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This is probably simple for most python users. I have a list of lists:

adv1 = [9999, 'Group1', 12345, 'team1']
adv2 = [8888, 'Group2', 12341, 'team2']
adv3 = [8888, 'Group2', 46563, 'team3']
adv4 = [8888, 'Group2', 23478, 'team4']

all_adv = [adv1, adv2, adv3, adv4]    # <- list of lists

There are 2 'Groups' and 4 'teams' in the data. I am trying to iterate through the all_adv data to create a dictionary sorta like this:

  { 
  Group1 : 9999,
  teams: {
    team1 : 12345
  },
  {
  Group2 : 8888,
  teams: {
    team2 : 12341,
    team3 : 46563,
    team4 : 23478
    }
  }

which groups all the teams under a 'teams' key in their respective Group. I can't figure out the logic. I want to do something like this:

dict = {}
dict['teams'] = []
for row in all_adv:
  dict[row[1]] = row[0]
  if row[1] not in dict:
    dict['teams'] = []
  dict['teams'].append({row[3] : row[2]})

print dict

Output:

{'Group2': 8888, 'Group1': 9999, 'teams': [{'team1': 12345}, {'team2': 12341}, {'team3': 46563}, {'team4': 23478}]}

I'm not sure but am thinking I need to make a list of a dictionary of individual groups that includes a dictionary of teams. Any pointers?

1
  • what you have described isn't a syntactically correct dict. at a guess, @TigerhawkT3's answer is probably what you want if you're looking to associate teams to groups – aydow Mar 1 '17 at 3:47
3

I'd recommend a dictionary of dictionaries (rather than a list of dictionaries), with a key of the group name and a value of another dictionary, containing the group's ID and its teams.

adv1 = [9999, 'Group1', 12345, 'team1']
adv2 = [8888, 'Group2', 12341, 'team2']
adv3 = [8888, 'Group2', 46563, 'team3']
adv4 = [8888, 'Group2', 23478, 'team4']

all_adv = [adv1, adv2, adv3, adv4]

d = {}
for i, n, s, t in all_adv:
    if n not in d:
        d[n] = {'id':i, 'teams':{}}
    d[n]['teams'][t] = s

The result:

>>> import pprint
>>> pprint.pprint(d, width=30)
{'Group1': {'id': 9999,
            'teams': {'team1': 12345}},
 'Group2': {'id': 8888,
            'teams': {'team2': 12341,
                      'team3': 46563,
                      'team4': 23478}}}
1
  • Brilliant thanks this is great. This is a better setup. – kevingduck Mar 1 '17 at 4:20
1

This might be also one solution:

from itertools import groupby
from operator import itemgetter


adv1 = [9999, 'Group1', 12345, 'team1']
adv2 = [8888, 'Group2', 12341, 'team2']
adv3 = [8888, 'Group2', 46563, 'team3']
adv4 = [8888, 'Group2', 23478, 'team4']
all_adv = [adv1, adv2, adv3, adv4]

group_id_map = {ii[1]: ii[0] for ii in all_adv}
all_adv.sort(key=itemgetter(1))
groups = {}
for k, r in groupby(all_adv, key=itemgetter(1)):
    teams = {ii[3]: ii[2] for ii in r}
    group = dict(id=group_id_map[k], team=teams)
    groups[k] = group

And the result:

import json


print(json.dumps(groups, indent=4))

{
    "Group1": {
        "id": 9999,
        "team": {
            "team1": 12345
        }
    },
    "Group2": {
        "id": 8888,
        "team": {
            "team2": 12341,
            "team3": 46563,
            "team4": 23478
        }
    }
}

If I can decide type of adv1, adv2 ..., I am going to use namedtuple instead of list because it's much easier to use.

from collections import namedtuple
from itertools import groupby
from operator import attrgetter


Team = namedtuple('Team', 'group_id group_name team_id team_name')

adv1 = [9999, 'Group1', 12345, 'team1']
adv2 = [8888, 'Group2', 12341, 'team2']
adv3 = [8888, 'Group2', 46563, 'team3']
adv4 = [8888, 'Group2', 23478, 'team4']
all_adv = [adv1, adv2, adv3, adv4]
all_adv = [Team(*ii) for ii in all_adv]

group_id_map = {ii.group_name: ii.group_id for ii in all_adv}
all_adv.sort(key=attrgetter('group_name'))
groups = {}
for k, r in groupby(all_adv, key=attrgetter('group_name')):
    teams = {ii.team_name: ii.team_id for ii in r}
    group = dict(id=group_id_map[k], team=teams)
    groups[k] = group

The result should be same.

Reference:

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