As the title says, I'm trying use an unordered_set containing objects of class Foo as a data member of class Foo. Is this possible in C++?

I have this code:

#include <unordered_set>
using namespace std;

struct FooHash;

class Foo {
public:
    int id;
    unordered_set<Foo, FooHash> foos; // error here
    bool operator==(const Foo& foo) {
        return id == foo.id;
    }
};

struct FooHash {
    size_t operator()(const Foo& foo) const {
        return foo.id;
    }
};

int main() {
    Foo f;
    unordered_set<Foo, FooHash> foos;
    return 0;
}

but it throws the following error:

In file included from /usr/include/c++/6.3.1/bits/hashtable.h:35:0,
                 from /usr/include/c++/6.3.1/unordered_set:47,
                 from main.cpp:1:
/usr/include/c++/6.3.1/bits/hashtable_policy.h: In instantiation of ‘struct std::__detail::__is_noexcept_hash<Foo, FooHash>’:
/usr/include/c++/6.3.1/type_traits:143:12:   required from ‘struct std::__and_<std::__is_fast_hash<FooHash>, std::__detail::__is_noexcept_hash<Foo, FooHash> >’
/usr/include/c++/6.3.1/type_traits:154:38:   required from ‘struct std::__not_<std::__and_<std::__is_fast_hash<FooHash>, std::__detail::__is_noexcept_hash<Foo, FooHash> > >’
/usr/include/c++/6.3.1/bits/unordered_set.h:95:63:   required from ‘class std::unordered_set<Foo, FooHash>’
main.cpp:9:33:   required from here
/usr/include/c++/6.3.1/bits/hashtable_policy.h:85:34: error: no match for call to ‘(const FooHash) (const Foo&)’
  noexcept(declval<const _Hash&>()(declval<const _Key&>()))>
           ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~^~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
In file included from /usr/include/c++/6.3.1/bits/move.h:57:0,
                 from /usr/include/c++/6.3.1/bits/stl_pair.h:59,
                 from /usr/include/c++/6.3.1/utility:70,
                 from /usr/include/c++/6.3.1/unordered_set:38,
                 from main.cpp:1:
/usr/include/c++/6.3.1/type_traits: In instantiation of ‘struct std::__not_<std::__and_<std::__is_fast_hash<FooHash>, std::__detail::__is_noexcept_hash<Foo, FooHash> > >’:
/usr/include/c++/6.3.1/bits/unordered_set.h:95:63:   required from ‘class std::unordered_set<Foo, FooHash>’
main.cpp:9:33:   required from here
/usr/include/c++/6.3.1/type_traits:154:38: error: ‘value’ is not a member of ‘std::__and_<std::__is_fast_hash<FooHash>, std::__detail::__is_noexcept_hash<Foo, FooHash> >’
     : public integral_constant<bool, !_Pp::value>

Forward declaring both classes and declaring the methods after gives these two errors:

In file included from /usr/include/c++/6.3.1/unordered_set:44:0,
                 from main.cpp:1:
/usr/include/c++/6.3.1/ext/aligned_buffer.h: In instantiation of ‘struct __gnu_cxx::__aligned_buffer<Foo>’:
/usr/include/c++/6.3.1/bits/hashtable_policy.h:246:43:   required from ‘struct std::__detail::_Hash_node_value_base<Foo>’
/usr/include/c++/6.3.1/bits/hashtable_policy.h:277:12:   required from ‘struct std::__detail::_Hash_node<Foo, true>’
/usr/include/c++/6.3.1/bits/hashtable_policy.h:1894:60:   required from ‘struct std::__detail::_Hashtable_alloc<std::allocator<std::__detail::_Hash_node<Foo, true> > >’
/usr/include/c++/6.3.1/bits/hashtable.h:170:11:   required from ‘class std::_Hashtable<Foo, Foo, std::allocator<Foo>, std::__detail::_Identity, std::equal_to<Foo>, FooHash, std::__detail::_Mod_range_hashing, std::__detail::_Default_ranged_hash, std::__detail::_Prime_rehash_policy, std::__detail::_Hashtable_traits<true, true, true> >’
/usr/include/c++/6.3.1/bits/unordered_set.h:96:18:   required from ‘class std::unordered_set<Foo, FooHash>’
main.cpp:12:37:   required from here
/usr/include/c++/6.3.1/ext/aligned_buffer.h:85:34: error: invalid application of ‘sizeof’ to incomplete type ‘Foo’
     : std::aligned_storage<sizeof(_Tp), std::alignment_of<_Tp>::value>
                                  ^
/usr/include/c++/6.3.1/ext/aligned_buffer.h:85:34: error: invalid application of ‘sizeof’ to incomplete type ‘Foo’
/usr/include/c++/6.3.1/ext/aligned_buffer.h: In instantiation of ‘void* __gnu_cxx::__aligned_buffer<_Tp>::_M_addr() [with _Tp = Foo]’:
/usr/include/c++/6.3.1/ext/aligned_buffer.h:110:41:   required from ‘_Tp* __gnu_cxx::__aligned_buffer<_Tp>::_M_ptr() [with _Tp = Foo]’
/usr/include/c++/6.3.1/bits/hashtable_policy.h:250:34:   required from ‘_Value* std::__detail::_Hash_node_value_base<_Value>::_M_valptr() [with _Value = Foo]’
/usr/include/c++/6.3.1/bits/hashtable_policy.h:1971:36:   required from ‘void std::__detail::_Hashtable_alloc<_NodeAlloc>::_M_deallocate_node(std::__detail::_Hashtable_alloc<_NodeAlloc>::__node_type*) [with _NodeAlloc = std::allocator<std::__detail::_Hash_node<Foo, true> >; std::__detail::_Hashtable_alloc<_NodeAlloc>::__node_type = std::__detail::_Hash_node<Foo, true>]’
/usr/include/c++/6.3.1/bits/hashtable_policy.h:1984:22:   required from ‘void std::__detail::_Hashtable_alloc<_NodeAlloc>::_M_deallocate_nodes(std::__detail::_Hashtable_alloc<_NodeAlloc>::__node_type*) [with _NodeAlloc = std::allocator<std::__detail::_Hash_node<Foo, true> >; std::__detail::_Hashtable_alloc<_NodeAlloc>::__node_type = std::__detail::_Hash_node<Foo, true>]’
/usr/include/c++/6.3.1/bits/hashtable.h:1901:7:   required from ‘void std::_Hashtable<_Key, _Value, _Alloc, _ExtractKey, _Equal, _H1, _H2, _Hash, _RehashPolicy, _Traits>::clear() [with _Key = Foo; _Value = Foo; _Alloc = std::allocator<Foo>; _ExtractKey = std::__detail::_Identity; _Equal = std::equal_to<Foo>; _H1 = FooHash; _H2 = std::__detail::_Mod_range_hashing; _Hash = std::__detail::_Default_ranged_hash; _RehashPolicy = std::__detail::_Prime_rehash_policy; _Traits = std::__detail::_Hashtable_traits<true, true, true>]’
/usr/include/c++/6.3.1/bits/hashtable.h:1227:12:   required from ‘std::_Hashtable<_Key, _Value, _Alloc, _ExtractKey, _Equal, _H1, _H2, _Hash, _RehashPolicy, _Traits>::~_Hashtable() [with _Key = Foo; _Value = Foo; _Alloc = std::allocator<Foo>; _ExtractKey = std::__detail::_Identity; _Equal = std::equal_to<Foo>; _H1 = FooHash; _H2 = std::__detail::_Mod_range_hashing; _Hash = std::__detail::_Default_ranged_hash; _RehashPolicy = std::__detail::_Prime_rehash_policy; _Traits = std::__detail::_Hashtable_traits<true, true, true>]’
/usr/include/c++/6.3.1/bits/unordered_set.h:126:7:   required from here
/usr/include/c++/6.3.1/ext/aligned_buffer.h:99:36: error: using invalid field ‘__gnu_cxx::__aligned_buffer<_Tp>::_M_storage’
         return static_cast<void*>(&_M_storage);

It seems containers of incomplete types aren't allowed in the standard. I want to try to use pointers, but operator== can't be overloaded for pointer operands. Any workarounds?

  • BTW, not sure it is not strictly UB to have unordered_set of not complete type. – Jarod42 Feb 28 '17 at 19:09
  • @FrançoisAndrieux Fixed, thanks. – devil0150 Feb 28 '17 at 19:09
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to fully define your classes before using them as a template argument for unordered_set. While Foo can't be fully defined during it's own definition, but it's pointer type is. You can replace Foo with unique_ptr<Foo> quite easily to work around the issue.

#include <memory>
#include <unordered_set>

// Forward declaration
class Foo;

// Declare classes
struct FooHash {
    size_t operator()(const std::unique_ptr<Foo>& foo) const;
};

class Foo {
public:
    int id;
    std::unordered_set<std::unique_ptr<Foo>, FooHash> foos;
};

// Method implementations
size_t FooHash::operator()(const std::unique_ptr<Foo>& foo) const {
    return foo->id;
}
  • I completely forgot I could do the method separately. Thanks. – devil0150 Feb 28 '17 at 19:00
  • This throws another error. I'll add it to the original post. – devil0150 Feb 28 '17 at 19:05
  • Containers of incomplete types are not supported by standard c++. – juanchopanza Feb 28 '17 at 19:06
  • @juanchopanza I see. I guess I'll use pointers. But operator== can't be overloaded for pointers. Do you know of any workaround for this? – devil0150 Feb 28 '17 at 19:26
  • @devil0150 It can be overloaded for unique_ptr. In any case, it's much easier to use a set of std::unique_ptr<Foo> rather than of Foo* for an owning container (which is your case). You'll have to always delete your pointers if you use Foo*. – François Andrieux Feb 28 '17 at 19:31

As François Andrieux already pointed out in his answer, an incomplete type cannot be used with std::unordered_set. He gave a possible solution using std::unique_ptr.

One disadvantage of using std::unique_ptrmay be that your class now requires explicit dynamic memory allocation to insert into Foo::foos. In my opinion this is an implementation detail that should be hidden.

Another (and possibly bigger) issue may be that you loose value semantics, because std::unique_ptr can only be moved, not copied. You would have to implement custom copy constructor and assignment operator to get value semantics back.

Using boost::recursive_wrapper, there is another solution possible that hides the pointer. Although boost::recursive_wrapper was invented for boost::variant, it can be used in other situations where incomplete types are not allowed.

With recursive_wrapper, the Foo class becomes:

class Foo {
public:
    using Wrapper = boost::recursive_wrapper<Foo>;

    Foo() = default;
    explicit Foo( int id ) : id( id ) {}

    struct Hash {
        size_t operator()(const Wrapper& foo) const { return foo.get().id; }
    };

    struct KeyEqual {
        bool operator()(const Wrapper& foo1, const Wrapper& foo2) const {
            return foo1.get().id == foo2.get().id; 
        }
    };

    using Set = std::unordered_set< Wrapper, Hash, KeyEqual >;
    Set foos;
    int id = 0;
};

I made another change by using the 3rd template parameter KeyEqual of std::unordered_set to define equality of the key independently from Foo::operator==. Now Foo::operator== could be implemented as it should be, by comparing all members of Foo, not just id. This is left as an exercise for the reader.

To insert and find items in Foo::foos, you can create instances of Foo regularly without having to use dynamic memory allocation. Behind the scenes, boost::recursive_wrapper will allocate memory dynamically though.

The only place where you will notice that a wrapper is used, will be when you access Foo through an iterator of Foo::Set because then you have to call boost::reference_wrapper::get(). That's not worse than using std::unique_ptr which requires use of double indirection (i. e. (*it)->id).

Example usage:

int main() {
    Foo f1;

    // No explicit dynamic memory allocation here! 
    f1.foos.insert( Foo( 1 ) );
    f1.foos.insert( Foo( 1 ) );
    f1.foos.insert( Foo( 2 ) );

    // Value semantics are kept.
    Foo f2 = f1;

    f2.foos.erase( Foo( 1 ) );

    std::cout << "f1.size: " << f1.foos.size() << std::endl;
    std::cout << "f2.size: " << f2.foos.size() << std::endl;

    // Find a Foo, still clean syntax.
    auto it = f1.foos.find( Foo( 2 ) );
    if( it != f1.foos.end() )
    {
        // Only when accessing Foo through the iterator we notice
        // the recursive_wrapper because we must call its get() method. 
        std::cout << "found a Foo with id: " << it->get().id << std::endl;
    }    
    return 0;
}

Full demo: http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/00d2a48106f2cc99

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