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I want to check the user input in a tablelist using a regex expression. Usually, I only want to allow digits 0-9 using this:

   $w configure -invalidcommand bell -validate key -validatecommand  {regexp {^[0-9]*$} %S}

It works fine. Now I want to extend this expression to only allow digits 0-9 or the exact word "Rigid". I tried this, but it allows me to type anything.

$w configure -invalidcommand bell -validate key -validatecommand  {regexp {regexp {^([0-9])|^Rigid?\>*$} %S}
3

You might consider putting your validation code into a proc:

$w configure -invalidcommand bell -validate key -validatecommand  {validate %S}

proc validate {data} {
    return [regexp {^(?:[0-9]*|Rigid)$} $data]
    # or
    return [expr {$data eq "Rigid" || [string is integer $data]}]
}

or

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1

The ^([0-9])|^Rigid?\>*$ pattern allows matching more than what you need as ^ only applies to the ([0-9]), a digit, so the first char should be a digit, and the rest can be any. ^Rigid?\>*$ matches a string that starts with Rigi, may have a d after it, and then has 0+ > symbols.

You need

{^(?:[0-9]*|Rigid)$}

Here, the anchors are applied to both the patterns and will only allow 0+ digits or Rigid as a whole string.

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$w configure -invalidcommand bell -validate key -validatecommand {regexp {^[0-9]*$} %S}

This will allow either null or "one or multiple digits in the range 0-9".

To ensure at least 1 digit, use + instead of *.

Now coming to your question - allow digits 0-9 or the exact word "Rigid"

Use {(^[0-9]+$|^Rigid$)}

Lets site an example which I have just tried:

set a [gets stdin]

if {[regexp -- {(^[0-9]+$|^Rigid$)} $a]} { puts "yes" } else { puts "no" }

Outputs:

$ tclsh test1 12 yes $ tclsh test1 Rigid yes $ tclsh test1 rigid no $ tclsh test1 32w no $ tclsh test1

no

$

Apology for the format. enter image description here

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