226

I've found the R.string pretty awesome for keeping hardcoded strings out of my code, and I'd like to keep using it in a utility class that works with models in my application to generate output. For instance, in this case I am generating an email from a model outside of the activity.

Is it possible to use getString outside a Context or Activity? I suppose I could pass in the current activity, but it seems unnecessary. Please correct me if I'm wrong!

Edit: Can we access the resources without using Context?

  • 3
    By passing the context to the class that is going to use the string, you are also passing information about what language (en, es, etc) is being used by the app. So if you have two strings.xml, it will know which one to use – sports Aug 10 '14 at 19:08

11 Answers 11

383

Yes, we can access resources without using `Context`

You can use:

Resources.getSystem().getString(android.R.string.somecommonstuff)

... everywhere in your application, even in static constants declarations. Unfortunately, it supports the system resources only.

For local resources use this solution. It is not trivial, but it works.

  • 12
    what is meant by system resources? the strings.xml is system resource or not? For me it does not work, says cannot find resource. – kirhgoff Mar 15 '13 at 9:20
  • 6
    The system resources belong to Android on the device. strings.xml belong to your application only. Look for stackoverflow.com/a/4391811/715269 solution – Gangnus Mar 15 '13 at 9:29
  • 3
    This is an elegant solution for those Factory classes when accessing strings. I don't enjoy passing along Context everywhere. That's just unnecessary clutter for instances where we really just want a string stored globally. – Jay Snayder Apr 19 '13 at 13:39
  • gracias for letting me, to not to leave android programming when we are used to of Helper classes – Arsalan Saleem Mar 9 '15 at 14:47
  • 1
    is this more effiecient than passing the context to a class and using it ?? – SoliQuiD Oct 28 '15 at 13:08
106

Unfortunately, the only way you can access any of the string resources is with a Context (i.e. an Activity or Service). What I've usually done in this case, is to simply require the caller to pass in the context.

  • 4
    Thanks for the tip! I just tried this, but for some reason I got a compile error when I tried: ctx.getString(ctx.R.string.blah); – SapphireSun Nov 23 '10 at 6:40
  • I would make the argument to the util methods of type Context so that you can use it from either an Activity or a Service. – MatrixFrog Nov 23 '10 at 6:42
  • 2
    You don't need the ctx.R.string.blah, just use R.string.blah – Pentium10 Nov 23 '10 at 6:42
  • 2
    I am not sure from where the symbol not found error comes, but make sure you have R imported on top of the class. – Pentium10 Nov 23 '10 at 6:50
  • 11
    The answer is FALSE. Vis the next one. :-) – Gangnus Jan 6 '12 at 23:22
31

In MyApplication, which extends Application:

public static Resources resources;

In MyApplication's onCreate:

resources = getResources();

Now you can use this field from anywhere in your application.

  • Would it work through service? (Especially when Android kills app and starts only service) – Atul Apr 17 '16 at 8:00
  • 1
    Yes, Android begins to execute your code by calling Application.onCreate and after that it runs your service. – konmik Apr 18 '16 at 12:53
21

BTW, one of the reason of symbol not found error may be that your IDE imported android.R; class instead of yours one. Just change import android.R; to import your.namespace.R;

So 2 basic things to get string visible in the different class:

//make sure you are importing the right R class
import your.namespace.R;

//don't forget about the context
public void some_method(Context context) {
   context.getString(R.string.YOUR_STRING);
}
11

Unique Approach

App.getRes().getString(R.string.some_id)

This will work everywhere in app. (Util class, Dialog, Fragment or any class in your app)

(1) Create or Edit (if already exist) your Application class.

import android.app.Application;
import android.content.res.Resources;

public class App extends Application {
    private static App mInstance;
    private static Resources res;


    @Override
    public void onCreate() {
        super.onCreate();
        mInstance = this;
        res = getResources();
    }

    public static App getInstance() {
        return mInstance;
    }

    public static Resources getResourses() {
        return res;
    }

}

(2) Add name field to your manifest.xml <application tag.

<application
        android:name=".App"
        ...
        >
        ...
    </application>

Now you are good to go. Use App.getRes().getString(R.string.some_id) anywhere in app.

  • 1
    I personally like this approach. Convenient to get custom string resources from anywhere in the code. – dutchman711 Nov 24 '18 at 12:47
  • Are there any security issues with this solution? – user1823280 Apr 22 at 7:43
  • @user1823280 No, I dont think. – Khemraj Apr 22 at 8:31
4

If you have a class that you use in an activity and you want to have access the ressource in that class, I recommend you to define a context as a private variable in class and initial it in constructor:

public class MyClass (){
    private Context context;

    public MyClass(Context context){
       this.context=context;
    }

    public testResource(){
       String s=context.getString(R.string.testString).toString();
    }
}

Making an instant of class in your activity:

MyClass m=new MyClass(this);
1

The best approach from the response of Khemraj:

App class

class App : Application() {

    companion object {
        lateinit var instance: Application
        lateinit var resourses: Resources
    }


    // MARK: - Lifecycle

    override fun onCreate() {
        super.onCreate()
        instance = this
        resourses = resources
    }

}

Declaration in the manifest

<application
        android:name=".App"
        ...>
</application>     

Constants class

class Localizations {

    companion object {
        val info = App.resourses.getString(R.string.info)
    }

}

Using

textView.text = Localizations.info
0

This should get you access to applicationContext from anywhere allowing you to get applicationContext anywhere that can use it; Toast, getString(), sharedPreferences, etc.

The Singleton:

package com.domain.packagename;

import android.content.Context;

/**
 * Created by Versa on 10.09.15.
 */
public class ApplicationContextSingleton {
    private static PrefsContextSingleton mInstance;
    private Context context;

    public static ApplicationContextSingleton getInstance() {
        if (mInstance == null) mInstance = getSync();
        return mInstance;
    }

    private static synchronized ApplicationContextSingleton getSync() {
        if (mInstance == null) mInstance = new PrefsContextSingleton();
        return mInstance;
    }

    public void initialize(Context context) {
        this.context = context;
    }

    public Context getApplicationContext() {
        return context;
    }

}

Initialize the Singleton in your Application subclass:

package com.domain.packagename;

import android.app.Application;

/**
 * Created by Versa on 25.08.15.
 */
public class mApplication extends Application {

    @Override
    public void onCreate() {
        super.onCreate();
        ApplicationContextSingleton.getInstance().initialize(this);
    }
}

If I´m not wrong, this gives you a hook to applicationContext everywhere, call it with ApplicationContextSingleton.getInstance.getApplicationContext(); You shouldn´t need to clear this at any point, as when application closes, this goes with it anyway.

Remember to update AndroidManifest.xml to use this Application subclass:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>

<manifest
    xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    package="com.domain.packagename"
    >

<application
    android:allowBackup="true"
    android:name=".mApplication" <!-- This is the important line -->
    android:label="@string/app_name"
    android:theme="@style/AppTheme"
    android:icon="@drawable/app_icon"
    >

Please let me know if you see anything wrong here, thank you. :)

0

It's better to use something like this without context and activity:

Resources.getSystem().getString(R.string.my_text)
-2

Here's what I did, In your MainActivity, create a static variable for context as shown below:

public static Context mContext;

and in the onCreate() initialise mContext to this;

mContext = this;

Then, in the file where you want to access context, say,

private Context context = MainActivity.mContext;

Now, you can get a string resource in the following manner,

String myString = context.getResources().getString(R.string.resource_id);
-8

I used getContext().getApplicationContext().getString(R.string.nameOfString); It works for me.

  • 14
    Do you think getContext() is available everywhere?! – Hamzeh Soboh Jun 27 '15 at 6:53
  • 1
    This does not provide an answer to the question because getContext() only available in activites and fragments classes – Umar Ata Jan 19 '17 at 11:09

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