54

I want to prevent users submitting forms multiple times in .NET MVC. I've tried several methods using Javascript but have had difficulties getting it to work in all browsers. So, how can I prevent this in my controller? It there some way that multiple submissions can be detected?

13 Answers 13

3

Dont reinvent the wheel :)

Use the Post/Redirect/Get design pattern.

Here you can find a question and an answer giving some suggestions on how to implement it in ASP.NET MVC.

  • 51
    the PRG pattern is indeed very good and I would also recommend it but I don't see how it could solve the issue. Let's take for example a slow POST action which processes a payment. The user clicks on the submit button and it might take some time before his request is processed and he is redirected to the success page. He might wonder what's going on and whether he clicked on the submit button. So he clicks it a second time which leads to a second HTTP request being sent to the server with the same data and without knowing it he orders the product twice. – Darin Dimitrov Nov 23 '10 at 7:04
  • 7
    According to the linked Wikipedia article the PRG pattern can't prevent duplicate form submission "if a web user clicks a submission button multiple times before the server response loads" – Phil Hale Nov 23 '10 at 9:10
  • @Darin: you're right but that problem could be easily solved by disabling the button after the click which, in any case, is only going to protect you in that specific moment. Please read more in my next comment @Phil Hale – Lorenzo Nov 23 '10 at 10:35
  • 2
    @Phil Hale: yes. and then it continues saying (may be prevented by using JavaScript to disable the button after the first click). You can't simply protect yourself from all the cases that can cause a double submission using only one method. The PRG pattern does give you an experienced way to protect from most of the pitfalls. Adding a javascript is only going to protect you in that specific moment – Lorenzo Nov 23 '10 at 10:36
  • 2
    Not sure why it is marked as an answer if it needs to use javascript – Alberto Montellano Jul 14 '14 at 22:10
61

First, make sure you're using the AntiForgeryToken on your form.

Then you can make a custom ActionFilter:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class | AttributeTargets.Method, AllowMultiple = false, Inherited = true)]
public class PreventDuplicateRequestAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute {
    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext) {
        if (HttpContext.Current.Request["__RequestVerificationToken"] == null)
            return;

        var currentToken = HttpContext.Current.Request["__RequestVerificationToken"].ToString();

        if (HttpContext.Current.Session["LastProcessedToken"] == null) {
            HttpContext.Current.Session["LastProcessedToken"] = currentToken;
            return;
        }

        lock (HttpContext.Current.Session["LastProcessedToken"]) {
            var lastToken = HttpContext.Current.Session["LastProcessedToken"].ToString();

            if (lastToken == currentToken) {
                filterContext.Controller.ViewData.ModelState.AddModelError("", "Looks like you accidentally tried to double post.");
                return;
            }

            HttpContext.Current.Session["LastProcessedToken"] = currentToken;
        }
    }
}

And on your controller action you just...

[HttpPost]
[ValidateAntiForgeryToken]
[PreventDuplicateRequest]
public ActionResult CreatePost(InputModel input) {
   ...
}

You'll notice this doesn't prevent the request altogether. Instead it returns an error in the modelstate, so when your action checks if ModelState.IsValid then it will see that it is not, and will return with your normal error handling.


UPDATE: Here's an ASP.NET Core MVC solution

I'm going to stick to the least-impact use case like before, where you're only adorning those controller actions that you specifically want to prevent duplicate requests on. If you want to have this filter run on every request, or want to use async, there are other options. See this article for more details.

The new form tag helper now automatically includes the AntiForgeryToken so you no longer need to manually add that to your view.

Create a new ActionFilterAttribute like this example. You can do many additional things with this, for example including a time delay check to make sure that even if the user presents two different tokens, they aren't submitting multiple times per minute.

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class | AttributeTargets.Method, AllowMultiple = false, Inherited = true)]
public class PreventDuplicateRequestAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute {
    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext context) {
        if (context.HttpContext.Request.Form.ContainsKey("__RequestVerificationToken")) {
            var currentToken = context.HttpContext.Request.Form["__RequestVerificationToken"].ToString();
            var lastToken = context.HttpContext.Session.GetString("LastProcessedToken");

            if (lastToken == currentToken) {
                context.ModelState.AddModelError(string.Empty, "Looks like you accidentally submitted the same form twice.");
            }
            else {
                context.HttpContext.Session.SetString("LastProcessedToken", currentToken);
            }
        }
    }
}

By request, I also wrote an asynchronous version which can be found here.

Here's a contrived usage example of the custom PreventDuplicateRequest attribute.

[HttpPost]
[ValidateAntiForgeryToken]
[PreventDuplicateRequest]
public IActionResult Create(InputModel input) {
    if (ModelState.IsValid) {
        // ... do something with input

        return RedirectToAction(nameof(SomeAction));
    }

    // ... repopulate bad input model data into a fresh viewmodel

    return View(viewModel);
}

A note on testing: simply hitting back in a browser does not use the same AntiForgeryToken. On faster computers where you can't physically double click the button twice, you'll need to use a tool like Fiddler to replay your request with the same token multiple times.

A note on setup: Core MVC does not have sessions enabled by default. You'll need to add the Microsoft.AspNet.Session package to your project, and configure your Startup.cs properly. Please read this article for more details.

Short version of Session setup is: In Startup.ConfigureServices() you need to add:

services.AddDistributedMemoryCache();
services.AddSession();

In Startup.Configure() you need to add (before app.UseMvc() !!):

app.UseSession();
  • 9
    This is the best answer to this question in my opinion. When, for whatever reason, client-side prevention of double-submission won't work, this provides a neat way of catching it on the server-side. Kudos for the use of an action attribute and repurposing the anti-forgery helper to provide a one-time token, it makes it really easy to apply this. – ngm May 9 '16 at 9:11
  • 1
    @InkHeart LB? Load balancing? – nmit026 Oct 4 '16 at 0:24
  • 2
    @JimYarbro Even though your solution works great and prevent duplicate submission but there is still a problem I can see. Let's assume, I was updating the user profile, when the first request made all changes made in the database but just before it completes (redirect to another page, in my case), second request has been made and eventually user will see the error message about the duplicate submission but he will never know his profile has been updated when he made first request? Is it possible to notify user about the changes there were made during first request? – Ammar Khan Dec 2 '16 at 12:06
  • 2
    This is a good solution that effectivelly prevents the multiple form submission problem. How can this not be the accepted answer surpasses me. – Nmaster88 Jun 10 '17 at 21:19
  • 3
    Just going to add to this awesome answer. An above comment asked how to deal with letting the user know that the first post was successful. I changed the Attribute to add the error to the ModelState with key "DuplicatePost". Then in my PostAction (protected by PreventDuplicateRequest) I put: if(ModelState.ContainsKey("DuplicatePost") return new EmptyResult(); This forces the server to not return any page for the subsequent posts and it only returns your normal processing from the first! – Red Nightingale Sep 4 '18 at 1:52
37

I've tried several methods using Javascript but have had difficulties getting it to work in all browsers

Have you tried using jquery?

$('#myform').submit(function() {
    $(this).find(':submit').attr('disabled', 'disabled');
});

This should take care of the browser differences.

  • Yeah I've tried that particular solution and it doesn't work in some versions of IE, which is why I'm trying to find a non Javascript solution – Phil Hale Nov 22 '10 at 22:18
  • Apologies, that solution does work! I failed to notice that your answer was slightly different to the one I had used previously and it does work in all browser versions I tested – Phil Hale Nov 22 '10 at 23:23
  • 4
    you could mark as answer, so I would have read this before the other one ;) – VinnyG Mar 23 '11 at 20:10
  • 2
    While it's preventing a second click, it's also eating the click event so my form submit no longer works :( – SteveCav Jul 24 '13 at 4:01
  • 4
    I found it necessary to check if $("form").valid() otherwise it would be stuck on disable when there was validation errors – John Nov 26 '13 at 7:26
30

Just to complete the answer of @Darin, if you want to handle the client validation (if the form has required fields), you can check if there's input validation error before disabling the submit button :

$('#myform').submit(function () {
    if ($(this).find('.input-validation-error').length == 0) {
        $(this).find(':submit').attr('disabled', 'disabled');
    }
});
  • 10
    Thanks, FYI: this solution also worked with unobtrusive validation (including server side). I tried to rapid-click the upvote button to give you more points, but StackOverflow blocked multiple submits... :-) – Robert Corvus Feb 6 '12 at 17:33
  • 1
    what if we use $(this).valid()<br/> $('form').submit(function () { ('.input-validation-error').length); if ($(this).valid()) { $(this).find(':submit').attr('disabled', 'disabled'); } }); – aamir sajjad Jul 28 '14 at 16:56
  • Great improvement... another note in case people have multiple submit buttons with different values (save/delete), that disabled controls do not submit their values. To rectify, you could either a) save value as a hidden input or b) mimic disabled attribute with CSS to grey out and JS to prevent clicks – KyleMit Sep 19 '17 at 13:11
10

what if we use $(this).valid()

 $('form').submit(function () {
            if ($(this).valid()) {
                $(this).find(':submit').attr('disabled', 'disabled');
            }
        });
  • 1
    I found this is the right way. Using "($(this).find('.input-validation-error').length == 0)" from another answer doesn't work for me. That option disables the submit button even when there are validation errors. It could be because "($(this).find('.input-validation-error').length == 0)" is being called before the validation occurs. – user3885927 May 31 '16 at 19:16
  • Anyone use this and find any scenarios where this didn't work for them? – Ciaran Gallagher Jul 25 '19 at 9:13
  • The :submit pseudo element selector didn't work for me with a <button type="submit"> so I ended up using "button[type=submit]" instead. I'm not sure where the pseudo element selector would work because I don't see it in documentation anywhere. – carlin.scott Nov 26 '19 at 23:34
2

You could include a hidden (random or counter) value in the form post, a controller could track these values in an 'open' list or something similar; every time your controller hands out a form it embeds a value, which it tracks allowing one post use of it.

0

In its self, no, however depending on what the controller is actually doing, you should be able to work out a way.

Is a record being created in the database that you can check for to see if they've already submitted the form?

  • I think that would be possible, but I was hoping to find a different method – Phil Hale Nov 22 '10 at 22:27
0

You can also pass some sort of token in a hidden field and validate this in the controller.

Or you work with redirects after submitting values. But this get's difficult if you take heavily advantage of ajax.

0

You can do this by creating some sort of static entry flag that is user specific, or specific to whatever way you want to protect the resource. I use a ConcurrentDictionary to track entrance. The key is basically the name of the resource I'm protecting combined with the User ID. The trick is figuring out how to block the request when you know it's currently processing.

public async Task<ActionResult> SlowAction()
{
    if(!CanEnterResource(nameof(SlowAction)) return new HttpStatusCodeResult(204);
    try
    {
        // Do slow process
        return new SlowProcessActionResult();
    }
    finally
    {
       ExitedResource(nameof(SlowAction));
    }
}

Returning a 204 is a response to the double-click request that will do nothing on the browser side. When the slow process is done, the browser will receive the correct response for the original request and act accordingly.

0

Use this simple jquery input field and will work awesomely even if you have multipple submit buttons in a single form.

$('input[type=submit]').click(function () {
    var clickedBtn = $(this)
    setTimeout(function () {
        clickedBtn.attr('disabled', 'disabled');
    }, 1);
});
0

Just add this code at the end of your page. I am using "jquery-3.3.1.min.js" and "bootstrap 4.3.1"

<script type="text/javascript">
    $('form').submit(function () {
        if ($(this).valid()) {
            $(this).find(':submit').attr('disabled', 'disabled');
        }
    });
</script>
-1

This works on every browser

 document.onkeydown = function () {
        switch (event.keyCode) {
            case 116: //F5 button
                event.returnValue = false;
                event.keyCode = 0;
                return false;
            case 82: //R button
                if (event.ctrlKey) {
                    event.returnValue = false;
                    event.keyCode = 0;
                    return false;
                }
        }
    }
  • This uses javascript. The OP is looking for a no javascript solution. – Ben Bartle Oct 29 '14 at 6:31
  • 1
    Won't work when a mobile device auto-reloads the page. – GlennG Jan 19 '17 at 12:03
-1

Use the Post/Redirect/Get design pattern.

PS: It looks to me that the answer by Jim Yarbro could have a fundamental flaw in that the __RequestVerificationToken is stored in the HttpContext.Current.Session["LastProcessedToken"], this value will be replaced when a second form is submitted (from say another browser window), at this point it is possible to re-submit the first form and it won’t be recognized as a duplicate submission? For the proposed model to work wouldn’t a history of __RequestVerificationToken be required(?), this wouldn’t be feasible.

  • 1
    Mark, please post this as a new question instead of writing it in this answer section. In that new question, you may link to this original question. – Rosdi Kasim Jan 20 '19 at 9:11

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