3

I am currently working on an API where a record should only be allowed to be pulled once. It's basically a queue where once a client pulls the record, the Retrieved field on the record is marked true. The Get calls only pull records where the Retrieved field is false.

Controller:

    [HttpGet]
    public virtual IActionResult GetAll([FromQuery] int? limit)
    {
        try
        {
            return Ok(_repository.Get(limit));
        }
        catch
        {
            return new StatusCodeResult(StatusCodes.Status500InternalServerError);
        }
    }

Repository:

    public IQueryable<Report> Get(int? limit)
    {
        IQueryable<Report> reports;

        if (limit == null)
        {
            reports = _context.Reports.Where(r => r.Retrieved == false);
        }
        else
        {
            reports = _context.Reports.Where(r => r.Retrieved == false).Take((int)limit);
        }

        return reports;
    }

What would be the best way to modify the records that have been pulled by the Get call? If I do the modification before returning results from the repository code, then when the controller actually converts the IQueryable to real data, the field has changed and it won't pull any results, but the Controller seems like the wrong place to be doing this sort of modification to the database.

3

I would split this functionality away from the retrieval. Let the caller/client indicate that the report has been successfully retrieved and read with a second call. It is a little more overhead but it adds resilience. Example: if there is a failure in the retrieval after the server call (maybe in the network on browser or client app) then the client has another opportunity to retrieve the data.

Controller:

[HttpPut] 
public virtual async Task<IActionResult> MarkAsRetrieved(IEnumerable<int> reportIds, CancellationToken token)
{
    await _repository.MarkRetrievedAsync(reportIds, token).ConfigureAwait(true);
    return Ok();
}

Repository:

public Task MarkRetrievedAsync([FromBody]IEnumerable<int> reportIds, CancellationToken token)
{
    foreach (Report report in reportIds.Select(x => new Report{ReportId = x, Retrieved = false}))
    {
        _context.Reports.Attach(report);
        report.Retrieved = true;
    }
    return _context.SaveChangesAsync(token);
}

Notes

  • It is only necessary to send over the identifier for a Report instance. You can then attach an empty instance with that same identifier and update the Retrieved property to true, just that will be sent in the corresponding store update statement.
9
  • I like this strategy, but when I try this, I get an error that the report is already attached on the _context.Reports.Attach(report) line.
    – KevenDenen
    Mar 1 '17 at 19:09
  • @KevenDenen - also an option, the downside to that is that you are retrieving the reports only to then update them again, its basically a double step where the retrieval is actually not necessary. If the type Report is light weight its not a big deal, if it has big columns like large strings then its a lot of overhead.
    – Igor
    Mar 1 '17 at 19:25
  • @KevenDenen - the only reason I could see that happening is: 1) there is a double id passed through, you could filter that out with reportIds.Distinct().Select(.... 2) Your context is stale or is the same context instance on which the retrieval was called.
    – Igor
    Mar 1 '17 at 19:26
  • It was the context that was the issue. I set up the context in the Startup.cs file as a service. I had just called an HttpGet to retrieve a list, so the context was already filled with the reports. If I restart the API and call the HttpPut without first calling HttpGet, there is no error with your code.
    – KevenDenen
    Mar 1 '17 at 19:35
  • 1
    The decoration for getting the data from the body of the call is [FromBody], ie public async virtual Task<IActionResult> MarkAsRetrieved([FromBody]int[] ids)
    – KevenDenen
    Mar 1 '17 at 19:46
0

I would changed the Retrieved bit in the database to a handle of some kind-- Guid or record id to another table that records the fetch, or some other unique value. Then I would determine the handle, update the records I am about to fetch with that that handle, then retrieve the records that match that handle. At any point if you fail, you can set the retrieved handle back to NULL for the handle value you started.

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