I have a page with 5 panels on it. When each panel comes into view I want 2 of it's child elements to decrease in size dependant on the users scroll amount.

I have written a function that manages to shrink the DIV somewhat but It occurs on all of them and not when each element comes into view, does this make sense?

https://jsfiddle.net/n7vmaz9s/

$(window).scroll(function () {
  var scrollTop = $(window).scrollTop();
  if (scrollTop < 200) {
    newWidth = 15;
  } else if (scrollTop > 400) {
    newWidth = 7.5;
  } else {
    newWidth = 15 - 7.5 * ((scrollTop - 200)) / 200;
  }
  $('.before').css({
    'width': newWidth + "%"
  });
  $('.after').css({
    'width': newWidth + "%"
  });
})

How can I get each 'before' and 'after' div to work when that elements parent comes into view?


I've also tried using .each as so...

$(window).scroll(function () {
  $(".service-image").each(function(){
      elementOffset = $(this).offset().top
    var scrollTop = $(window).scrollTop();
    elemDist = elementOffset - scrollTop;
      console.log(elementOffset - scrollTop);
      if (elemDist < 0) {
          newWidth = 15;
      } else if (elemDist > 400) {
          newWidth = 7.5;
      } else {
          newWidth = 15 - 7.5 * ((scrollTop - 200)) / 200;
      }
      $('.before').css({
          'width': newWidth + "%"
      });
       $('.after').css({
          'width': newWidth + "%"
      });
    });
})
  • 1
    Huh? Your title does not make sense. Run a function not once? – Heretic Monkey Feb 27 '17 at 22:55

Not sure if I fully understand the desired effect. But I wrote a fiddle that imitates the way each panel animates, but for individual panels when they are "in view": https://jsfiddle.net/zd0p8jfu/

$(window).scroll(function () {
    var scrollTop = $(window).scrollTop();
    $(".service-image").each(function(){
        var relativeScroll = scrollTop - $(this).offset().top;
      if (scrollTop < $(this).offset().top + 200) {
          newWidth = 15;
      } else if (scrollTop > $(this).offset().top + 400) {
          newWidth = 7.5;
      } else {
          newWidth = 15 - 7.5 * ((relativeScroll - 200)) / 200;
      }
      $(this).find('.before').css({
          'width': newWidth + "%"
      });
       $(this).find('.after').css({
          'width': newWidth + "%"
      });
    });
});

To reverse the direction you just need to swap the maths like so:

$(window).scroll(function () {
    var scrollTop = $(window).scrollTop();
    $(".service-image").each(function(){
        var relativeScroll = scrollTop - $(this).offset().top;
      if (scrollTop < $(this).offset().top + 200) {
          newWidth = 7.5;
      } else if (scrollTop > $(this).offset().top + 400) {
          newWidth = 15;
      } else {
          newWidth = 7.5 * ((relativeScroll - 200) / 200) + 7.5;
      }
      $(this).find('.before').css({
          'width': newWidth + "%"
      });
       $(this).find('.after').css({
          'width': newWidth + "%"
      });
    });
});
  • Ahh that's working better @andrewleedham! I don't understand what's different from what I wrote in regards to the each however? Is it possible to have a max width of 15% and it scales down to 7.5% or is it a lot of 'window' .height tinkering? – Liam Feb 27 '17 at 22:56
  • $('.before') and $('.after') will reference all the elements, putting them inside an each function doesn't change that. So you need to use the find function to get the relevant elements. Also you need to calculate the newWidth with a relative scroll to each parent hence the relativeScroll variable. With regards to your second question, do you mean reverse it? So it goes from large to small rather than small to large? – Andrew Leedham Feb 27 '17 at 23:01
  • I basically want it to start at 15% width and as the element comes into view it shrinks to 7.5% but doesnt go beyond either of these width's @andrewleedham – Liam Feb 27 '17 at 23:08
  • I've edited the original answer, with a solution to that. – Andrew Leedham Feb 27 '17 at 23:15
  • Thanks @andrewleedham, it still doesn't seem to work within those constrained widths? – Liam Feb 28 '17 at 22:07

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