I have created a .Net Core Web API program. I want to add a single view to it. Under the same project I add a "Views" folder. In the HomeController, where I am routing all my API requests, I created the following:

[HttpGet("view")]
    public IActionResult Index()
    {
        return View();
    }

In my Views folder I created a folder "Home" and added "Index.cshtml" to it.

When I launch the API, and navigate to "../view" I get to the return View(); line, but then it returns a 500 Internal Server Error.

This is what I don't like about the "automagical" approach of MVC convention. I have no idea where to link a view to a controller if the convention didn't work.

Update, this probably should have been my first course of action. I added a new class to Controllers folder, and used the MVC Controller template in VS2015. I then added a view to match, and it still doesn't work automagically.

So for clarity, my project is: ASP.NET Core Web Application(.NET Core) with a Web API template. I have a "Jobs" controller class that was added at the start as 'Values' and I renamed. Then I added an MVC Controller Class named "HomeController" with the only method being "Index". I added a folder named "Views" and a subfolder named "Home", and added an MVC View Page named "Index.cshtml".

I tried to use "return View();" in the Index method, didn't work. I then tried to add [Route("Home/Index")] above the Index method. Either way, the URL will get me to my break point at "return View();" but it will never return the view.

  • 1
    The "automagical" approach is slightly more difficult to learn, but the gain is that you have much less code to maintain because the application is driven by conventions. I am not sure if this applies to .NET core for sure, but in prior versions, you would never return a View from a WebAPI controller - Views are strictly for MVC. WebAPI is expecting you to return some kind of data structure that will ultimately result in XML or JSON to the consuming application, not a View. – NightOwl888 Feb 27 '17 at 22:28
  • @NightOwl888 I understand, and I know I shouldn't have done it that way, if you read my update you'll see I added an MVC controller and it still isn't working. – Steve Eggering Feb 28 '17 at 14:39
  • Can you show the content of your index.cshtml ? – AdrienTorris Feb 28 '17 at 14:54
  • See my answer, don't forget the [Route("")] on the controller – AdrienTorris Feb 28 '17 at 15:02
  • You should implement exception logging to know which exceptions occured on your application ;) – AdrienTorris Feb 28 '17 at 15:07

Note : It's a little strange that you want to return a view in a Web API project, a Web API project is supposed to return some data structure, like json using return new JsonResult(your_json_here) for example.

Note 2 : you need the Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc framework (which is installed with the Web API template)

Anyway, you have different ways to configure routing in a asp.net core application :

  • Creating and extending default routes

Example of routing configuration in the Configure method :

app.UseMvc(routes =>
{
           // You can add all the routes you need here

           // And the default route :
           routes.MapRoute(
                name: "default_route",
                template: "{controller}/{action}/{id?}",
                defaults: new { controller = "Home", action = "Index" }
           );
});
  • Using attributes

If you configure routing with attributes, don't forget the controller's one :

Example for the route /index :

[Route("")]
public class HomeController : Controller
{
     [HttpGet]
     [Route("[action]")]
     public IActionResult Index()
     {
        return View();
     }
}

Example for the route /home/index :

[Route("[controller]")]
public class HomeController : Controller
{
     [HttpGet]
     [Route("[action]")]
     public IActionResult Index()
     {
        return View();
     }
}

Example for the route /iputwhatiwant/actionnameiwant :

[Route("iputwhatiwant")]
public class HomeController : Controller
{
     [HttpGet]
     [Route("actionnameiwant")]
     public IActionResult Index()
     {
        return View();
     }
}

My screen of a .NET Core Web API project returning a view : My screen of a .NET Core Web API project returning a view

For more information, the official documentation is well-documented : https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/core/fundamentals/routing

  • I'm really just looking to add a home page that lists all the API's that I have. I'm not actually trying to have it be a full MVC webpage. I guess I have only ever deployed and MVC page, so I don't know how else to set a default html home page in this API program. I was trying to use the "Route" knowledge I have from API's and the convention of named controllers/views to make this work. Either way, I have no issue getting to my Return View() statement. It just wont actually serve that view. I have added the Use.Mvc(routes => to my startup file. But that didn't fix the issue. – Steve Eggering Mar 2 '17 at 23:52

How are you running this webapp, from the Windows commandline?... can you give us the detailed HTTP500 error. It will probably reveal something different than routing errors because that usually gives 404.

[Route("[controller]")]
public class HomeController : Controller

Note the automagical "[controller]" in the Route definition, I think its necessary now

It took me a frustratingly long while to learn the routing convention as it was being developed, but it seems to have normalized out for a few versions. Check out this tutorial documentation on the subject in MVC: Attribute Routing in ASP.NET MVC 5, which is MVC not WebCoreAPI where it is likely based from. If you have a better documentation specific to Web Core API, use that.

This ASP.NET Web Core Build a web API tutorial documentation has some good points about what you seem to be trying to do. Specifically, the section title "Getting to-do items" has this code:

[HttpGet("{id}", Name = "GetTodo")]
public IActionResult GetById(long id)
{
    var item = _todoRepository.Find(id);
    if (item == null)
    {
        return NotFound();
    }
    return new ObjectResult(item);
}

Looking at that with benefit of some measure of MVC routing experience, it looks particularly different from your approach in that the HTTP verb annotation member property value used is a query parameter.

Seeing I am guessing using known inexpertise, still, I think you need to get the attribute routing fixed, and maybe return an ObjectResult instead of a view, as NightOwl888 suggests. The server error might also have much more useful information along with the exception message.

EDIT: Sorry, I may have misunderstood your question. If you are trying to build an app that serves dynamic web pages instead of a WebAPI that serves data object results, this Build an MVC Web App tutorial, similar to the "Build a web API" tutorial I mentioned before might have your app structure problem answer. If you are trying to do both, you should probably start with the MVC Web App structure or use two separate projects.

The (only) way I have got this working is to declare the path as an attribute on the action - in the same way you have done but with the format as below (Controller/Action):

[HttpGet("Home/Index")]
public IActionResult Index()
{
    return View();
}
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I was missing:

"preserveCompilationContext": true

in the build options of my project.json

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