9

I am running one stored procedure asynchronously (I need to run the same SP around 150 times) like this:-

var queryTask = new List<Task>();
for (int i = 0; i < 150; i++)
{
      queryTask.Add(da.ExecuteSPAsync("Async" + i.ToString()));
}
Task.WhenAll(queryTask).Wait();

Now, it will create 150 Tasks and execute them. Can I split these tasks in batches and run them? Will that decrease the load on SQL server side?

Or shall I consider TPL to run it? Like this:-

Parallel.For(0, 150, new ParallelOptions { MaxDegreeOfParallelism = 5 },
              x => da.ExecuteSP("PPWith5Threads" + x.ToString()));

Which one is better in terms of performance? This is just an example for demonstation purpose, in actual I am having a collection of custom type on which I need to execute some SP.

15
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    if you want to batch up async tasks, you want to implement a semaphore, and each thread should wait on that semaphore. This won't exactly batch, but will prevent all 150 tasks firing off in one go. IMHO better than batching Feb 28, 2017 at 14:18
  • @CallumLinington Can't that be achieved simply with MaxDegreeOfParallelism on the Parallel.For? That'll limit the concurrent tasks to 5 in this case. Feb 28, 2017 at 14:36
  • @AdamHouldsworth you can do, I think you get more flexibility around using semaphores. Feb 28, 2017 at 14:40
  • 1
    If you could effectively run 8 things at once, why would you want to batch? I assume each process you want to run finishes in a different amount of time, running them in batch means that each batch will be only running one process for some amount of time instead of 8. Why not just figure out how many tasks you can run a once, effectively, and keep running that many until they're all done? Feb 28, 2017 at 14:50
  • 1
    @AdamHouldsworth It absolutely does imply a lot about the internal implementation. It means it can only ever accept synchronous operations, not asynchronous operations, and that it doesn't have enough information to even potentially deal with asynchronous operations. It simply doesn't have the tools to do it, even if it tried to. Since it can only accept synchronous operations, the only way it has to run them in parallel is to use multiple threads, and that's only the appropriate thing to do if the operations you're trying to parallelize are CPU bound operations.
    – Servy
    Feb 28, 2017 at 14:55

1 Answer 1

10

So you can use a Semaphore for this. The concept behind a semaphore is the night club bouncer scenario, where the bouncer has a limit to the amount of people (threads) allowed in the club (thread pool) and as people leave (threads finish) other people can enter (threads can continue), up to the limit.

All threads will be started, however it is the WaitAsync() which is blocking the thread from continuing. The Release() is signalling a thread re-entering the thread pool.

The delay here gives the effect of batching because each thread is roughly waiting the same amount of time, however, in reality it will be more likely that you'll see a few at a time.

Substitute Delay(5000) with random int to get a better look.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var runner = new SprocRunner(new DataAccess());

        var threads = new List<Task>();
        for (var i = 0; i < 150; i++)
        {
            threads.Add(runner.ExecuteSp($"Async {i}"));
        }

        Task.WaitAll(threads.ToArray());
    }
}

public class SprocRunner
{
    private readonly System.Threading.SemaphoreSlim batcher = new System.Threading.SemaphoreSlim(10, 10);
    private readonly DataAccess da;

    public SprocRunner(DataAccess da)
    {
        this.da = da;
    }

    public async Task ExecuteSp(string asyncTaskName)
    {
        await batcher.WaitAsync();

        try
        {
            await this.da.ExecuteSP(asyncTaskName);
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
        }
        finally
        {
            batcher.Release();
        }
    }
}

public class DataAccess
{
    public Task ExecuteSP(string name)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(name);

        return Task.Delay(5000);
    }
}

Why not to use Parallel

After reading papers from the likes of Stephen Toub, the case is, if you are doing lots of I/O bound tasks then in some cases using Parallel isn't a problem and it does allow you to get the job done. The things to consider is that thread creation isn't a non-negligible cost, and if you request more threads than are present in the ThreadPool it will have to inject new ones. This becomes a problem if you're in an environment which makes lots of use of threads like ASP.NET. Having tonnes of threads sitting around blocking on I/O work is really really bad and can bring your server to a stand still.

This is where using the Task abstraction really comes into its own, because you can run all these tasks and have then wait for the I/O response - but really importantly - they won't block any threads (other than the main thread waiting on the results), only once the I/O completes will treads be utilised briefly to process the results.

5
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    It would be better to use SemaphoreSlim and WaitAsync. Feb 28, 2017 at 14:43
  • You also shouldn't have a static semaphore; it should be an instance field.
    – Servy
    Feb 28, 2017 at 14:45
  • Thanks @StephenCleary will update. I last used this in a .NET 4 program Feb 28, 2017 at 14:45
  • @CallumLinington - Thanks, I am testing this but it is taking lot of time. Sorry I don't have much knowledge on Parallel programming. Can you explain how is it different from Parallel.For with _MaxDegreeOfParallelism _ set as 5? Feb 28, 2017 at 15:06
  • Parallel.For is for parallelism where as Task is being used for concurrency. Parallel.For is a construct for defining an action that should be run in parallel, where as Task is just a high level abstraction over the asynchronous concurrency pattern. Both are "safe" to use due to the fact they both use the Thread Pool to manage threads, however read this to understand the dangers of parallelism Feb 28, 2017 at 16:24

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