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I'm working on a project to set up a cloud architecture using docker-swarm. I know that with swarm I could deploy replicas of a service which means multiple containers of that image will be running to serve requests.

I also read that docker has an internal load balancer that manages this request distribution.

However, I need help in understanding the following:

Say I have a container that exposes a service as a REST API or say its a web app. And If I have multiple containers (replicas) deployed in the swarm and I have other containers (running some apps) that talk to this HTTP/REST service.

Then, when I write those apps which IP:PORT combination do I use? Is it any of the worker node IP's running these services? Will doing so take care of distributing the load appropriately even amongst other workers/manager running the same service?

Or should I call the manager which in turn takes care of routing appropriately (even if the manager node does not have a container running this specific service)?

Thanks.

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when I write those apps which IP:PORT combination do I use? Is it any of the worker node IP's running these services?

You can use any node that is participating in the swarm, even if there is no replica of the service in question exists on that node. So you will use Node:HostPort combination. The ingress routing mesh will route the request to an active container.

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Will doing so take care of distributing the load appropriately even amongst other workers/manager running the same service?

The ingress controller will do round robin by default.

Now The clients should use dns round robin to access the service on the docker swarm nodes. The classic DNS cache problem will occur. To avoid that we can use external load balancer like HAproxy.

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    Are you sure it always does round-robin? Can you link to that fact? It strikes me as an odd design choice. Could generate a lot of needless network traffic, e.g. if one container needs the service of another, and there's a replica on the same host - that replica should be given priority, to avoid needless network traffic. Feb 28 '17 at 15:44
  • @farhad: Thank You. I see that the load-balancing mess works between the nodes in the swarm. But let's say I have isolated containers to different overlay networks set across nodes. Does the load balancing still happen? Ex: Node++ --> Container(A)_1, Container(A)_2, ContainerB(1) Node** --> Container(C)_1, Container(D)_1, Container(E)_1 Both services of type Container(A) are connected to three different overlay-network each of which only has C, D & E that run on Node**. So when C,D or E tries to access containers of type A over their own overlay network will it be handled?
    – Shabirmean
    Feb 28 '17 at 15:52
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    @AssafLavie Container to container traffic uses dns. Swarm internal DNS will return all active container records matching the service name in roundrobin order. Kubernetes handle this issue via pod concept. Feb 28 '17 at 16:18
  • @Shabirmean When C,D,E try to access container A, they will query service A from dns, and DNS is based on the network they joined. In this Case the returned IP will be in overlay 1. Feb 28 '17 at 16:21
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    @NeilS Its not over ingress, its over DNS roundrobin! because clients may connect to the failed docker host, they have to retry another dns entry, but with HAproxy high availabled via VRRP (keepalived) there is no delay in case of failed host. May 1 '17 at 14:31
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An important additional information to the existing answer

The advantage of using a proxy (HAProxy) in-front of docker swarm is, swarm nodes can reside on a private network that is accessible to the proxy server, but that is not publicly accessible. This will make your cluster secure.

If you are using AWS VPC, you can create a private subnet and place your swarm nodes inside the private subnet and place the proxy server in public subnet which can forward the traffic to the swarm nodes.

When you access the HAProxy load balancer, it forwards requests to nodes in the swarm. The swarm routing mesh routes the request to an active task. If, for any reason the swarm scheduler dispatches tasks to different nodes, you don’t need to reconfigure the load balancer.

For more details please read https://docs.docker.com/engine/swarm/ingress/

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