0

A colleague of mine noticed some odd behaviour with the sort command today, and I was wondering if anyone knows if the output of this command is intentional or not?

Given the file:

ABC_22
ABC_43
ABC_1
ABC_1
ABC_43
ABC_10
ABC_123

We are looking to sort the file with numeric sort, and also make it unique, so we run:

sort file.txt -nu

The output is:

ABC_22

Now, we know that the numeric sort won't work in this case as the lines don't begin with numbers (and that's fine, this is just part of a larger script), but I would have expected something more along the lines of:

ABC_1
ABC_10
ABC_123
ABC_22
ABC_43

Does anyone know why this isn't the case? The sort acts as one would expect if given just the -u or -n options individually.

1

You are missing specifying the de-limit on the second field of GNU sort as

sort -nu -t'_' -k2 file
ABC_1
ABC_10
ABC_22
ABC_43
ABC_123

The flag -n for numerical sort, -u for unique lines and the key part is to set de-limiter as _ and sort on the second field after _ done by -k2.

1

With -n, an empty number is zero:

Sort numerically. The number begins each line and consists of optional blanks, an optional ‘-’ sign, and zero or more digits possibly separated by thousands separators, optionally followed by a decimal-point character and zero or more digits. An empty number is treated as ‘0’.

All these lines have an empty number at the start of the line, so they are all zero for sort's numerical uniqueness. If you'd started each line with the same number, say 1, the effect would be the same. You should specify the field containing the numbers explicitly, or use version sort (-V):

$ sort -Vu foo
ABC_1
ABC_10
ABC_22
ABC_43
ABC_123 

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.