit: #ifdef __aarch64__ .. #elif defined(__ARM_NEON__), etc.

As others commented, unless you really need to manually handtune the produced assembly, intrinsics can be just as good (and in some cases, better than what you produce yourself). You can e.g. do the two vld1_f32 calls, one vmul_f32 and one vst1_f32 via intrinsics just fine.

EDIT:

The corresponding inline assembly line for loading into a SIMD register on 64 bit would be:

"ld1 {v0.4s}, [%[src1]], #16      \n\t"

To support both, your function could look like this instead:

inline void armMultiply(const float* __restrict__ src1,
                        const float* __restrict__ src2,
                        float* __restrict__ dst)
{
#ifdef __aarch64__
    __asm volatile(
                 "ld1 {v0.4s}, [%[src1]], #16      \n\t"
                 :
                 :[dst] "r" (dst), [src1] "r" (src1), [src2] "r" (src2)
                 );
#elif defined(__ARM_NEON__)
    __asm volatile(
                 "vld1.f32 {q0}, [%[src1]:128]!      \n\t"
                 :
                 :[dst] "r" (dst), [src1] "r" (src1), [src2] "r" (src2)
                 );
#else
#error this requires neon
#endif
}
1
  • how can i make it assembly for 64bit ?
    – shd
    Feb 28 '17 at 8:55
0

Assuming we're talking about GCC, the docs say that you should be using "w" ("Floating point or SIMD vector register") instead of "r" ("register operand is allowed provided that it is in a general register") as the constraint.

https://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc-6.3.0/gcc/Machine-Constraints.html#Machine-Constraints

https://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc-6.3.0/gcc/Simple-Constraints.html#Simple-Constraints

1
  • That would be the case if you are referring to a register that actually holds the float vector, but in this case, the dst/src1/src2 variables are plain pointer variables that are held in normal general-purpose registers.
    – mstorsjo
    Feb 28 '17 at 7:58

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